The End of the Line

I just read this, and it made me want to see this:

and I’m asking you to look at this, but also this.

Comments

  1. #1 Jodi
    June 12, 2009

    Wow, that music gave me goosebumps, chosen for that reason no doubt. I’ll have to look into this more. Thanks.

  2. #2 sailor
    June 12, 2009

    with reference to the discussion of what you can and cannot eat on the second link. Are you really sure you are eating what is on the menu?
    Many years ago I flew with a friend who used to go to an island with a productive fishery and bring back to the island where we lived, boxes of frozen “Sea Flakes”, or the more common name shark bits, except people would not buy them with that name. He sold them to restaurants, and one I used to patronize had them on the menu the next day as “fresh red snapper”. Well I guess they had been pretty able snappers.

  3. #3 Erin
    June 14, 2009

    It’s true, mislabeling is a serious problem. You see a cut of white fish flesh at the counter of the grocery store and it says “Cod” and who are you to argue. But there was an article I read a few months ago (can’t find a link now, of course) but it was about just that: stores and restaurants often buy things that are either mislabeled to start, or intentionally mislabel them so it will sell.

    There’s no real good surefire way to know besides finding a trustworthy source or picking it out from the docks or catching it yourself. Not that I highly recommend the latter approach unless you’ve got the spare time. But I find it’s similar to finding sustainable meats: know the source, pick it out yourself.

    There’s also the argument that in the context of energy costs due to transportation and refrigeration, unless you live by the ocean don’t eat seafood. More extreme, but it’s an argument I’ve heard before.