birdwatching

Tag archives for birdwatching

Crossley Coffee Contest

Last month, we had a contest to celebrate the release of the Crossley ID Guide for Raptors. I asked readers to identify all of the Golden Eagles in a composite image, skipping none and including no non-Golden Eagles. The picture had a mixture of Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, and a couple of other raptors. Here…

A couple of years back, the The Crossley ID Guide for Eastern Birds came out and it caused a huge splash in the birdwatching world. For some time now it has become apparent that bird watching, especially the identification part of it, was changing in its approach. We describe it this way, though I think…

Golden Eagles and Free Coffee!

You’ve heard of the The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds (The Crossley ID Guides). It is a revolutionary new way to assemble a field guide, where each page has a drawing of what it would look like if suddenly outside your living room there was a full blown habitat for some species of bird, with…

How to draw birds

Tired of merely watching birds? Ever consider trying to draw them? There’s a method to do so. John Muir Laws is very good at this and he’s written a book that can help you get started, maybe even become good at it yourself: Laws Guide to Drawing Birds. In case you were wondering, Laws’ name…

Birds don’t live in nests. They make nests for specific purposes, use them for that purpose, then abandon them. Or, sometimes they don’t abandon them, but rather add on and use them again and again, but in between they don’t live in or on them. Well, sometimes they hang out on them a lot. And…

Is the age of the blog carnival at an end? A few months back, several individuals concerned with plant blogging put a fair amount of effort into reviving and updating the Berry Go Round plant carnival. The next edition of that carnival, by the way, is coming up, so you should submit a post on…

The Science of Birdwatching

Birdwatching might be a casual activity, a hobby, an avocation, or even a profession (often, perhaps, an obsession) depending on the bird watcher, but there is always a science to it, in at least two ways. First, there is the science of how to do it. In this sense, the term “science” means something vernacular.…