Comments

  1. #1 Ol' Bab
    January 25, 2012

    Too fast, too scanty!
    And misleading animation of electricity.
    Not so exciting.

    Ol’ Bab

  2. #2 Artor
    January 25, 2012

    Agreed. There is remarkably little information in this. I was amused at how it showed the hot steam just pouring out of the floor in the turbine room. Why are you posting this Greg?

  3. #3 jake
    January 25, 2012

    Steam goes in. Electricity goes out.

    You can’t explain that.

  4. #4 Greg Laden
    January 25, 2012

    Regular readers will know that I post these animations for two reasons: 1) they are sometimes funny (you’ve got to admit that the electricty was funny in this one) and 2) I’m interested in the idea that rapidly produced animations of current news stories could have value (negative or positive?) and like the idea of having them critiqued! The people who produce these presumably read most of the comments on them here (note to self: Remind them).

  5. #5 starskeptic
    January 25, 2012

    But you know that site’s animations are all true and accurate because they’re done using computers, right?
    -GIGO

  6. #6 Karen
    January 25, 2012

    It’s still fracking, and if done in the wrong place it’ll still cause earthquakes, mess with people’s drinking water wells, etc.

    I read an article recently reporting that someone is trying it in the utterly beautiful Newberry Caldera in Oregon, where there’s still a lot of hot rock under the surface and it’s far enough away from civilization. Although I dislike the idea of industrial development there, I suppose on the whole I’d like to see them succeed. We do need new sources of energy.

  7. #7 NJ
    January 25, 2012

    Jake @ 3:

    Steam goes in. Electricity goes out.

    You can’t explain that.

    Fucking turbines! How do they work?

  8. #8 Drivebyposter
    January 25, 2012

    [blockquotes]
    Fucking turbines! How do they work?
    [/blockquotes]
    I hear they use magnets

  9. #9 Birger Johansson
    January 26, 2012

    I wonder if this caldera could provide southern California with usable geothermal energy? -If so, it would be a nice supplement to photovoltaic power, since it is independent of time of day.
    “Ubehebe Crater: Possibly Younger but No Imminent Danger of an Eruption” http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/01/ubehebe-crater-possibly-younger-but-no-imminent-danger-of-an-eruption/

  10. #10 Doug Alder
    February 5, 2012

    A recent Government of Canada study showed that there was in Canada alone enough geothermal potential in 100 well sites (using EGS) to produce over 10^6 times the amount of electricity Canada now consumes – that’s enough to provide all the electrical needs of the entire continent.