There are a lot of ways to do this, but I just ran across one that may be just what some people need. This is an Open Access book called The Linux Starter Pack produced by Linux Format (which is an over-priced but entertaining Linux magazine).

The “starter pack” is a giant PDF file, 130 pages, which tells you how to install and use a common Linux distribution known as Ubuntu. You’ve probably heard of it.

Here is where you download the PDF file and learn more about it.

Comments

  1. #1 Tony Sidaway
    April 10, 2009

    You’ve probably herd of it.

    No, it’s quite GNU to me.

  2. #2 Mike Haubrich, FCD
    April 10, 2009

    One hundred Therdy pages? How abou this?
    Download install file
    Verify MD5
    Burn ISO to CD
    Place CD in CD Drive
    Enter local time zone
    Create User Id and Password.
    Download updates.

    Snip snap snout.

  3. #3 Dan J
    April 10, 2009

    As luck would have it, today an old friend of mine asked me which Linux distro I use. Remembering this post, I pointed him to the PDF file (and offered my own assistance if needed). Many years ago he was an Amiga user (as was I), but I think now he’s only using MS Windows.

    The Linux Starter Pack PDF file does seem like it would be quite useful for first-time users, giving information about how to perform the basic tasks that most of us use our PCs for every day, no matter what the operating system.

    I also let my friend know about the Wubi installer. This program installs Ubuntu as a boot option for Windows PCs, but does not partition the drives or otherwise interfere with the Windows installation. You can play with it as long as you like, and then uninstall it from the Windows control panel if you don’t want it any more. I suggested that it might be a good way to see how compatible his current hardware setup might be with Ubuntu.

  4. #4 Greg Laden
    April 10, 2009

    I think WUBI might be OK, but I reiterate: The safest, most satisfying, most useful and best way to install Linux (other than running a knoppix CD of course) is to just install it on nice, freshly partitioned hard drives, with no multiple booting. If Wubi works, that’s great, but I just think its potentially tricky and kinds strange.

    I dunno…. running Linux and Windows on the same computer. It just feels dirty.

  5. #5 Dan J
    April 10, 2009

    I dunno…. running Linux and Windows on the same computer. It just feels dirty.

    I had to laugh at this. Every time I start up Windows inside VirtualBox, it makes that Windows startup sound, and my wife says “Eeeeeeewww!”

  6. #6 D. C. Sessions
    April 11, 2009

    The safest, most satisfying, most useful and best way to install Linux (other than running a knoppix CD of course) is to just install it on nice, freshly partitioned hard drives, with no multiple booting.

    I generally advise people to put a blank drive (an old one will do) in and disconnect the rest. Maybe even put it/them in a drawer. It’s not necessary but it serves to boost peace of mind.

  7. #7 GaryB
    April 11, 2009

    Thank you sir, your timing couldn’t have been better.

    I just had an update problem where I’m now forced to do partial updates. I’m hoping this new info will give me some guidance.

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