From Dan Savage:

Most residents of Fort Worth have never even seen the inside of a gay bar. Fort Worth’s police chief Jeff Halstead is counting on that fact–counting on the average person’s ignorance about gay bars and certain stereotypes about gay men–to get a half a dozen Forth Worth police officers off the hook for conducting a violent raid on a Forth Worth gay bar, the Rainbow Lounge, late last Saturday night. Seven men were arrested during the raid, which took place on the 40th anniversary of the raid on the Stonewall Inn that kick-started the modern gay rights movement, and one of those men–Chad Gibson–remains in intensive care with a brain injury. Gibson may not survive.

Comments

  1. #1 MikeMa
    July 1, 2009

    Where is the outrage? These bastards show how cops came to be called pigs.

  2. #2 sailor
    July 1, 2009

    “I’ve been in a million gay bars. I’ve been in gay bars on multiple occasions when the police came in to check everyone’s IDs and make sure no minors were being served. Gay men don’t grope police officers when they enter gay bars.”
    Even if they did, it is hardly an excuse to send the guy to hospital. Think what would happen to the world if women armed themselves and behaved similarly every time they were groped.

  3. #3 Dan J
    July 1, 2009

    I’ve known several police officers quite well, and they were all very cool people. Of course, that was primarily over twenty years ago. I’ve encountered several police officers over the past several years, many of whom were very polite, cordial, and fair. There were others that were confrontational from their first words to me (which, of course, made my adrenalin start pumping). There are a lot of cops out there who simply should not be cops. I think their training and requirements have tapered off in the past few decades.

  4. #4 Stephanie Z
    July 1, 2009

    This attitude is one of the better arguments for hate crime legislation I’ve seen. If this is your local law enforcement, what recourse do you have if not the feds?

  5. #5 MadScientist
    July 1, 2009

    I bet the police chief is a raving religious bigot too.

    @Dan: there have always been great cops and awful cops (anyone remember Serpico and the NYPD?). I’ve always suspected that there have been good people with a sense of fairness who actually want to be cops, and then there are the high-school flunkees, bitter that they’re not a football/baseball/basketball star, who can’t even find employment from a certain clown and who decide they’ll join the police force instead because it gives them authority to terrorize all those idiots who didn’t recognize their football/baseball/basketball talents – especially those fags, jews, atheists, and immigrants.

  6. #6 wrpd
    July 1, 2009

    In the early 70s I was a regular at two gay bars in Chicago. They were a half a block away from each other. One closed at 1:00am and the other at 2:00am, so there was a nightly procession from the first bar to the second. A police officer was often parked on the street between the bars. Every time I passed by the cop would ask me to show him my ID. Every time I did that he would remark how I looked younger that I was and then he would tell me how cute I was and how it was a shame I was alone, etc. The cop was very, very attractive. I was 99% sure he was gay, but that nagging 1% prevented me from doing anything like giving him my phone number or arrange a date. There was still much animosity between the police and the GLBT community. As much as I wanted to get to know him better, I was still afraid of his being physically violent.
    It turned out that he was gay. He came out to the other cops and faced a lot of opposition from them.
    He died a few years ago of AIDS. He was still on active duty. Normally when an active duty cop died the cops at his station and others would show up en mass at the funeral. At his funeral there was one female cop. It was so sad.

  7. #7 marilove
    July 2, 2009

    And let’s not forget, MadScientist, that it’s the corrupt cops who tend to have all the power and influence.

  8. #8 jay
    July 2, 2009

    This attitude is one of the better arguments for hate crime legislation I’ve seen. If this is your local law enforcement, what recourse do you have if not the feds?

    Actually we need a law structure to deal with violent and abusive cops, regardless of whether it’s ‘hate’, greed, corruption, arrogance, intimidation or whatever. Why they commit these offenses is immaterial.

  9. #9 Stephanie Z
    July 2, 2009

    And we have a legal structure that handles the corruption. At least one police department has been prosecuted under RICO. RICO won’t handle anything that doesn’t have a profit motive, however. Hate crimes laws will also handle the crimes that aren’t committed by local law enforcement, but which local law enforcement refuses to deal with under the reasoning that the victims “had it coming.”

  10. #10 stogoe
    July 2, 2009

    Actually we need a law structure to deal with violent and abusive cops, regardless of whether it’s ‘hate’, greed, corruption, arrogance, intimidation or whatever. Why they commit these offenses is immaterial.

    Way to expose your complete and utter ignorance of the United States Legal System, there, bucko. Can you really be so dense as to think that motive plays no part in criminal proceedings? How fucking stupid are you?

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