Here is a small selection of responses and reactions to President Obama’s climate change speech.

Michael Mann: ‘The most aggressive and promising climate plan’ from ‘executive branch in years’

Michael Mann is director of Penn State University’s Earth System Science Center, and a genuine hero, who has been attacked by the climate denial nexus, which has tried to destroy his career. And he is fighting back. His brief statement on President Obama’s climate speech needs to be read in its entirety, but here are some key points…

President Obama acts on climate change by enforcing the law

The centerpiece of the plan is the announcement that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants, in addition to the rules already in draft form that are set to regulate emissions from new power plants. The White House released a video to explain the importance of these steps in addressing climate change by decarbonizing the economy.

Climate change: time for action, at last?

Ultimately, we need a comprehensive energy and climate policy that prices carbon pollution and levels the playing field for renewable sources of energy that are not degrading our climate and planet. But given that we have an intransigent congress (the current House Science committee leadership continues to deny even the existence of human-caused climate change), the president has been forced to turn to executive actions. His call for carbon emission limits on *all* coal-fired power plants, not just newly built plants, is a bold step forward. It will go some way to stemming our growing carbon emissions, and the impact they are having on our climate.

Artful and Delphic: Obama on Keystone Pipeline Is All Things at Once

As media tries to make sense of Obama’s obscure remarks on Keystone, the president becomes both an opponent and supporter of the project.

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The photo, from NOAA, is a human settlement in/on a marsh in Florida. How much sea level rise, and what kind of storm, will it take to make those houses into nice fishing grounds?

Comments

  1. #1 makeinu
    June 27, 2013

    The photo, from NOAA, is a human settlement in/on a marsh in Florida. How much sea level rise, and what kind of storm, will it take to make those houses into nice fishing grounds?

    Better question: who cares? Dumbasses shouldn’t have been allowed to build on a marsh in the first place.

    I have no pity for people who insist on living in stupid places when their homes get destroyed by the natural environment. Especially if they aren’t building with a mind to those risks.

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