Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Amazing Jellies

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Perhaps you’d like to see what some of those creatures are that are being endangered by the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? This lovely video provides a glimpse of the “gelata”: siphonophores, jellies and other soft, gelatinous marine animals that lack bones and brains, but nonetheless, comprise much of marine life. They are otherworldly creatures that glow in the dark, some more than 100 feet long. And they live just off California’s coast. Join two top marine biologists who have devoted their careers to unlocking the mysteries of jellyfish and alien-like siphonophores.


QUEST on KQED Public Media.

Learn more about these animals and the television programming schedule.

Comments

  1. #1 Tabor
    May 27, 2010

    I thought I was sick of the news when I watched with heart in throat during the last presidential election. Now I am back in that same place, but fearful that will not have a defintive end. This past cold winter had been so hard on the water birds down south and they were just beginning the recovery when this happened.

  2. #2 "GrrlScientist"
    May 27, 2010

    i feel so sad for all the creatures of the gulf when i watch this video after watching the previous video about the horrible effects of Corexit upon the oil spill. and this is all happening during spring migration, too … ! the damage could not have been greater if BP had actually planned this oil spill with their goal being maximizing damage to the gulf of mexico ecosystem and the neotropical wildlife that reside there or pass through on their way elsewhere.

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