Respectful Insolence

Has it really been a whole year?

i-e7a12c3d2598161273c9ed31d61fe694-ClassicInsolence.jpgOne year ago today, I discovered a rather amusing bit of chicanery on the part of an old “friend,” namely J. B. Handley, the proprietor of and driving force behind Generation Rescue, the group that claims that all autism (not just some, not just some, but all) is a “misdiagnosis” for mercury poisoning. Given that today is one year later to the day, I thought it would be amusing to repost this. And, yes, one year later to the day, the domain oracknows.com still redirects to Generation Rescue, although, shamed, J. B. did stop having the domain autismdiva.com redirect to GR.

INTERNET SQUATTER: J. B. HANDLEY

I hadn’t been planning on posting today. Instead I had been intending to devote today solely to finishing up a pesky grant application that’s nearing completion but needs a lot of polishing. Unfortunately, something came up. I tell ya, I sleep in a bit on a day off before taking on the task of trying to finish a grant, wake up to check my e-mail, and what do I find?

A reader (whom I wish to thank publicly and profusely) tipping me off to a dirty trick, that’s what. This reader, apparently, mistakenly typed “www.oracknows.com” into her browser and found herself redirected to the Generation Rescue website, you remember, the site that states:

Generation Rescue believes that childhood neurological disorders such as autism, Asperger’s, ADHD/ADD, speech delay, sensory integration disorder, and many other developmental delays are all misdiagnoses for mercury poisoning.

I was actually somewhat surprised to learn of this little bit of tricky cybersquatting, mainly because less than a month ago I had stated in a post that I was thinking of moving over to a new blogging platform and hoped to do so before my first blogiversary. Around that same time, I had checked to see if the domain name oracknows.com was available (knowing that my blog had been around long enough and had become prominent enough that it’s possible someone else may have gotten there first). Foolishly enough, however, I didn’t go ahead and purchase it at the time, indecision being the order of the day (as it has been with regards to my radically redesigning my template or dumping Blogger). In any case, I knew instantly that whoever had pulled this trick must have done so quite recently. A little WHOIS search of the public registry of who owns this domain name was all it took to turn up the person who had registered the oracknows.com domain:

oracknows.com = [ 69.20.5.151 ]

Registrant:
GR
JB Handley
[ADDRESS DELETED by ORAC]
US
Email: jbh@spcap.com

Registrar Name….: REGISTER.COM INC.
Registrar Whois…: whois.register.com
Registrar Homepage: www.register.com
Domain Name: oracknows.com
Created on…………..: Thu Nov 03 2005
Expires on…………..: Mon Nov 03 2008
Record last updated on..: Thu Nov 03 2005
Administrative Contact:
GR
JB Handley
[ADDRESS DELETED by ORAC]
US
Phone: 1-[PHONE NUMBER DELETED by ORAC]
Email: jbh@spcap.com

Technical Contact:
Registercom
Domain Registrar
575 8th Avenue
New York NY 10018
US
Phone: 1-902-7492701
Email: domainregistrar@register.com

DNS Servers:
ns.rackspace.com
ns2.rackspace.com
Register your domain name at http://www.register.com

Well, well, well. Given where oracknows.com now directs surfers to, this shouldn’t come as any surprise, should it? After all, J. B. Handley of Generation Rescue has shown up here before in the comments, as you may recall, rather unhappy with some of my posts.

I couldn’t help but note that my post stating that I was thinking of moving to another blogging platform was made on October 28. Then, on November 3, J. B. Handley registered oracknows.com in his name and redirected all traffic to it to his Generation Rescue website. Apparently, J. B. is no longer content just to comment here occasionally when I point out that the evidence does not support his contention that mercury causes autism. Apparently, now he feels the need to trick people looking for my blog. This is particularly odd, given that, in the month or two prior to November 3, I hadn’t really written much at all about this topic. Not much was going on, and I had for the the time being moved on to other topics until quite recently.

In any case, the timing seems a little too convenient to be entirely coincidental, doesn’t it?

I did a little more digging. Who else, I asked, has irritated J. B. Handley by insisting on sound science and pointing out that clinical and basic scientific data do not support his conspiracy-mongering? Well, there’s Autism Diva, of course. So I looked up autismdiva.com. Yep, you guessed it. J. B. Handley bought that domain too:

autismdiva.com = [ 69.20.5.151 ]

Registrant:
GR
JB Handley
[ADDRESS DELETED by ORAC]
US
Email: jbh@spcap.com

Registrar Name….: REGISTER.COM INC.
Registrar Whois…: whois.register.com
Registrar Homepage: www.register.com
Domain Name: autismdiva.com
Created on…………..: Tue Nov 01 2005
Expires on…………..: Mon Nov 01 2010
Record last updated on..: Thu Nov 03 2005
Administrative Contact:
GR
JB Handley
[ADDRESS DELETED by ORAC]
US
Phone: 1-
[PHONE NUMBER DELETED by ORAC]
Email: jbh@spcap.com

Technical Contact:
Registercom
Domain Registrar
575 8th Avenue
New York NY 10018
US
Phone: 1-902-7492701
Email: domainregistrar@register.com

DNS Servers:
ns.rackspace.com
ns2.rackspace.com
Register your domain name at http://www.register.com

He redirected traffic to autismdiva.com to the Generation Rescue site as well.

Let’s see. Is there anyone else? Well, there’s SupportVaccination.org (which, unfortunately, seems to be “on permanent hiatus,” for reasons that I do not know). Guess what, though? J. B. Handley also bought supportvaccination.com and also redirected traffic to it to his own website.

I wonder what other domain names J. B. Handley has bought up in order to trick unwary surfers by directing them to Generation Rescue? Does anyone know a way to find out?

Tricks like this have traditionally been the province of spammers and Internet squatters, who buy up domain names that they believe a company or (or, relatively frequently, a political candidate) will want and then extort lots of money if that company or candidate wants to buy the domain name from them. Other uses of this tactic have been to set up attack or parody websites of the intended target that visitors end up at by mistake. One further variation is to buy up domain names that you would get with common typos of the target website. Personally, I highly doubt that Mr. Handley is after money from me, Autism Diva, or any other blogger that he doesn’t like. More likely, he just wants to direct readers looking for blogs that try to counter his mercury scaremongering to his own website. And, of course, he probably wants to prevent me from using oracknows.com myself if and when I ever finally decide to move my blog to a different platform and/or get my own host (something I may never do, for the simple reason that Blogger, despite its many flaws, remains the best deal in town because it’s free). Never mind that the mercury/autism controversy probably makes up way less than 5% of what I write about(if even that). No doubt J. B. had quite the self-satisfied chuckle when he did this and considers himself quite clever, but that Mr. Handley would stoop to such childish pranks for so little potential gain speaks volumes about him

Of course, scummy does not necessarily constitute illegal, and, of course, Mr. Handley did nothing illegal in purchasing these domains. Unfortunately, I probably have no recourse, other than to publicize his trick. I guess I have only myself to blame. I had been thinking of purchasing oracknows.com for several months but never quite got around to it. Consequently, my farting around allowed an Internet vulture like Mr. Handley snatch the domain name up first and use it for his own nefarious purposes. I wonder what some of Handley’s admirers would say about his behavior in this.

Probably nothing.

I would, however, point out to Handley’s supporters that you do have to wonder about someone who pulls a trick like this. Ask yourself: If Handley is willing to use a little deception in little things like this, doesn’t it make you wonder about his behavior in larger things? At the very least, what he has done is petty and childish.

The really funny thing about this is that Handley’s little prank was probably totally unnecessary, at least as far as preventing me from using oracknows.com goes. I’m probably going to stick with Blogger for at least a few more months, just with a different, far spiffier, template that I’m (very slowly) working on and hope to unveil by my blogiversary (assuming I can figure out how to work its many bugs out by then). Given that, I guess I can take satisfaction that I caused Mr. Handley to waste a small amount of his money registering that domain name and noting that he’d have to waste quite a bit more to keep me from using the same name with different extensions (.org, .info, .net, etc.). If I either fail to find a more productive hobby or my job fails to be all-consuming and I happen to be still blogging three years from now, it will be satisfying to think that Mr. Handley will have to waste even more money if he still wants to keep that domain name from me.

True, it’s not very much in the grand scheme of things, but it does still make me chuckle just a little bit.

Comments

  1. #1 Amy Alkon
    November 25, 2006

    The intellectually honest generally don’t do such things.

    I had something similar happen to me. Abraham Starchild Cherrix’ uncle was upset about some of my posts on the irresponsibility of his parents vis a vis having him take Hoxsey treatments, and the uncle bought up various forms of my name and threatened to use them.

    Idiot. I have an entertainment lawyer, and I’ve been through this before. I don’t know if this applies to you, but “right of publicity” applies to me. Here’s my blog post about it:

    http://www.advicegoddess.com/archives/2006/07/weenie_buys_up_1.html

  2. #2 Bob
    November 25, 2006

    Keep a record of that whois information, as apparently now this person is trying to hind behind “Domain Discreet”:

    Registrant:
    Domain Discreet
    ATTN: oracknows.com
    P.O. Box 278
    Yarmouth, NS B5A 4B2
    CA
    Email: 13e5deb30a1e6729017a3c58cbe9ecc3@domaindiscreet.com

  3. #3 Orac
    November 25, 2006

    Oh, I kept a record. JB was ignorant enough to register the domain under his own name and his home address. In fact, I had assumed that it was his business address and posted it in the original iteration of this post one year ago. Someone pointed out that it was his home address, and after I learned that I deleted the address and phone number.

  4. #4 Zeno
    November 25, 2006

    Alternative medicine is about to punch my family in the nose. My sister-in-law is “treating” a potentially malignant bowel obstruction with enemas recommended by a “natural” healer because her medical doctor just wants to cut her. As we all know, squirting liquid up your butt is more natural than surgery. I don’t blame her for being unhappy about surgery, but I do blame her for her invincible ignorance, which has the strong potential to cut short her life.

    Quackery in the family

  5. #5 mcewen
    November 25, 2006

    That’s a whole list of tricks for the unwary [inexperienced newbies] almost enough to make one retreat and hide away again.
    Best wishes
    http://whitterer-autism.blogspot.com

  6. #6 Dixon Ng
    November 27, 2006

    Found my way here from Alex’s blog (Dailytranscript).

    If anyone is picking up this week’s Newsweek, seems like they have a feature on autism.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15792806/site/newsweek/

    See especially the section near the end. This should make an interesting study.

  7. #7 isles
    November 27, 2006

    Dixon – The Swedo study might be interesting, but only as an illumination of how mercury-autism theorists can spin findings that disprove their belief. NIH may think it’s appeasing them, but if, as seems almost certain, the investigators find no improvement with chelation, the mercury militia will dismiss it as “oh, they didn’t use the right chelator” or “see, they didn’t add this supplement” or what-have-you.

    Of course, the ones who will have to pay for satisfying these curiosities are the autistic kids, who already probably have a hard enough time with parents who don’t like their being autistic and who surely do not need the hassle of a useless treatment regimen being imposed on them.

  8. #8 anonimouse
    November 27, 2006

    JB Handley is a useless blowhard and a complete waste of time. He’s barely one step above John Best, Jr.

  9. #9 Dixon Ng
    November 27, 2006

    Hi isles,

    That’s an interesting point about the study. I think ultimately what has to happen is that someone (the quarks) will get sued for these chelation therapies (fined or jailed) before the hysteria will settle.

    Has anyone looked into their own local autism support groups to see whether this type of thinking is actually prevalent? Or are we just seeing a relatively small representative of the parent population with autistic kids on the web?

    Dixon

  10. #10 Ms. Clark
    November 28, 2006

    Mr. Ng,

    Apparently, as far as local parent groups, the amount of belief in the mercury hypothesis varies alot. Sometimes one can read a mercury parent whining that no one in his area will talk chelation with him, and he has to travel so far to find a DAN! doctor to chelate the kid, sometimes one reads the opposite where a parent who doesn’t buy into the whole vaccine /mercury/chelation hysteria feels totally surrounded by DAN! parents who look down their noses at any one who doesn’t believe!!

    Chelation will probably fade into something else, before it was chelation there were other DAN! favorite cures (secretin?), they’ve tended to get more dangerous and more expensive (bigger profit margins for the creeps) over time, though. Next, maybe stem cells… one mom flew her child to China to get stem cells injected into his spinal fluid… didn’t work apparently…

    One thing that is very creepy about experimentation on autistic kids, is that, for instance at the UCD MIND institute they solicit donations from wealthy parents (grandparents) to fund any old experiment that is their hearts desire… so long as they can get it past the IRB and at the moment, it looks like the IRB is taking stupid pills…. never mind…
    So say Grandpa X says, “I wonder if scientifically unfounded, slightly dangerous experiment Q will help my little grandson? I know, I’ll fund a study at the MIND institute… they can try it out on local poor kids and then when they get the results I’ll know if it’s OK for our little Bobby.”

    Honestly, it could happen like that. Right now the MIND is trying to figure out a protocol that the IRB will approve to do hyperbaric oxygen on autistic kids. The big problem so far is having kids go in the (real) hyperbaric tank with no oxygen for the control condition.

    Never mind that the kind of HBOT that the parents are using now is different and much more dangerous…

    The IRB (lost their minds and?) approved of the methyl B12 injection study that they are doing now at the MIND. In my opinion, the fact that the IRB approved this was just sicko.

  11. #11 Ms. Clark
    November 28, 2006

    “The big problem so far is having kids go in the (real) hyperbaric tank with no oxygen for the control condition.”

    I don’t mean they are going to put them in an HBOT tank free of oxygen… I mean the control condition will be free of additional oxygen (above the usual levels in room air)… one has to be careful not to suggest things like suffocation for autism… people will try it.

    Also, it’s amazing what people will allow to be done to autistic kids but won’t allow to be done to typical kids, so sometimes they can’t get typical kids for controls… hmmmm. Better dead than autistic, but don’t harm the normal kids?

  12. #12 anonimouse
    November 28, 2006

    What I’m astonished by is that parents feel compelled to make their kids guinea pigs for these treatments that are not only implausible but potentially really, really dangerous. I think it’s a combination of parents who have been convinced that autism is so awful that you need to do anything to get rid of it – mixed with practitioners of said treatments that overstate the benefits and greatly dismiss the potential risks.

    I just don’t get it. Are autistic children so defective that we need to go to these lengths to “cure” them?

  13. #13 Regan
    December 4, 2006

    In my local autism “support” group, an informal survey found that 90% of the families are using alternative/DAN! therapies, and most, multiples. I know that among my circle of friends we are the only ones that are sticking to “parenting” therapy.

    I don’t know if these are respresentative stats.

    I do know that it is a real distraction in trying to work with people on more practical issues of educational advocacy or positive behavioral support or prohibition of restraint for the differently abled, since folks’ energies seem to be entirely sucked up chasing one pseudoscience based cure or another. I would take it more seriously, except that I have been watching serial alternative therapies by many of these families for years, and even anecdotally it seems that if something was going to have worked, it would have done so by now.

    Regan