speciation

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted)

Tag archives for speciation

tags: reptiles, chameleon species, herpetology, Chris Raxworthy, research, American Museum of Natural History, AMNH, New York City, field research, nature, travel, Madagascar, speciation, streaming video With Madagascar containing nearly two-third’s of the world’s chameleon species, Christopher Raxworthy, Associate Curator of Herpetology at the American Museum of Natural History, recently embarked on an expedition to the…

tags: lories, Loriinae, Loriidae, ornithology, molecular biology, natural history museums A young pair of Meyer’s Lories (Lorikeets), Trichoglossus flavoviridis meyeri. Image: Iggino [larger view]. “Can you help us identify a mystery lory in our collection?” I was pleasantly surprised to find this email request from Donna Dittmann, Collections Manager and Museum Preparator for the Section…

tags: evolutionary biology, speciation, species flocks, molecular phylogeny, behavioral ecology, Synodontis species, squeaker catfish, cuckoo catfish, Lake Tanganyika, peer-reviewed paper The Cuckoo Catfish, Synodontis multipunctatus [Siluriformes: Mochokidae]. This is the only fish that is a known brood parasite. This is one of the species included in this newly-published study. Image: orphaned. One of the groups…

tags: evolution, speciation, diversification rate, Zosterops, White-eyes, ornithology, birds, molecular phylogeny, South Pacific Islands The Splendid (Ranongga) White-eye, Zosterops splendidus, endemic to Ranongga Island in the Solomon Islands archipelago. This species’ home range is smaller than Manhattan Island. Image: Chris Filardi [larger view]. For many decades, the white-eyes (Family: Zosteropidae) were known as the “Great…

tags: researchblogging.org, evolution, speciation, ring species, phylogeography, landscape genetics, crimson rosella, Platycercus elegans, parrots, birds, Australia Crimson Rosella, Platycercus elegans. Image: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. One of the challenges facing those who believe that evolution cannot create new species is explaining the problem of “ring species.” Ring species are a group of geographically connected populations that…

tags: researchblogging.org, speciation, adaptive radiation,

tags: evolution, beak and body size, Geospiza fortis, inbreeding, mating patterns, reproductive isolation, sexual imprinting A family tree depicts the evolution of the 14 species of “Darwin’s finches”. (The focus of this study, the Medium Ground Finch, Geospiza fortis, is denoted with a red dot). [larger image]. I have always been fascinated by the process…

tags: How and Why Species Multiply, evolution, ecology, Darwin’s finches, Rosemary Grant, Peter Grant, book review Peter and Rosemary Grant have been studying the phenomenon of speciation in Darwin’s finches for 35 years, using every technique available to them from molecular biology to population ecology. They have written several books about various aspects of their…

tags: researchblogging.org, evolution, speciation, Pod Mrcaru lizard, Podarcis sicula, reptiles Pod Mrcaru lizard, Podarcis sicula. Image: Anthony Herrel (University of Antwerp) [larger view] Evolution has long been thought to occur slowly, due to small and gradual genetic changes that accumulate over millions of years until eventually, a new species arises. However, recent research has been…

Speciation in Birds

tags: Speciation in Birds, Trevor Price, book review, evolution, birds The question of what is a species and how they arise has generated numerous discussions and tremendous controversy throughout the decades. This interest is more than academic, as any bird watcher will tell you since the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) routinely splits one species into…