Respectful Insolence

Dr. Emoto’s water woo metastasizes

Indiana Jones had a saying: “Snakes. Why’d it have to be snakes?” This line was most famously delivered in Raiders of the Lost Ark after he and his friend Sallah had opened the Well of Souls and were staring down into it. Sallah noticed that the ground appeared to be moving within; so Indy shined a light down the entrance, only to see thousands of snakes waiting for him at the bottom.

Sallah then drily observed, “Asps. Very dangerous. You go first.”

As we knew from earlier in the movie, Indiana Jones hated snakes and was afraid of them; so it was only natural that later in the movie he would encounter a floor literally writhing with thousands of them. So it was when I innocently picked up the latest issue of TIME Magazine and started perusing it yesterday. What to my fearfully wondering eyes should appear but an article entitled Mind over Chocolate. Because I like chocolate, I was curious and began reading:

Move over, organic, fair trade and free range–the latest in enlightened edibles is here: food with “embedded” positive intentions. While the idea isn’t new–cultures like the Navajo have been doing it for centuries–for-profit companies in the U.S. and Canada are catching on, infusing products with good vibes through meditation, prayer and even music.

My reaction was much like Indy’s: “Intent. Why’d it have to be intent?”

To which my imaginary companion replied, “Emoto. Very woo-ey. You go first.”

So I will, because as much as the whole concept of “intent” in various “alternative medicine” and other woo irritates the crap out of me, it also holds a bizarre fascination as well.

Before I go on to deal with these products, let’s take a trip back down memory lane to nearly two and a half years ago. That’s when I first encountered the infamous Dr. Emoto and his amazing water woo. Naturally, being the…pioneer that he is, a lot of this business of “imbuing” water and food with happy “intent” can trace back to him, at least as a business plan, given his H20m water. The long story is in the link immediately preceding this; the short story is that Dr. Emoto believes that water can somehow be altered by “vibrations” sent from someone focusing his or her intent upon it and that those vibrations leave behind residue of that intent that can then be imparted to the people who consume H20m. As “evidence” for this, Dr. Emoto cites “studies” (I’m using the term very loosely here, as you might imagine) in which he claims to be able to differentiate different ice crystals on the basis of whether “good” or “bad” intent had been directed at them. Being of an entrepreneurial bent, Dr. Emoto decided to scale up his focusing of intent on water into an industrial process, infusing the water with happy thoughts thusly:

There are several distinctive vibrational frequencies that are incorporated in each bottle of H2Om.

The First is the vibrational frequency of the label. The use of words, symbols and colors on the label create a specific vibratory frequency. Each bottle also contains the sanskrit symbol of the Absolute, “Om”. It also contains the vibratory frequencies of the words “Love” , “Perfect Health” , “Gratitude”, etc. written on the label in many of the world’s languages. This represents unity among people, a subconscious reminder that we are not alone on this planet. A specific color vibration has also been chosen for each bottle, this color coordinates with the corresponding chakra.

Next are the very important Interactive qualities of H2Om. Our Trademark slogan is “Think it while you drink it.”® We encourage you to connect to the intention inspiring words on the label, create your own intention, and literally, “Drink in ” the vibration inspired intentions you’ve created. This not only reverberates in your body, but out into the world as well. It also brings about an awareness that connecting with your humanity, food and water is a sacred grateful act. As you drink, take a moment to use the words, colors, music, and vibrations as a tool to create your own personal intention! Set your world in motion, then watch as the law of attraction goes to work for you. Visualize great, extraordinary, vivid, mental and spiritual creations. For the good of you, for the good of mankind, for the good of the planet. Drink in the vibrations as you absorb the crystal clear spring water, then resonate the positive energy throughout your day.

As a bonus, (in alignment of the concepts described above in Energy, Frequencies, and Resonance) we also introduce audio frequencies to the water through sound and music. After the bottling process is complete, we charge the water in the storage facility with sound and music that was created with specific intention in mind, also utilizing frequencies known for having restorative qualities, that have been used by health practitioners throughout history. Crystal Bowls, Acoustic Piano, Spoken Word, Ancient Healing Scales and more.

In other words, Dr. Emoto’s workers put certain words and symbols on the bottles of H20m, play music at it, and, apparently, think happy thoughts at it, all for your benefit. Of course, the bit about “encouraging you to connect to the intention” and “create your own” intention seems to be cheating a bit to me. Does the water transmit Dr. Emoto’s intent to those who drink it or not? If it does, then why should the drinker need to “create his own personal intent”? Isn’t Dr. Emoto’s intent powerful positive enough? And why couldn’t the drinker just imbue any old water with “intent”? Wouldn’t competing intents cancel each other out? Inquiring minds want to know! More importantly, what if Dr. Emoto or one of his workers has a bad day? Couldn’t that person poison all those happy thoughts of intent and either weaken the goodness of the water or even turn it evil? You know, if I were a worker at Dr. Emoto’s plant, I’d call in sick if I felt just a bit pissed off, with the rationale that I wouldn’t want to contaminate the water. I wonder if the foreman there would accept that as an excuse?

But I digress, although I can’t resist mentioning that, even before this, Dr. Emoto was branching out into the Muslim world to create Koranic Water. Be that as it may, our brief trip to Emoto Land was a fun digression, because it sets the stage for the woo that is to come.

In retrospect, I now realize that I should have been able to predict that Dr. Emoto’s water woo would metastasize, given that no bad idea from the world of woo ever stops at just one substance. Indeed, the TIME Magazine article identifies at least a couple of more:

At Creo Mundi, a Canadian maker of protein powder, employees gather around each shipment and state aloud the benefits they hope to imbue it with for their consumers–increased performance, balance and vitality. Intentional Chocolate, founded in 2007 by chocolatier Jim Walsh, uses a special recording device to capture the electromagnetic brain waves of meditating Tibetan monks; Walsh then exposes his confections to the recording for five days per batch.

Well, all right! Nothing like praying over some protein powder. However, I was very interested in how Intentional Chocolate captured those brainwaves of meditating Tibetan monks and then exposes his chocolate to them, so I went and found the Intentional Chocolate website, where Jim Walsh, the founder of the company, exclaims, “My intent is to reintroduce the ancient wisdom of embedding conscious intention and love into food.” Funny, I thought mothers for centuries had been embedding love into food. Of course, it wasn’t the kind of love that Walsh apparently means; it was simply the love of a mother for her family leading her to cook for them. Certainly it had nothing to do with “embedding” intention into the food, unless perhaps you count the old custom of saying grace before eating.

Be that as it may, like all woo-meisters, Walsh very much wants to show you that it’s all about the science, maaaaan by writing a section that has one of the best names on a woosite–I mean website–I’ve ever seen: Chocolate And Intention Research, which opines:

Intentional Chocolate™ and its research partner, the HESA Institute (www.hesainstitute.com) are leaders in the revolutionary new field of intentional nutrition proving that intention embedded into food can positively affect those who consume it.

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study that was published in the scientific peer-reviewed journal, Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing (October 2007) it was found that one ounce of Intentional Chocolate™ per day for three days increased subjects’ well-being, vigor and energy by an average of 67 percent and, in some cases, up to 1,000 percent, when compared to a control group…

“The mood-enhancing effects of the focused intentions embedded in Intentional Chocolate were successfully demonstrated in a statistically significant, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment, and published in a peer-reviewed medical journal (Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing).

Explore. Why’d it have to be Explore? And Radin. why’d it have to be Radin. And all so soon after my last encounter with Dean Radin late last week?

I was briefly confused by the reference to October 2007, as there is no October 2007 issue of Explore. Undeterred, I looked at the September 2007 issue and found this little “study” entitled Effects of Intentionally Enhanced Chocolate on Mood. I don’t know if it’s fortunate or unfortunate that I can’t count on someone shelling out $10 for me to get a copy of this study, but it’s a hoot to read the abstract. For one thing, there were only 62 people in the entire study, with four experimental groups. Although it’s claimed that the groups were matched for age, gender, and amount of chocolate consumed per week, that’s pretty hard to do with such a small number of subjects distributed among four different experimental groups. Just a couple of outliers could screw the matching up. In any case, three of the groups received chocolate that had been imbued with “intent” for “enhanced sense of energy, vigor, and well-being” by three different methods, while there was one control group that received “untreated” chocolate. Every day they filled out some sort of mood questionnaire, but on days three, four and five they consumed chocolate. The claimed finding was that mood improved more in the groups receiving the “intent”-laden chocolate. One thing I notice was that the overall p-value was only 0.04, barely statistically significant, which makes me wonder if they appropriately used ANOVA (which is designed for multiple comparisons) for their statistics with the appropriate post-test correction to correct for multiple comparisons, or whether they used a pairwise comparison using Student’s t-test, which is the wrong way to do multiple comparisons because it is far more prone to produce a “statistically significant” result by random chance alone. Whatever the case, the whole experiment is another example of Tooth Fairy Science. Even more amusingly, James Walsh is one of the investigators.

Gee, I wonder if he paid for the study. (I love it when I can send the conflict of interest charge right back at “alternative” medicine mavens.)

Most amusing of all is Radin’s explanation:

The effect seems to involve a form of energetic coherence which arises through the intentions of intensely focused and highly trained minds. Some speculate that such mind-matter interactions resemble the “observer effect” in quantum physics (i.e., observing a system changes that system.) This is one of several possible explanations for the observed effect that are currently under investigation.” (www.deanradin.com)

Quantum woo. Why’d it have to be quantum woo? But what else could it be? Once again, quantum effects, such as the “observer effect” don’t work the way woo-meisters like Radin think they do, especially at the macroscopic level. That doesn’t stop him from making this astoundingly brain dead analogy:

“If the Pope blessed water, everyone wants that water. But does it actually do something?” Radin asks. “The answer is yes, to a small extent.”

I suspect that it probably does about the same as what focusing “intent” on chocolate does: Nothing.

Still, I wondered exactly how Walsh thinks he’s recording the brainwaves and intent of meditating Tibetan monks and injecting them into his chocolate. Fortunately, Walsh is happy to explain on his blog:

I began looking for technology to restore its whole informational/intentional pattern. The research led me to the physics department of several major universities, including the University of Wisconsin. Expecting them to suggest new methods of restoring quantum coherence through non-local interactions, I was surprised when instead they talked about an existing technology. One perfected over 3000 years. Tibetan meditators, they told me, have consistently demonstrated mind-matter interactions and there are workable theories on how to embed and capture patterns of intentional coherence that stem from meditation – particularly long term meditators (practice apparently does make perfect!).

We tried it. We tested it. It worked.

I wonder who at the University of Wisconsin is having his or her work abused in this manner. Of course, it would be interesting to know exactly what this wondrous technology is and exactly how Mr. Walsh showed that it “worked,” whatever that means. He sure does have a lot of glowing testimonials, though!

If you don’t want chocolate, though, you could always head on over to Creo Mundi and check out its intent-laden line of products, such as Intentional™ Bamboo Tees and Intentional™ Hoodies. For you nasty, unbelieving skeptics out there, there’s even a FAQ that sites Masuru Emoto and tells you how “intent” is imbued in Creo Mundi clothing:

At its simplest explanation, it is the Power of Words and how words make us feel. The saying “sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” is completely untrue as no doubt many people have all experienced the pain of words at some point in their lives, either as children or as adults. At its most complex explanation, our concept is about quantum physics and the fact that everything is energy – and how high vibrational energy like that found in positive words affects the body. We have spent a lot of energy ourselves trying to understand how our concept works the past year. In the end, we realized that it really doesn’t matter how it works, just that it does for people who are open to possibilities. Perhaps it is our belief in the Power of Words that gives our shirts the energy. Perhaps it works for people because once they have the shirt on their subconscious starts looking for positive events to reinforce their belief. We don’t know. There are many experts out there that can perhaps explain the phenomenon. To us, all that matters is that we are already starting to see a difference in the lives of people who have tried the shirts with open minds.

More quantum woo. Why’d it have to be more quantum woo? Unfortunately, it’s also a heaping helping of The Secret as well.

I don’t know if I’m being a ridiculous optimist, but this infiltration of “Secret”-like “intention” into numerous products could be just the thing that destroys the movement. After all, familiarity breeds contempt, in this case much deserved, and the more products that bear these sort of nonsensical claims of “intent,” perhaps–just perhaps– the more people will view such claims for the pseudoscience they are. As the TIME Magazine article shows now:

Still, not everyone is keen on the idea of packaging spirituality. Once the profit motive comes into play, “it’s difficult to keep things pure,” says George Churinoff, a monk at Deer Park Buddhist Center in Oregon, Wis., who was involved with Intentional Chocolate in its early stages. “Then [the product] may not be blessed in any way with motivation except maybe to make money.”

And this would be different from Dr. Emoto’s H20m exactly how? In any case, here’s hoping that “intent” becomes the new “green,” a catchphrase in advertising that no longer means anything and that no one takes particularly seriously anymore. Be that as it may, I just thought of something. This whole “intent” thing could be a goldmine if done properly. It makes me wonder: What other products would you like to see imbued with “intent” and, even more important, what specific intent?

Comments

  1. #1 Phoenix Woman
    March 30, 2009

    This guy is hitting the blog circuit heavily. I got an e-mail from him asking me to try (and say nice things about) his choccy bits, probably because I’ve written about a non-woo-y chocolate (made by an outfit called Rogue Chocolatier, which puts out what will likely be the best chocolate you’ve ever tasted).

  2. #2 Faithful Reader
    March 30, 2009

    This is hilarious! I thought my love affair with chocolate was mutual, without any need for intermediaries! Heehee.

  3. #3 Sastra
    March 30, 2009

    At its simplest explanation, it is the Power of Words and how words make us feel. The saying “sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” is completely untrue as no doubt many people have all experienced the pain of words at some point in their lives, either as children or as adults. At its most complex explanation, our concept is about quantum physics and the fact that everything is energy – and how high vibrational energy like that found in positive words affects the body.

    Notice the bait ‘n switch in there re “the Power of Words?” They bait you with a normal, unremarkable interpretation of the idea that ‘words have power’ (when someone says something you don’t like, it can make you feel bad) and then blithely switch over to quantum woo and intentional magic, as if it’s all the same sort of thing. Pseudoscientists and the spiritual do this all the time: point to superficial resemblances between something accepted and something not accepted, and then pretend they have the same credibility, because one has seen the “deeper” connection between them.

    As for a new product with intent, I’d be happy if they just stuck with chocolate, and imbued it with the intention to lose weight.

  4. #4 natural cynic
    March 30, 2009

    I’ll believe this when they come out with one called “Restraint”, as in “eat only one”.

  5. #5 symball
    March 30, 2009

    re-restraint chocolate

    they have it’s called hersheys- it’s so effective I have only ever managed to eat one piece.

  6. #6 Uncle Dave
    March 30, 2009

    “…Once the profit motive comes into play, “it’s difficult to keep things pure,” says George Churinoff, a monk at Deer Park Buddhist Center in Oregon, Wis., who was involved with Intentional Chocolate in its early stages. “Then [the product] may not be blessed in any way with motivation except maybe to make money.”

    This must be the Bernie Madoff factor…

    As Donald Sutherland said in the movie Kelly’s Hero’s,
    “your hit’n me with those negative waves mannnn..”

  7. #7 Prometheus
    March 30, 2009

    I’m wondering how they manage to overcome the “intentions” of the poor plants and animals that go into their products. After all, I’m sure that the cacao tree wasn’t too pleased to have its seeds destroyed to make chocolate.

    The same thing goes for the protein powder – whether from animal or vegetable sources, I’m sure that the original “owners” of that protein were peeved that they were sacrificed to make protein powder.

    I would suggest that people who are concerned about intent impressed upon their food (or who even think it might occur) should abtain from all foods that were made from living organisms. This would eliminate all animal- and vegetable-based foods, as well as yeast (and other fungi) and bacteria. Viruses might be acceptable, since they do not appear to be “alive” when outside their host.

    This program of “intentionally conscious eating” should rapidly eliminate the concern for “intent” in foods within – I would estimate – less than a year.

    Prometheus

  8. #8 Dr. Kate
    March 30, 2009

    Is it just me, or does Dr. Emoto’s H2Om sound suspiciously like the mood slime from Ghostbusters II?

  9. #9 Bopeep
    March 30, 2009

    The “journal” Explore is available at Elsevier’s Science Direct website. Probably your institution’s library provides access to SD and thus Explore. If no, let me know.

  10. #10 Phoenix Woman
    March 30, 2009

    I feel a Depeche Mode parody coming on:

    Your own…intentional…chocolate…
    Something that really cares, something that’s there…

  11. #11 Epinephrine
    March 30, 2009

    or whether they used a pairwise comparison using Student’s t-test, which is the wrong way to do multiple comparisons because it is far more prone to produce a “statistically significant” result by random chance alone.

    To be fair, you can use t-tests so long as you correct the family-wise error rate by employing a Bonferroni-type correction, but they probably wouldn’t have bothered.

  12. #12 rob
    March 30, 2009

    didn’t jason biggs infuse a pie with good intentions in “american pie?”

  13. #13 wfjag
    March 30, 2009

    You almost had me, Orac. This is the plot line to Ghost Busters II. Substitute Emoto for Bill Murray and you can make Miss Liberty walk the streets of NYC.

  14. #14 Rowan
    March 30, 2009

    I really wish that purveyors of woo would learn the definition of the word, quantum. I don’t think it means what they think it means, especially when in this instance they refer to “the Power of Words”.

    Well, I strongly suggest they learn the meaning of words before using them.

  15. #15 SiMPel MYnd
    March 30, 2009

    Well, I do nothing but curse at the coffee machine until it spits out the first cup in the morning. And yet I still feel much better when I have my first cup. I must be doing it wrong…

  16. #16 Laurie
    March 30, 2009

    This reminds me of the ads for massage stones that are energetically tuned by shamans for specific practitioners.

    If you felt depressed after eating the chocolate, could you sue for malpractice?

  17. #17 Dragonflymother
    March 30, 2009

    I can not tell from this article if you understand the importance of organic & free trade chocolate.

    I agree with you on the “woo”.

    However, I have long been in support of organic & free trade chocolate verses slavery chocolate such as nestle & hershey & every other majour chocolate companies.

    This is not new information.
    Here, try this site…
    http://vision.ucsd.edu/~kbranson/stopchocolateslavery/index.html
    Then, if you choose to eat chocolate saturated in the blood of child slaves, you are at least making an informed decision.
    And, if you choose to consume slavery free chocolate labeled “organic” or “free trade”, you will know it has not a thing to do with “woo”.

    Thank You.
    DFM.

  18. #18 Merlin
    March 30, 2009

    Verily, the slogan, “Think it while you drink it.”® would not be half, nay, a tenth, as magically powerful did it not rhyme.

    (Clay) ;-)

  19. #19 Chayanov
    March 30, 2009

    Maybe I should start some sort of “pure” food business, where my food is pristine and uncontaminated by someone else’s thoughts.

  20. #20 Chris Noble
    March 30, 2009

    http://www.deanradin.com/papers/chocolate.pdf

    Cherry-picked results.
    Dodgy subgroup analysis.

    It is difficult to imagine a more pitiful attempt at a scientific paper.

  21. #21 MissyMiss
    March 30, 2009

    The power of words applied to clothing totally works! For instance, if I wear my Ramones t-shirt, I soon begin to feel all punk and cool.

  22. #22 rb
    March 30, 2009

    holy holy hell. what a load of crap that paper is. It would be laughable except it is such a scam.

  23. #23 Marcus Ranum
    March 30, 2009

    I am planning on offering a limited-availabilty intentionalized specialty ammunition in .308 Winchester calibre, .338 Lapua Magnum, and .50BMG. Our intent-workers will “encourage” the bullets to score clean CNS hits for quick kills at extreme ranges. The Happy Sniper Intentional Round(tm) will only be available to serving members of the military or law enforcement. We are also going to be offering a 9mm “Spray and Pray” round for hip-hop artists – stay tuned!!!

  24. #24 DLC
    March 30, 2009

    I’m sorry, but anyone who cites Dean Radin or John Mack as research sources automatically loses.

  25. #25 HolfordWatch
    March 31, 2009

    Explore is fabulous – I have derived as much entertainment and real world knowledge from it as reading the Amazon reviews for Latawnya, The Naughty Horse.

    Who can forget Dr Judith Petry’s moving letter on Extraordinary Knowing from Explore?

    We should be aware that there are consequences of… talking about instances of extraordinary knowing. When colleagues, staff, and patients recognize that we have abilities that go beyond the ordinary, they develop unrealistic expectations of us. We may be seen as sorcerers, witches, seers. Anger and resentment can result when things do not go as desired or expected. Being held to a higher standard than our colleagues who have not come out of the metaphysical closet is a heavy burden to carry.
    We each tune into nonphysical reality via our own unique frequency. Extrasensory knowing comes to us in ways most likely determined by our DNA: images, words, light, emotions, nonverbal communications…
    Our colleagues will not believe in our experiences or their own anymore than they could have been convinced, before the microscope was invented, that microbes exist and cause illness.
    Reality includes so much more than that which we perceive through our sense organs, yet it is only this to which we choose to give credence. I see the next paradigm shift in medicine as the era of interdimensional healing; when we are open and receptive to all the unseen forces that exist within and between energetic creations.

    It’s all love, intention, energy and esoterica, after all.

  26. #26 MartinB
    March 31, 2009

    Isn’t Dr. Emoto’s intent powerful positive enough? And why couldn’t the drinker just imbue any old water with “intent”? Wouldn’t competing intents cancel each other out?

    Orac, you are really not up-to-date in quantum physics. never heard of the new elementary particles – emoti-ons and intenti-ons?
    Obviously, during fabrication quantum coherence is created between the intenti-ons of the people treating the water and those of the water itself. If you drink the water with the right feelings, you attune your own intenti-ons with those in the bottle and by quantum interference with those of other people, leading to a globally coherent quantum state.

    Wow, that’s really easy – perhaps I should give up may job and make up woo?

  27. #27 Tsu Dho Nimh
    March 31, 2009

    What other products would you like to see imbued with “intent” and, even more important, what specific intent?

    Condoms? With lecherous intent?

  28. #28 wheatdogg
    March 31, 2009

    Alties have the same attention span a toddler. Copper bracelets, magnets, green tea, white tea, ginseng, megadoses of Vitamin C, acai berries, crystals, tachyonized water, energized water, super-water … the list goes on and on. Each one for a short time is the latest “natural” miracle cure/process/preventive. Meanwhile, the purveyors of said miracles make an embarrassingly large amount of money from the suckers who buy the crap.

    Maybe one of the impressed “intentions” on the water and foodstuffs is for the customer to open his/her wallet and empty it.

  29. #29 skeptyk
    March 31, 2009

    @symball: I’m w you. Hershey’s is nasty. Something about the sour milk processing?

  30. #30 Donna B.
    March 31, 2009

    I would like a ream of paper imbued and infused with positive thoughts of becoming the manuscript of a best-selling novel to be made into a blockbuster film.

    Is that asking too much?

  31. #31 Orac
    March 31, 2009

    Actually, I’d like to imbue the Word files on my computer containing my latest grant application with positive thoughts that it’s the greatest science ever and that the reviewers absolutely must fund it.

    My only question is whether the intent can survive the transformation into PDF files and the electronic transfer to the NIH.

  32. #32 Art
    March 31, 2009

    Once again I think your missing the point.

    Associating a product with health and feel-good thoughts and ideas sells. It is why the girl selling Coke on the TV cuts a vibrant, healthy and attractive figure. You could try using a filthy derelict with running sores, hacking cough, and wonky eye to sell a product but marketing research has shown it usually doesn’t work.

    On the other end: “At Creo Mundi, a Canadian maker of protein powder, employees gather around each shipment and state aloud the benefits they hope to imbue it with for their consumers–increased performance, balance and vitality.”

    It is pretty clear why this is done. It helps with worker relations, general moral, and cooperation. I worked with a company doing construction work that dedicated the first twenty minutes to a safety meeting, a short presentation and comment session about safety and what can be done to improve things, and a short motivational talk, rundown of what the plan for the day was and general hortatory call to take pride in our work and work together. It didn’t make the job heaven but it did serve to focus the minds on quality, safety and cooperation. I noticed that everyone seemed to get along a little better and attention to safety and detail was quite good.

    All these are in essence mind hacks. Associating your product to consumers as positive traits and ideas sells. Nobody really believes Coke is made by particularly youthful and attractive people. Saying prayers over a product is a gimmick that sells. Nothing more.

    Having the workers proclaim their positive intentions to a shipment of protein powder certainly doesn’t give the powder an magical powers. But it might be an effective mind hack to motivate workers to take pride in their work and pay attention to details. If this means the employees are happier, work better together, and fewer amputated fingers and rat droppings get into the mix it is a good thing.

    If the employer were to simply state that such collective positive expressions boosted productivity 3%, lowered the accident rate by 10%, and reduced the QA rejection rate of the product 7% the workers might feel manipulated. But framed as a quasi-religious ‘impression of good feelings’ into the product everyone goes along even if they think it is silly.

    Motivation and similar mind hacks work best when people are not reminded they are being manipulated.

  33. #33 Cynical Pediatrician
    March 31, 2009

    HolfordWatch wrote:
    “Reality includes so much more than that which we perceive through our sense organs, yet it is only this to which we choose to give credence. I see the next paradigm shift in medicine as the era of interdimensional healing; when we are open and receptive to all the unseen forces that exist within and between energetic creations.”

    I bet she thinks Buckaroo Banzai was a documentary.

  34. #34 CB
    March 31, 2009

    Apparently, Deepak Chopra’s new community website is INTENT.COM

    “what is your intent today?” Come join my blog and find mutual help!

  35. #35 Mu
    March 31, 2009

    Orac,

    the correct way to imbue brain waives into electronic files is to digitize them, then print them as a watermark with hidden font. This way they will be properly influencing the reviewers, at least as long as they are viewing the electronic version.
    The science is still out on whether or not the influence survives the transfer to another analog media (aka print). We are working with HP to optimize the printer drivers for influence transfer via printing of hidden fonts without actually transferring ink.

  36. #36 Chris Noble
    March 31, 2009

    Actually, I’d like to imbue the Word files on my computer containing my latest grant application with positive thoughts that it’s the greatest science ever and that the reviewers absolutely must fund it.

    My only question is whether the intent can survive the transformation into PDF files and the electronic transfer to the NIH.

    For only $9.99 you too can have the latest quantum homeopathic digital software. HomeoPathizer2009.

    Simply type your intentful message in the input field and press the “succuss” button until the desired level of potentization is achieved. Eventually only a single space character will remain which due to our patented lossless homeopathic compression algorithm contains all of the information in the original message. Now simply copy and paste this single space character into your document to imbue it with the desired intention.

    A free trial version of the program is attached in the following space character ” “.

  37. #37 Christophe Thill
    April 1, 2009

    Not sure the Emoto tratment of water is really useful, as any bottle of mineral water already has a label covered with positive words: good for your health, perfectly balanced, helps losing weight… Shouldn’t that be enough?

  38. #38 Marie
    April 1, 2009

    I really want an Om atom to be discovered so that their name finally makes sense (even if not the sort they want it to make). I wonder what H2Om would be like.

  39. #39 Joseph C.
    April 1, 2009

    My only question is whether the intent can survive the transformation into PDF files and the electronic transfer to the NIH.

    Succussion. You must do a traceroute to the IP address of the NIH server and then go and shake every damn router in between you and them. This is easier said than done. Ever tried to lift a Cisco 12000 or CRS-1? You’ll throw your back out and need thousands of dollars worth of acupuncture and distance healing.

  40. #40 Iya
    October 1, 2009

    love your blog; came across the same article in Times and it lead me to you. if you are still interested, i have obtained a copy of the “research”, but you can go straight to it:
    http://www.deanradin.com/papers/chocolate.pdf
    have fun reading it

  41. #41 George Thomas
    March 14, 2010

    Wonderful to see sch nonsense debunked so thoroughly!

  42. #42 George Thomas
    March 14, 2010

    Wonderful to see such nonsense debunked so thoroughly!

  43. #43 george21
    July 10, 2011

    I have seen ” water the great mystery ” that says the same like this one and on this documentary or pseudo-documentary was other scientists that says the same with Dr Emoto!! I don’t know if this is true or a big hoax but I know how many facts do u have in your article to prove that this is bullshit!!do u know how many??? zero is the answer!! u are only ironic with the claims of this documentary and with Dr Emoto but u don’t have not even 1 prove that this is a big hoax!
    Did u try to do the same experiment or do u know anyone that did it? if yes where is the photos??
    if this is a big hoax this is the way to prove it not with very good words and irony! I don’t know if this documentary is pseudo or pioneer science but I know that it have more facts to prove something than u, u have only the until now logic but not even one fact!

  44. #44 george21
    July 10, 2011

    I have seen ” water the great mystery ” that says the same like this one and on this documentary or pseudo-documentary was other scientists that says the same with Dr Emoto!! I don’t know if this is true or a big hoax but I know how many facts do u have in your article to prove that this is bullshit!!do u know how many??? zero is the answer!! u are only ironic with the claims of this documentary and with Dr Emoto but u don’t have not even 1 prove that this is a big hoax!
    Did u try to do the same experiment or do u know anyone that did it? if yes where is the photos??
    if this is a big hoax this is the way to prove it not with very good words and irony! I don’t know if this documentary is pseudo or pioneer science but I know that it have more facts to prove something than u, u have only the until now logic but not even one fact!

  45. #45 Antaeus Feldspar
    July 10, 2011

    Yo, George.

    First of all, posting on a thread that’s been dead for over a year is considered bad form.

    Second, your ranting demonstrates that you do not understand a fundamental principle of science called “the burden of proof.” Dr. Emoto’s claims are extraordinary; if they were proved to be true it would be a revolutionary scientific discovery. But when someone comes along, claiming, “Oh hey, guess what! I just revolutionized science!” do you think everyone is obliged to believe their claims until it’s proved otherwise? That’s not the way it works; it’s Emoto’s responsibility to prove that his work is more than “bullshit” (to use your own phrasing) rather than everyone else’s responsibility to prove that it’s bullshit and nothing more.

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