Well, not really, but if on line CBT takes off, how will we know when they make the switch?

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) seems to be effective when delivered online in real time by a therapist, with benefits maintained over 8 months. This method of delivery could broaden access to CBT in primary care. These are the conclusions of an article in this week’s Global Mental Health special edition of The Lancet, written by Dr David Kessler, NIHR National School for Primary Care Research, University of Bristol and colleagues.

source

Comments

  1. #1 Benjamin Geiger
    August 27, 2009

    Mr. Turing, please call your office.

  2. #2 Jason Thibeault
    August 27, 2009

    My therapist’s name is Eliza.

  3. #3 gruebait
    August 27, 2009

    How does that make you feel?

  4. #4 Greg Laden
    August 28, 2009

    Did you ask me if your therapist is named Eliza? Please tell me more about that.

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  5. #5 Jared
    August 28, 2009

    I wonder what kind of problems may result from a therapist “dying” during a session…

  6. #6 Mona Albano
    August 28, 2009

    I thought that was “Computer-Based Training” but if you have a human guided by a computer helping you, it’s more likely to be an Expert System–the kind of thing that helps call centre operators tell you what mortgage you can afford or reminds doctors to check for obscure diagnoses. It’s a fascinating and largely undeveloped form of technical communication.

    Actually, I found the weightwatchers online program to be a good example of online feedback that helps to change behavior. You tell them your dietary choices and they tell you when you’ve run out of points for the day–constant feedback. It’s cheaper and more convenient than going to meetings.

  7. #7 Stephanie Z
    August 28, 2009

    This kind of news makes me very happy. One of the reasons I didn’t go into therapy was that almost none of it stood up to testing. CBT has consistently been the one type of therapy that’s shown any lasting effects on depression (I really hope they continue to follow up on this study), but it can be pretty intensive. Something like this puts CBT within reach for so many more people.

    Also, I have to admit that a therapy that’s based on teaching people how to think tickles me to no end.