Linux

Tag archives for Linux

The big new of the day in the OpenSource world is that FreeDOS’s web site, revised and updated, is out of Beta and fully up and running, here. If you click through you’ll find an update on a number of recent changes and updates to the operating system. Just in case you need to know…

Running Netflix on Linux

Do you have a Roku with which you watch Netflix? Do you watch Netflix on a Mac? If so, you are using either the Linux operating system or a closely related “*Nix” operating system. (Mac’s run on a form of OS that is the same basic system as Linux*)

Linux Readers’ Choice Awards

The Linux Journal reader’s choice awards have been announced. You’ll recall that I suggested to you some time ago that you contribute your vote. Now, you can find out if you won!

$25 tiny computer!

The games developer David Braben and some colleagues [developed] something called Raspberry Pi. It’s a whole computer on a tiny circuit board – not much more than an ARM processor, a USB port, and an HDMI connection. They plugged a keyboard into one end, and hooked the other into a TV they had brought with…

How to organize your stuff

The issue has been raised (recently, and many times in the past) of how to organize your stuff. And by stuff, I mean files on your computer which may be documents, photographs, videos, or other files. I want to record a few thoughts on this having just done a bunch of organizing of my stuff,…

Command line unit conversion

The Linux command ‘units’ may or may not be installed on your system. If not, if you use synaptic or apt, type (at the prompt) sudo apt-get install units or equiviliant for other distributions. Then type in the word “units” and play around. Here are a few sample outputs: The program is a little clunky.…

When it comes to ease of use, there is no difference between a computer with Windows and a computer with Linux, assuming both systems are installed properly. That there is a meaningful difference is a myth perpetuated by Windows fanboys or individuals who have outdated experience with Linux. Also, the comparison that is often being…

Hacking a Google Calendar CLI Tool

I wrote earlier of the very useful command line utility called gcalcli (short for GoogleCALendarCommandLineInterface). Click here to read that post. One of the options is called “agenda” which spits out, by default, the next five days of calendar entries. If you would prefer a different range of time than five days, then you can…

Computer-based calendars are very useful, and the Google Calendar is probably one of the more widely used personal calendars other than scheduling programs such as MS Outlook and Groupwise (both of which are broken). But, webby gooey applications can be rather bothersome because they tend to take up a lot of screen real estate and…

The command line is a great place to get weather information. Here, I discuss one cli-app for current conditions and forecasts, in the larger context of why you would ever want to use the command line anyway.