biogeography

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Tag archives for biogeography

tags: evolution, biogeography, phylogeography, animals, Here Be Dragons, How the Study of Animal and Plant Distributions Revolutionized Our Views of Life and Earth, Dennis McCarthy, book review I’m happy: another book review of mine was just published, this time, by Science magazine. This book, Here Be Dragons: How the Study of Animal and Plant Distributions…

tags: Parrots the Universe and Everything, biogeography, lemurs, twig technology, conservation, endangered species, evolution, komodo dragons, kakapo, baiji, comedy, Douglas Adams, streaming video Douglas Adams was the best-selling British author and satirist who created The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy [DVD]. In this talk at UCSB recorded shortly before his tragic and untimely death, Adams…

tags: evolutionary biology, evolutionary biogeography, molecular biology, medicine, ectoparasite, orificial hirudiniasis, mucosal leech infestation, hirudinoids, leech, Tyrannobdella rex, public health, zoology, PLoS ONE, anatomy, phylogenetic analysis, taxonomy, researchblogging.org,peer-reviewed research, journal club Figure 1. Mucosally invasive hirudinoid leeches. Known from a wide variety of anatomical sites including eyes (A) as in this case involving Dinobdella ferox…

Why Evolution is True

tags: book review, Why Evolution is True, evolution, creationism, religion, scientific method, Jerry Coyne Considering the plethora of books about evolution out there, is it really necessary to publish yet another one? What can another book about evolution have to offer that previous books have not provided? This new book not only presents the latest…

tags: lories, Loriinae, Loriidae, ornithology, molecular biology, natural history museums A young pair of Meyer’s Lories (Lorikeets), Trichoglossus flavoviridis meyeri. Image: Iggino [larger view]. “Can you help us identify a mystery lory in our collection?” I was pleasantly surprised to find this email request from Donna Dittmann, Collections Manager and Museum Preparator for the Section…

Ratite Flight: Lost But Not Forgotten

tags: ratite, tinamous, evolution, biogeography, phylogenomics, convergence, flightlessness, Paleognath, homoplasy, vicariance White-throated Tinamou, Tinamus guttatus. Image: Wikipedia. New research suggests the ostriches, emus, rheas and other flightless birds known as ratites have lost the ability to fly many times, rather than just once, as long thought. Further, the ratites appear to form a group with…