Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

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This video shows a conversation with a pet eclectus parrot, Eclectus roratus, named Riley. He is very talented, with a large and varied repertoire as well as a nice “voice.” I also live with an eclectus, a female Solomon Islands eclectus named Elektra, and I can attest to their talent as talkers. This species of parrot is color-coded by gender: males are emerald green while females are scarlet red [4:33]

Comments

  1. #1 Selasphorus
    October 30, 2008

    Talking parrot links still interest me, even though I live with some!

    I swear I live with the talkingest green-cheeked conure in the world. He belongs to my roommate and lives in a room with a Senegal parrot with a large vocabulary. They learn from each other–more often than not the Senegal scream is made by the conure, and the angry conure shriek comes from the Senegal. The conure has learned the Senegal’s phrases, including, “Meow” and “Cute!” But he still hasn’t mastered my favorite phrase of the Senegal’s, which is “You’re so weird.”

    My own lineolated parakeet has a very clear and distinct voice, and has learned to use “Good morning!” as a generalized greeting, so I get it whenever I enter the room or when he wants my attention. We also play a whistle game. He learned a three-tone whistle, and if I whistle the first two tones, he whistles the last one right in time. Then he whistles the first two notes and expects me to fill in the last one.

    Parrots are amazing. :)

  2. #2 rachel
    November 9, 2009

    Hi I’m getting a female from someone around here and she’s under a yr old according to the woman. She can only say hello but will she learn to say more? She’s a female solomon island eclectus. Riley is very cute and smart and I hope to teach her(pez is her name) some new words even if her vocab isn’t huge.
    thanks

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