An Interview with Vandana Shiva

Comments

  1. #1 NewEnglandBob
    March 17, 2010

    She said nothing that is not already well known about scarcity of resources. Wars are also fought over religion – she failed to mention that.

    She is off base about women controlling agriculture vs patriarchy. It has nothing to do with gender.

  2. #2 History Punk
    March 18, 2010

    Her ideas about agriculture sound good until you realize that industrail agriculture came about because of the prior failure of her belief system.

  3. #3 megan
    March 18, 2010

    Industrial ag in essence came about by male control of ag resources to compensate for their patriarchal control imperative of human reproduction which inherently created more mouths to feed than can be feed by local sustainable food growing systems because women aren’t allowed to regulate their pregnancy rates – God’s Law. But admittedly both sexes pushed for more mouths to replace the people who died too quick from ill health and starvation, ironically from low food production. In addition extra hands for labor to create more food made more people mouths to feed. So an endless cycle got started til now as intelligent beings we should be able to distribute/grow food with minimum labor(mouths) to slow the instinctive need for non-stop procreation as if we’re going extinct because there’s no food or need more hands to grow it.

    The present ‘belief’ system vs this woman’s opinions is equally a failure because our species besides the millions already extinct from being absorbed or destroyed by human biolife, is next in line for extinction as the ecosystem is disrupted. Glad History D00d thinks outgrowing a petri ‘food’ dish by rapid unhindered growth depleting resources to extinction is a sign of biological success.

  4. #4 Sharon Astyk
    March 18, 2010

    I realize most people won’t read it because of the dreadful title, but I would encourage people to read the population section of Shiva and Mies’s book _Ecofeminism_ in which they track the relationship of population instability in India along with colonialism – it isn’t clear to me that women were failing to self-regulate fertility in pre-colonial India, given the data.

    I think one of the problems with seeing just interviews with Shiva is that you miss an enormous body of background scholarship in her writings.

    Sharon