The Institute for Creation “Research” moved from California to Texas a few years ago in part, it is believed, to set up a masters program for teachers in life sciences. I’m guessing they figured they could get Texas to certify a bogus Masters program more easily than California. They did make some progress, but it went to court, and just recently they lost that case and had to give up on the idea.

Subsequently, they’ve pulled another rabbit out of the hat: A degree in “Christian Apologetics” which would serve a similar purpose as the Creationist MA (and it would have a “Creation ‘Science’” minor. This degree, they claim, is not subject to state certification because it is religious. But that may not, in fact, be the case. From the NCSE:

The Institute for Creation Research claims that its new School of Bible Apologetics is “exempt from licensing by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board” — but is it?

, and you can read more about it at Panda’s Thumb.

Comments

  1. #1 Glenn Branch
    September 9, 2010

    The ICR is apparently out of the woods after all. The Texas Administrative Code provides, “The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board does not regulate Religious Institutions of Higher Education which offer degrees only in religious disciplines” (19 Tex. Admin. Code 1.7A, §7.9). It appears that THECB failed to clarify the relevant frequently asked questions of its website section in light of the Texas Supreme Court’s decision in HEB Ministries, Inc. et al. v. Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (235 S.W.3d 627 [Tex. 2007]), which established that THECB does not have oversight over institutions that offer exclusively religious education and training.

  2. #2 Greg Laden
    September 9, 2010

    But, in the end, what public school is going to hire a science teacher to teach science with only qualifications to teach religious classes?

  3. #3 Erp
    September 9, 2010

    Actually whose only qualification is to indoctrinate in a particular religion.

    Classes about religion(s) in public schools should be taught by people with an accredited degree with, ideally, coursework from a religious studies program at an accredited school.

  4. #4 Marion Delgado
    September 10, 2010

    This is terrible news. I wanted to get one of their degrees so I could have one of those apostate conversions they’re so fond of.

    “I prayed over it for a year, but it turned out the evolutionists were right!”

  5. #5 justin larmore
    January 27, 2011

    they should call themselves delusionist not creationist.