PLoS has had a few blogs all along, PLoS.org, everyONE and Speaking of Medicine (the PLoS ONE and PLoS Medicine community blogs respectively). But now there is a new network, at blogs.plos.org, which includes a number of new blogs, including a couple of Scienceblogs.com diasporics.

The new blogs are:


Scientists:

Take As Directed: [http://blogs.plos.org/takeasdirected]

David Kroll, Ph.D. is a cancer pharmacologist who investigates natural anticancer drugs and is best known under his blog pseudonym, “Abel Pharmboy”. He has appeared regularly on NPR and ABC News Now.

Neuroanthropology: [http://blogs.plos.org/neuroanthropology]

Daniel Lende, Ph.D. is a medical, psychological, and biological anthropologist. He worked as an assistant professor in anthropology at the University of Notre Dame. Daniel co-founded Neuroanthropology.net in 2007.

Greg Downey, Ph.D. is currently a Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He has published extensively on capoeira (an Afro-Brazilian art form), no-holds-barred fighting, coaching, dance, music etc.

Obesity Panacea: [http://blogs.plos.org/obesitypanacea]

Peter Janiszewski has a PhD in clinical exercise physiology from Queen’s University in Canada. He’s a science writer/editor, a published obesity researcher, university lecturer, and an advocate of new media.

Travis Saunders is a PhD student in health physiology at the University of Ottawa, who investigates sedentary lifestyles and chronic disease risk in children.

Gobbledygook: [http://blogs.plos.org/mfenner]

Martin Fenner, M.D. works as a medical doctor and cancer researcher in the Hannover Medical School Cancer Center in Germany. Since 2007, he has regularly written about how the internet is changing scholarly communication.

GenomeBoy: [http://blogs.plos.org/genomeboy]

Misha Angrist, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of the Practice at the Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy. In 2009 he had his full genome sequenced at Duke.

The Language of Bad Physics: [http://blogs.plos.org/badphysics]

Sarah Kavassalis has a B.S. in physics and mathematics and is currently a graduate student at the University of Toronto. She discusses semi-popular papers that lack an accurate basis in math and physics.

Speakeasy Science: [http://blogs.plos.org/speakeasyscience]

Deborah Blum is a Pulitzer prize-winning science writer and is a Professor of Journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her latest book, The Poisoner’s Handbook, was published in February 2010.

NeuroTribes: [http://blogs.plos.org/neurotribes]

Steve Silberman is a long-time writer whose articles have appeared in Wired, the New Yorker, Salon, Time, and many other national publications all with a Neurological slant.

The Gleaming Retort: [http://blogs.plos.org/retort]

John Rennie is an adjunct professor in graduate Science, Health and Environmental Reporting at New York University. John was the editor in chief of Scientific American and has appeared on PBS, NPR, ABC etc

Body Politic: [http://blogs.plos.org/bodypolitic]

Melinda Wenner Moyer is an award-winning science writer focusing on health and policy, and has a master’s degree in science journalism from New York University. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, Slate, The Oprah Magazine etc.

Wonderland: [http://blogs.plos.org/wonderland]

Emily Anthes is a freelance science writer and has a master’s degree in science writing from MIT. Her work has appeared in Scientific American Mind, Psychology Today, Popular Mechanics, Discover and elsewhere.

Comments

  1. #1 ecologist
    September 1, 2010

    Slightly OT, but do you have any idea why the Scientopia page comes up with a message “This account has been suspended”?

  2. #2 ecologist
    September 1, 2010

    Never mind, it’s back. Maybe someone forget to pay the electric bill.

  3. #3 Stephanie Z
    September 1, 2010

    The most entertaining explanation I’ve seen of Scientopia’s outage was, “The host responds to a DOS like a doctor who treats a headache by decapitating the patient.” Although it was probably better than that. I’m paraphrasing.

  4. #4 Dave, London
    September 1, 2010

    Another network, though perhaps on a smaller scale, was launched by the Guardian yeterday: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2010/aug/31/blogging-digital-media