In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other.

Over the past five years Kristi Morgansen, a UW assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics, has built three Robofish that communicate with one another underwater. Recently at the International Federation of Automatic Control’s Workshop on Navigation, Guidance and Control of Underwater Vehicles, she presented results showing that the robots had successfully completed their first major test. The robots were programmed to either all swim in one direction or all swim in different directions, basic tasks that can provide the building blocks for coordinated group movement. This success in indoor test tanks will eventually provide the basis for ocean-going systems to better explore remote ocean environments.

“Underwater robots don’t need oxygen. The only reason they come up to the surface right now is for communication,” Morgansen said.

Her robots would not need to come to the surface until their task was complete. They could cooperatively track moving targets underwater, such as groups of whales or spreading plumes of pollution, or explore caves, go underneath ice-covered waters, or into) dangerous environments where surfacing might not be possible. Schools of robots would be able to work together to do things that one could not do alone, such as tracking large herds of animals or mapping expanses of pollution that can grow and change shape.

Co-authors on the recent paper were doctoral students Daniel Klein and Benjamin Triplett in the Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics, and doctoral student Patrick Bettale in the Department of Electrical Engineering. The research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

The robots look rather fishlike because they use fins rather than propellers. This makes them potentially more maneuverable and creates lower drag than propeller vessels, and also could be less conspicuous by generating fewer air bubbles.

But while other research groups have developed fishlike robots, what’s novel with this system is that the robotic fish can communicate wirelessly underwater. Again, Morgansen looked to natural systems for inspiration. The engineers worked with collaborator Julia Parrish, an associate professor in the UW’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, to record patterns of fish schools’ behavior.

“In schooling and herding animals, you can get much more efficient maneuvers and smoother behaviors than what we can do in engineering right now,” Morgansen explained. “The idea of these experiments [with schools of live fish] is to ask, ‘How are they doing it?’ and see if we can come up with some ideas.”

The team trained some live fish to respond to a stimulus by swimming to the feeding area. Scientists discovered that even when less than a third of the fish were trained, the whole school swam to the feeding area on cue.

“The fish that have a strong idea tend to dominate over those that don’t,” Morgansen said. “That has implications for what will happen in a group of vehicles. Can one vehicle make the rest of the group do something just based on its behavior?”

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Comments

  1. #1 JanieBelle
    June 10, 2008

    I for one, welcome our…

    Nah skip it. That’s been done to death.

  2. #2 Greg Laden
    June 10, 2008

    What, you couldn’t bring yourself to say “overfish” ???

  3. #3 JanieBelle
    June 10, 2008

    [Austin Powers voice]

    Do I make you corny, Baby? Do I make you pun?

    [/Austin Powers voice]