Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

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Image: A Sea Change [larger view].

Can you imagine oceans that have been emptied of all fish? What would life be like for other life forms on this planet if there really were no more fish in the sea? This is not science fiction: human-caused ocean acidification is already making its effects known. Sometimes known as the “wet underbelly” or “evil twin” of climate change, ocean acidification is caused by excess carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels dissolving in sea water. The ocean becomes more acidic, making it difficult for tiny creatures at the bottom of the food web to form their shells. The effects could work their way up to the fishes that one billion people depend upon for their source of protein and livelihood.


A new thought-provoking film, A Sea Change, that explores this topic will premiere at New York City’s American Museum of Natural History on Sunday, September 13 at 4:00 pm Eastern. This event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a panel discussion including the actor and activist Sam Waterston (okay, say no more! I’ll be there for sure!!), the filmmakers, ocean acidification expert Dr. Richard Feely, and alternative energy investment consultant Tom van Dyke.

The duo behind A Sea Change — award-winning director Barbara Ettinger and her husband and co-producer Sven Huseby — will appear on The Martha Stewart Show on Thursday, September 24 at 10:00 am Eastern (nationally syndicated, check local listings).

A Sea Change will have its national primetime TV broadcast debut on the cable network Planet Green on Saturday, September 26 at 8:00 pm Eastern (with re-runs expected to start the following week). Planet Green is the first and only 24-hour eco-lifestyle television network. The broadcast is part of Planet Green’s Reel Impact film series.

Awards that A Sea Change has received include: Best Green Film, Kosovo International Documentary Film Festival; Grand Prize, Feature Documentary, FICA.

Comments

  1. #1 llewelly
    September 7, 2009

    Ocean life faces global overfishing, global chemistry changes due to CO2, many kinds of regional pollution, and global warming. Overfishing attacks the top of the food chain, ocean acidification attacks the bottom of the food chain. These factors may interact synergisticly…

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