command line interface

Tag archives for command line interface

Command line unit conversion

The Linux command ‘units’ may or may not be installed on your system. If not, if you use synaptic or apt, type (at the prompt) sudo apt-get install units or equiviliant for other distributions. Then type in the word “units” and play around. Here are a few sample outputs: The program is a little clunky.…

Hacking a Google Calendar CLI Tool

I wrote earlier of the very useful command line utility called gcalcli (short for GoogleCALendarCommandLineInterface). Click here to read that post. One of the options is called “agenda” which spits out, by default, the next five days of calendar entries. If you would prefer a different range of time than five days, then you can…

Computer-based calendars are very useful, and the Google Calendar is probably one of the more widely used personal calendars other than scheduling programs such as MS Outlook and Groupwise (both of which are broken). But, webby gooey applications can be rather bothersome because they tend to take up a lot of screen real estate and…

The command line is a great place to get weather information. Here, I discuss one cli-app for current conditions and forecasts, in the larger context of why you would ever want to use the command line anyway.

Being a console geek in Linux

This is the first in a series about using the “command line” in Linux. It is also about knowing when to use a gui instead. But before going into any of that we need to understand what is meant by a “command line” application. You’ll find that as we explore that idea, a lot of…

Running Alpine in Function Key Mode

By now I assume you’ve experimented with Alpine, as a character-based email client. Well, I have another tip for you.

By default, the text-based email client ‘alpine’ requests a password the first time, per session, that it is requested a password from any email services it checks. For the duration of that session, it remembers the password, but forgets it if you quit alpine so you have to enter it again later. From a security…

For today’s Linux Hint: How to pick which browser will open when you pick a link while using apine in Ubuntu.

If you are using alpine as your email client, you may find that hitting ctrl-T to invoke a spell checker does not work, in alpine 1.0 as installed in Ubuntu. It is easy to fix.