Microbiology

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Category archives for Microbiology

tags: researchblogging.org, Macaw Wasting Disease, myenteric ganglioneuritis, proventricular dilatation disease, Bornaviridae, avian bornavirus, negative strand RNA viruses, pan-viral microarray, ViroChip One pair of the Little Blue (Spix’s) Macaw, Cyanopsitta spixii. This species is extinct in the wild and its captive population consists of roughly 70 to 100 individuals. Image: Fundação Parque Zoológico de São Paulo…

tags: researchblogging.org, dinosaurian soft tissue, fossils, bacterial biofilms, paleontology, endocasts, formerly pyritic framboids, collagen Figure 1. EDS spectrum of framboid. EDS spectrum of framboid showing an iron-oxygen signature. Pt is from coating for SEM. Area in red box was scanned for elements. [larger view]. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002808. Some of you might remember a paper published in…

tags: researchblogging.org, Bombus impatiens, Bumblebees, pathogen spillover, epidemiology, pollinating insects, greenhouses Common Eastern Bumblebee, Bombus impatiens. This species is often relied upon to pollinate commercial food crops, such as tomatoes, that are often grown in agricultural greenhouses. Image: Wikipedia Commons [larger view]. A mysterious decline in North American bumblebee populations is apparently the result of…

tags: Microcosm, microbiology, bacteria, E coli, evolution, Carl Zimmer, book review I lived through Seattle’s outbreak of the “killer E. coli strain O157:H7″ that charged into the world’s consciousness after it mercilessly destroyed the kidneys and other vital organs of hundreds of children and adults who consumed contaminated fast food. During this time, I worked…

Evolution: Random or Directed?

tags: researchblogging.org, evolution, experimental evolution, adaptation, mutation, natural selection, Richard E. Lenski The common gut bacteria, Escherichia coli, typically known as E. coli. Image: Dennis Kunkel. Evolution is a random process — or is it? I ask this because we all can name examples of convergent evolution where very different organisms arrived at similar solutions…

tags: hamster, PetSmart, lawsuit, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, LCMV, zoonosis Portrait of a murderer: A Siberian dwarf hamster, Phodopus sungorus. Orphaned image. I just learned that a lawsuit was recently filed in Massachusetts Superior Court on behalf of a man who died one month after receiving a transplanted liver that was later determined to be infected…

tags: What Bugged the Dinosaurs?, dinosaurs, insects, disease, George Poinar, Roberta Poinar, book review I grew up with a fondness for dinosaurs. Their unbelievable size, their peculiar shapes, and their undeniable absence from the world as I knew it were all sources of fascination. But never once did I think of the dinosaurs as being…

tags: Lab 257, Plum Island,animal disease research, USDA, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, Dutch duck plague After the recent outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the UK was shown to be the result this virus’s escape from one of two nearby research labs, I thought it was timely to review a book that investigates…

tags: researchblogging.org, Egyptian Rousette, Egyptian fruit bat, Rousettus aegyptiacus, Marburg hemorrhagic fever virus, Ebola hemorrhagic fever virus, Uganda, zoonoses, pathogen Portrait of an Egyptian Rousette or Egyptian fruit bat, Rousettus aegyptiacus. Image: Wikipedia Like something out of a sci-fi novel, a man from Uganda died a horrible, bloody death from Marburg hemorrhagic fever this past…

tags: tuberculosis, TB, Andrew Speaker, infectious diseases Did you hear that the man who was infected with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is an affluent marital and personal-injury attorney? It turns out that this selfish, idiotic dope who should know better, went on his honeymoon through Europe, knowing he had TB. While overseas, the infected man,…