Speciation

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Category archives for Speciation

tags: What, If Anything, Is Big Bird?, taxonomy, taxonomy, evolution, Grandicrocavis, Big Bird, flightless birds, ratites, humor, comedy, science humor, dinosaur humor, Mike Dickison, PechaKucha, Christchurch, streaming video Years ago, when Zoologist Mike Dickison was in the early stages of his PhD, he gave a joke presentation at a graduate student conference on the taxonomy…

Evolution in Action by AMNH

tags: Evolution in Action by AMNH, Congo River, fishes, AMNH, American Museum of Natural History, evolution, variation, biodiversity, Melanie Stiassny, streaming video This video tells the story of speciation in Central Africa’s roiling, rapid Lower Congo River. This river is home to an extraordinary assortment of fish — many truly bizarre. This new video by…

tags: Inside the Collections: Ichthyology at AMNH, fishes, AMNH, American Museum of Natural History, evolution, variation, biodiversity, Melanie Stiassny, streaming video This video is the first of a new series of behind-the-scenes looks at the collections at the American Museum of Natural History. In this video, Melanie Stiassny, Axelrod Research Curator in the Department of…

tags: reptiles, chameleon species, herpetology, Chris Raxworthy, research, American Museum of Natural History, AMNH, New York City, field research, nature, travel, Madagascar, speciation, streaming video With Madagascar containing nearly two-third’s of the world’s chameleon species, Christopher Raxworthy, Associate Curator of Herpetology at the American Museum of Natural History, recently embarked on an expedition to the…

tags: new species, biology, botany, orchid, tiniest orchid, Orchidaceae, Platystele, Lou Jost A close-up of the world’s smallest orchid, at just over 2mm from petal tip to petal tip. Image: Lou Jost. The world’s smallest orchid was discovered recently in a mountainous nature reserve in Ecuador by American botanist Lou Jost. Dr. Jost, a former…

Why Study the Tree of Life?

tags: Tree of Life, conservation, biodiversity, ecology, evolution, biology, statistics, teaching, streaming video This video presents a very brief glimpse into what I do as a professional researcher studying “my birds” — the parrots of the South Pacific Ocean (during those rare and beautiful times when I actually have a job!!). To say the least,…

tags: Tree of Life, conservation, biodiversity, ecology, evolution, biology, statistics, teaching, streaming video This video presents a very brief glimpse into what I do as a professional researcher studying “my birds” — the parrots of the South Pacific Ocean (during those rare and beautiful times when I actually have a job!!). It features interviews with…

tags: lories, Loriinae, Loriidae, ornithology, molecular biology, natural history museums A young pair of Meyer’s Lories (Lorikeets), Trichoglossus flavoviridis meyeri. Image: Iggino [larger view]. “Can you help us identify a mystery lory in our collection?” I was pleasantly surprised to find this email request from Donna Dittmann, Collections Manager and Museum Preparator for the Section…

tags: evolutionary biology, speciation, species flocks, molecular phylogeny, behavioral ecology, Synodontis species, squeaker catfish, cuckoo catfish, Lake Tanganyika, peer-reviewed paper The Cuckoo Catfish, Synodontis multipunctatus [Siluriformes: Mochokidae]. This is the only fish that is a known brood parasite. This is one of the species included in this newly-published study. Image: orphaned. One of the groups…

tags: evolutionary biology, mate choice, sex determination, genetic compatibility, behavioral ecology, Gouldian Finch, Erythrura gouldiae, peer-reviewed paper The three color morphs of Gouldian finches, Erythrura gouldiae. Image: Sarah Pryke, Macquarie University. Gouldian finches, Erythrura gouldiae, are small cavity-nesting passerines that are endemic to open savannahs adjacent to mangrove swamps in northern Australia. These finches eat…