The relationship between art and science today “is a little bit like romance,” said Lynn Fellman. What’s being learned about our species and about each other “is like getting to know someone new,” she said. “It’s surprising; It’s a sense of discovery,” one that artists, who speak through a visual language, respond to. “You know that there’s beauty in the idea of evolution,” she said, adding that art can express that beauty.

The Minneapolis-based artist, a member of the bio-art movement that seeks to bridge the worlds of art and science, uses recent discoveries about the human genome as the basis for portraits and other works that offer a glimpse into our roots

Read the entire story here.

Visit Lynn’s studio site here.

Comments

  1. #1 travc
    March 24, 2010

    An acquaintance of mine in show-biz once commented that scientists are popular at parties with media/art creatives. He’s one to know, since his SO is a professor ;)

    From my personal experience, art and science get along well. I’ve always had interesting interactions with artists, including my brother (who is an illustrator) and his friends/colleagues. (BTW: I’m the scientist in those interactions.)

Current ye@r *