Richard? Richard!

There is a disturbance in the force. Well, actually, in the Caribbean. It is not named yet, but by the weekend it is likely that Richard will be the next named Atlantic storm. Richard is now a named tropical storm (named “Richard,” interestingly enough) in the Caribbean, with a likely path across the Yucatan.

Richard will probably be a hurricane by Saturday, move over land, weaken to a tropical storm, then emerge in the gulf to start it’s new life, in about four days. This could actually be a fairly serious storm for those in the Yucatan.

The sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico are not very high right now, so the chance of Richard reforming as a major hurricane are not very high.

Comments

  1. #1 EnglishAtheist
    October 21, 2010

    Proof there’s god: At TAM, PZ Myers invited us all to “Be the best Richard you can be”. This is obviously god’s response.

  2. #2 florakim kimya
    October 21, 2010

    Who gives the name for storm?

  3. #3 gruebait
    October 21, 2010

    Warning: Offtopic!
    …just testing Liberea – pay no attention, carry on, as you were,…

  4. #4 Greg Laden
    October 21, 2010

    What is this thread turning into???

  5. #5 Updated
    October 21, 2010

    Updated

  6. #6 bcoppola
    October 21, 2010

    Remember a couple of months ago when I asked you if the busy hurricane season that had been forecast was maybe getting off to a late start?

    You don’t? OK, never mind…forget I mentioned it…gee, aren’t the leaves pretty up here this month?

  7. #7 Greg Laden
    October 21, 2010

    I do remember.

    I’ve been wondering what happened to the predictions of a busy tropical storm season. Being a Midwesterner I’m admittedly not as attuned to such things as Gulf & Atlantic coast dwellers, but even though I know Aug/Sept. are usually the peak is it getting a late start for a busy season? BTW we did have a F1 tornado here last week, and the maple in front of our house is now lopsided, nothing worse thankfully. Neighborhood has been resounding with chainsaws and chippers for over a week. House down the street had a big tree go thru their roof – but no injuries there or anywhere.

  8. #8 Greg Laden
    October 21, 2010

    The average number of named storms per year since 1995 is 13.5. This year we’ve had 18. The largest three since 1995 were 28, 18, and 16 (two at 16).

    I think we got off to a late start, then had a whole pile of storms (almost all of which went off to the middle of the Atlantic to become a foggy morning in Iceland).

  9. #9 Birger Johansson
    October 22, 2010

    “Richard” as in the mild-mannered Richard Dawkins?
    If it had prospects of becoming a nasty piece of work, it should have been “Ratzinger”.
    “This could actually be a fairly serious storm for those in the Yucatan”
    This may be perception bias, but I get the impression Yucatan gets more than its share of hurricanes. Is it straight west from the hottest part of the Atlantic? I thought that would be more in the Nicaragua/Honduras region.

  10. #10 bcoppola
    October 22, 2010

    The Yucatan sticks up like a thumb from southern Mexico/Central America forming, with Cuba, the straits separating the Caribbean from the Gulf of Mexico. It’s right in the way of a common storm track.

    OT and sorry if I’ve said this before but: with the cheap flights available to Cancun you’re missing out if you haven’t visited the Yucatan. Basic procedure:

    1) Fly into Cancun.

    2) Rent a car.

    3) Get the fuck out of Cancun (Gringolandia) and start exploring!

    Do not miss Merida – a beautiful historic city worth at least a few days in itself. More if you use it as a base for day/overnight trips to places like Uxmal, Valladolid, Celestun, etc.

    Yucatecan cuisine is also distinctive and tasty!

  11. #11 Greg Laden
    October 22, 2010

    Yes, and the food at the “Maya Riviera” can be quite international as well. I’ve had excellent Italian and French food there as well.