Psychology

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Category archives for Psychology

tags: researchblogging.org, bipolar disorder, clinical depression, mental illness, mood disorder, functional genomics, blood test, biomarkers Image: Florida Department of Law Enforcement. According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, serious mental illnesses affect approximately 44 million Americans. Serious mental illnesses include mood disorders; depression and bipolar disorder. Unfortunately, correctly diagnosing mental illnesses,…

tags: gender bias in science, female scientists, science publishing, sexism, feminism I have been thinking about this problem of reviewer bias against female scientists and have a proposal: all scientists should either choose or be randomly assigned a gender-neutral first name, such as “Lee”, “Alex”, “Jordan”, “Reese” or “Ali” or something like that, followed by…

Women, Science and Writing

tags: researchblogging.org, Female Scientists, science publishing, science blogging, gender bias, sexism, feminism A microbiologist at work. Image: East Bay AWIS. In the wake of the Science Blogging Conference in North Carolina, which I was unable to attend due to financial reasons, The Scientist‘s blog published a piece today that asks “Do Women Blog About Science?”…

The Psychology Behind Wrapping Paper

tags: researchblogging.org, psychology, gift wrapping, wrapping paper, behavior, holidays, holidaze Besides bright lights, my favorite thing about the holidays is wrapping gifts. I love covering a boxed gift with colored papers (or even with plain brown paper bags), I get tremendous satisfaction from folding the paper so it makes precise corners and then I especially…

The Gift of Giving

tags: holidays, social relationships, gift-giving, psychology, behavioral evolution, evolution Since the holidays are upon us once more, I thought you would be interested to read about the psychology of gift-giving. In short, even though giving someone a gift is simple enough, the psychology behind this act is much more complex than most people realize.

tags: emotional health, mood, happiness, National Lottery “Money can’t buy happiness” as the old addage goes, and every once in awhile, that’s actually true, too. Yesterday, for example, I read an article based on scientific research that suggested that it’s the simple things in life that make people truly happy. Having lived a very simple,…

tags: researchblogging.org, treatment-emergent suicidal ideation, suicide, citalopram, celexa, SSRI, black box warning Despite what the news might have you believe, it is quite rare for a depressed person to exhibit increased suicidal thinking after they have begun treatment with an SSRI, such as citalopram (celexa). According to the statistics, so-called “treatment-emergent suicidal ideation” occurs only…

A couple days ago, I mentioned that I, along with several other blog writers, had been invited to participate in a conference call-interview with several experts who were going to discuss the topic of bipolar disorder with us so we could write about it on our blogs. Well, thanks to a friend here in NYC,…

Windows to the Soul

Swedish researchers claim that it may be possible to read a person’s personality by analyzing their irises. They studied 428 people and correlated iris patterns with warm-heartedness and trust or neuroticism and impulsiveness. The researchers looked at crypts (pits) and contraction furrows (lines curving around the outer edge of the iris), which are formed when…

I Should Be A Therapist!

Okay, you can stop laughing now, even though I agree with you that the title for this entry is rather amusing. This quiz is made even more hilarious if you knew the reason for my partial hiatus from my blog. Anyway, feel free to share your results and comments on this quiz below the fold.