Cosmos

Category archives for Cosmos

We know know what the famous announcement by the European Southern Observatory is. They found an asteroid with ring! Two of them! …the remote asteroid Chariklo is surrounded by two dense and narrow rings. Telescopes at seven locations in South America, including the 1.54-metre Danish and TRAPPIST telescopes at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile…

UPDATED: THIS is the discovery. The European Southern Observatory will make an announcement tomorrow (or later today depending on where you read this, but Wednesday) about an amazing new discovery they made in outer space. I’m not going to tell you what they found because it is top top secret. But it is very interesting…

If you missed the first (or later any) episode of Cosmos 2014, you can get it on Amazon Prime streaming (for a fee). It’s worth it. Here are a few comments I jotted down (then lightly edited) while watching the first episode. Neil does have his own spaceship, like Carl did. That’s important because it…

Look at the rock on the right, and the lack of rock on the left. (Our left.) It is being reported that this jelly-donut size rock appeared out of nowhere on the Martian surface between photographs. There are several possible explanations for this. 1) It grew there. 2) It was ejected from a steam vent…

He who lives by gravity shall die by gravity. That’s what they say in the gravity biz, anyway. GROCE is the European “Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer” Satellite which is a flying spacxe robot that has done some amazing research: GOCE has a gradiometer with three accelerometers to measure gravity very accurately, to…

Cold Fusion was first reported in 1989. The original experiment was supposed to have produced extra heat that could not be explained wiht chemistry or electronics, so naturally, fusion was considered. Contrary to popular belief, that original experiment has been replicated successfully. The problem isn’t that the first experiment produced actual extra heat and no…

There are bacteria that use Iron (and other elements) to make tiny magnets that they carry around so they don’t get lost. (I anthropomorphize slightly.) There are isotopes of Iron that are not of the Earth, but are found only elsewhere in the universe. Suppose an event happened elsewhere and spewed some of that cosmic…

I love it when scientists say that! And, so said scientist Daniel Baker, speaking of a newly observed feature of the famous and well known, or at least, we thought well known, Van Allen Belts. First discovered in 1958, the Van Allen belts have been thought to comprise two reservoirs of high-speed, electrically charged particles,…

Meteor Hits Russia, Not. Maybe did.

UPDATE: Somebody found a hole in some ice. This is a meteor streaking across the sky in the vicinity of the Urals: Numerous additional films of that event and some analysis are on Phil Plait’s blog, here. Here’s a FAKE video purported to be a crater formed by a fragment of that meteor BUT IT…

The #LearningSpace Google Hangout was talking today about the Galileoscope project. Galileo invented (I’m sure the story is more complex) the telescope and all that, and the Galileoscope project is HERE. The Galileoscope is a high-quality, low-cost telescope kit developed by a team of leading astronomers, optical engineers, and science educators. No matter where you…