Speciation

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Category archives for Speciation

tags: evolution, speciation, diversification rate, Zosterops, White-eyes, ornithology, birds, molecular phylogeny, South Pacific Islands The Splendid (Ranongga) White-eye, Zosterops splendidus, endemic to Ranongga Island in the Solomon Islands archipelago. This species’ home range is smaller than Manhattan Island. Image: Chris Filardi [larger view]. For many decades, the white-eyes (Family: Zosteropidae) were known as the “Great…

tags: evolution, honeyeaters, Meliphagidae, Mohoidae, birds, ornithology, birds, molecular phylogeny, extinct species, South Pacific Islands Two nectar-feeding birds from Hawai’i, the kioea (brown-streaked, in middle) and an o’o species (lower left), looked so much like nectar specialists from the western Pacific (two species on right) that taxonomists put them all in the same honeyeater family,…

tags: evolution, biogeography, ornithology, birds, avian Kolo Sunset. Photo credit: Christopher E. Filardi, American Museum of Natural History (Click on image for a larger picture). Two of my ornithologist colleagues, Chris Filardi and Rob Moyle, published a paper in the top-tier research journal, Nature. This paper is especially exciting because it shows that oceanic islands…

tags: ecology, exotic species, introduced species, non-native species, invasive species, monk parakeets, quaker parrots, Myiopsitta monachus, Michael A Russello, Michael L Avery, Timothy F Wright Monk (Quaker) parakeets, Myiopsitta monachus, with nest. Image: Arthur Grosset [larger view]. Invasive species are everywhere: from plants such as Scotch (English) broom, Cytisus scoparius, whose yellow flowers bloom prolifically…

tags: researchblogging.org, premature hair graying, autosomal dominant trait, genetics, horses, hair color, syntaxin-17, melanocortin-1 receptor, cis-acting regulatory mutation, melanoma, evolution This horse is in the process of losing its pigment. It will end up being all white by the time it is eight years old. Image: Horse Wallpaper [larger view]. Even though I have always…

tags: researchblogging.org, begging calls, brood parasitism, coevolution, learning, social shaping, ornithology, Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Chalcites basalis, Chrysococcyx basalis Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo, Chalcites (Chrysococcyx) basalis, Capertee Valley, NSW, Australia, September 2003. Image: Aviceda [larger view]. Brood parasites are birds, fish or insects that deceive unrelated animals of the same species or different species to care for their offspring.…

tags: researchblogging.org, evolution, speciation, ring species, phylogeography, landscape genetics, crimson rosella, Platycercus elegans, parrots, birds, Australia Crimson Rosella, Platycercus elegans. Image: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. One of the challenges facing those who believe that evolution cannot create new species is explaining the problem of “ring species.” Ring species are a group of geographically connected populations that…

tags: researchblogging.org, dichromatism, mating system, plumage color, sex allocation, eclectus parrots, Eclectus roratus, ornithology, birds, avian, parrots Elektra, my female Solomon Islands eclectus parrot, Eclectus roratus solomonensis. This is the smallest and most distinctively marked of all the subspecies of eclectus parrots. Image: GrrlScientist 4 July 2008 [larger view]. Some of you might recall the…

tags: researchblogging.org, speciation, adaptive radiation,

tags: evolution, beak and body size, Geospiza fortis, inbreeding, mating patterns, reproductive isolation, sexual imprinting A family tree depicts the evolution of the 14 species of “Darwin’s finches”. (The focus of this study, the Medium Ground Finch, Geospiza fortis, is denoted with a red dot). [larger image]. I have always been fascinated by the process…