The Rapture is Today

Happy Rapture Day!

It’s a bummer that it’s raining here, because the rapture BBQ at Kammy’s might be rained out. In the meantime I’ve got lots of stuff to get done … finish cleaning the garage, get the wood for a new book shelf, write a few more posts for Migration Week, update the Fukushima project, and if I have a chance finally get around to watching the new Dr. Wh……

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Comments

  1. #1 Victor
    May 21, 2011

    The Rapture doesn’t officially get here until 6PM. But, anyone left after that is officially a hell bound sinner. So, they might as well start believing in Evolution after that.

  2. #2 Equisetum
    May 21, 2011

    “It’s a bummer that it’s raining here, because the rapture BBQ at Kammy’s might be rained out.”

    The weather here’s great. If you can make it to Germany before I get raptured I’ll supply the charcoal.

  3. #3 phillydoug
    May 21, 2011

    The world won’t end today, but neither will idiotic belief systems, unfortunately.

    Just a remider why an atheist’s work is never done, and always consists of pushing heavy boulders uphill, only to have believers trying to roll them back down the hill:

    http://www.ou.edu/ouphil/faculty/chris/crmscreen.pdf

    (pg.379)

    “In 1954 Leon Festinger came across a newspaper account of a small “doomsday” cult who believed that the world would end on December 21. His coworkers infiltrated the group and observed the members’ behavior. The group members were very committed to their beliefs. They had gotten rid of all their possessions (who needs a toaster when the world is about to end?) and were genuinely preparing for the world to end.

    December 21 came and went, and the world didn’t end. This dramatically disconfirmed the group leader’s prediction, and we might expect that the members of the group would have lost their faith and left. Members of the group who were alone on December 21 did lose their faith, but those who were with the rest of the group did just the opposite. They concluded that their own actions had postponed the end—though it would arrive soon—and this seemed to strengthen their faith.

    Before their belief had been disconfirmed, members of the group hadn’t done much to convince others to join them, but after the disconfirmation, they worked hard to convert others to their own position. Their new belief, that their actions had delayed the end of the world, restored the consistency between their belief in the head of the group and the fact that they had given away everything they owned, on the one hand, and the fact that her prophecy failed, on the other.”