Respectful Insolence

Some of these are hilarious, and, no, it wouldn’t be a good idea for these couples to do the hyphenated name thing. If you have any more real life examples, post ‘em in the comments for the amusement of all!

(Via Advice Goddess, who should know that less than two weeks ago I stayed at a hotel on Big Beaver Rd. in Troy, MI.)

Comments

  1. #1 Adrienne
    September 30, 2007

    Even “Big-Beaver” would be better than the “Beaver-Wetter” or “Looney-Warde” pairings. Just imagine the poor caterer trying valiantly not to laugh when booking the “Beaver Wetter wedding” over the phone.

  2. #2 Aerik
    September 30, 2007

    Welcome to Jay Leno’s unoriginal “headlines” skit he does every Monday night, Orac.

  3. #3 Amy Alkon
    September 30, 2007

    Did the hotel have red velvet walls and fringe on the lamps?

    Unfortunately, few people in Detroit seem to find the street name hiliarious. And actually, it’s in a rather boringly posh area.

  4. #4 Drat
    September 30, 2007

    One couple would definitely have trouble with their nuptials announcement if they got it in the order ‘Nye-Stitz’.

    The problem with ‘Beaver’ is that net nannies filter it out. Much to the dismay of Beaver College, which changed its name to Arcadia University — and that much to the chagrin of Beaver College graduates who have ‘Beaver’ on their resumes, job histories, college transcripts, and class rings.

    In Pennsylvania, there is Beaver County and Beaver Falls. Penn State’s Joe Paterno is the ruling king of Beaver Statdium. There is a Beaver State Park as well, and, yes, kids can see beavers there.

    Ruling out ‘beaver’ is a mistake.

  5. #5 Amy Alkon
    September 30, 2007

    Ruling out ‘beaver’ is a mistake.

    I think there are many, many men who would concur.

  6. #6 Amy Alkon
    September 30, 2007

    Professor Beaver teaches film at the University of Michigan.

  7. #7 ebohlman
    September 30, 2007

    Similar considerations apply to corporate mergers. Supposedly, Chatanooga’s two newspapers, the News and the Free Press merged into the Chatanooga News-Free Press. Then, of course, there’s the security firm with the less-than-confidence-inspiring name of Custer Battles (named after its founders).

  8. #8 Chris Devery
    September 30, 2007

    In a similar vein, two girls in the same class at the high school where my wife teaches were called Jenna Taylor and Jenna Toole. They followed each other in role call.

    What could their parents have been thinking?

  9. #9 Pinko Punko
    September 30, 2007

    Big Beaver Rd. is exit 69 I believe as well, at least on the way to Pontiac. It is of course, a classic.

  10. #10 Brian
    September 30, 2007

    No kidding – my high school english teacher Ms. Skidd married someone whose last name was Marks.

  11. #11 Carrie
    October 1, 2007

    As a lifelong Detroiter, I can definitely say that Big Beaver is quite an underwhelming road name.

    Then again, the town of “Hell” is less than an hour away. And no, you can’t get there by taking Big Beaver.

  12. #12 hoary puccoon
    October 1, 2007

    The most tragic one was the marriage of Miss Cindy Pleasant. She married a Mr. Crapps.

  13. #13 Richard Simons
    October 1, 2007

    I once worked with a Herr Katz and Fraulein Maus.

  14. #14 blf
    October 1, 2007

    Not quite the same thing, but one of my early teachers and I shared same the surname. This used to drive the school librarian batty, because books were checked by surnames of the person checking out the book and relevant teacher. So the librarian couldn’t tell if the teacher had checked out the book or I had.

    And then the next year (at a different school), there was another student with whom I shared the some prenom and surname (but different middle initial). However, we weren’t in the same class, and as far as I can now recall, the other “me” was a year ahead. Despite the obvious scope for confusion, I don’t remember any significant problems.

  15. #15 Graculus
    October 1, 2007

    The Victorian era called, it wants its middle-class posing back.

  16. #16 kai
    October 1, 2007

    Tangentially related: When Nottingham City University and the University of Nottingham-Trent were to merge the obvious name choice was City University of Nottingham-Trent, but somebody caught on in time…

  17. #17 Mark C. Chu-Carroll
    October 1, 2007

    Not quite the same idea, but my mother had a friend named “Marsha” in college, whe ended up marrying a guy named “Jerry Mallo”.

  18. #18 jypsy
    October 2, 2007

    Once had someone tell mew when they looked at my name (janet norman-bain) they read “Janet Normal-Brain”. Given that I have MS, AS and a seizure disorder, I got a good kick out of that irony…

  19. #19 littlespacegirl
    October 2, 2007

    We chose not to hyphen our names–we’re not British nobility (Close–but no cigars!) It would have had to be Wood-Murray–Murray-Wood sounds like a housing development!

    Beavers? They’re Canada’s national animal! How the heck are we supposed to Boulderize THAT one??????

  20. #20 tim gueguen
    October 2, 2007

    I have long denounced the practice of name hyphenation. The best practice is for a woman to retain her maiden name instead of creating some monstrosity composed of two often jarring when put together names. And it sounds damn pretentious anyways.

  21. #21 mooosey
    October 3, 2007

    If our names were hyphenated, my other half and I could have the surname Knight-Walker. Not rude, but perhaps only suitable if we were goths.:)

  22. #22 Organic Chemistry
    December 22, 2007

    My friend Michael Mann married a girl named Kim Black….we all thought that one was a “non-hyphenator”

  23. #23 sex shop
    December 22, 2007

    The Victorian era called, it wants its middle-class posing back.

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