Respectful Insolence

Archives for June, 2010

When BP spills a cup of coffee

Sadly, this video rings all too true:

Let’s see. Now that I’m back from Chicago, having recently attended a major cancer meeting, not to mention having already blogged about the meeting, what to do next? Sure, the whole thing about Andrew Wakefield finding himself just one step away from appearing on Jeff Rense‘s or Alex Jones‘s radio show was amusing in the…

Thanks to my “friends” at Generation Rescue and Age of Autism, I’ve learned of something that is so absolutely appropriate, so perfect in its complete perfection (if you know what I mean), it brought a smile to my face. It turns out that anti-vaccine hero and martyr Andrew Wakefield, who has been so disgraced that…

Well, I’m home. As I’ve mentioned before, I attended the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago. Although one of the problems with ASCO, at least for surgeons like me, is that it is a meeting completely dominated by medical oncology. Quite frankly, not that much of what is presented…

The ASCO Meeting: The swag!

Orac is on his way home from the ASCO meeting in Chicago. Shockingly, he was so busy that he didn’t bother to write anything last night, his last night in Chicago. Fortunately, he found something from the archives that’s perfect for this occasion. This is something he wrote in 2007, after the last time he…

Orac is currently away at the ASCO meeting in Chicago. Shockingly, he was so busy that he didn’t bother to write anything last night. Fortunately, he found something from the archives that’s perfect for this occasion. Although it’s not about ASCO specifically, ASCO is an even bigger meeting. This was originally written in 2005 on…

Orac is currently away at the ASCO meeting in Chicago. Shockingly, he was so busy that he didn’t bother to write anything last night. Fortunately, he found something from the archives that’s perfect for this occasion. This was originally written in 2005 on the “old’ Respectful Insolence blog and then reposted in 2006. That’ means…

Is your life worth $24 at Waffle House?

I forgot to mention on Friday that I’m currently in Chicago attending the ASCO meeting. It’s a lot of fun seeing the latest that science-based medicine has to offer, although ASCO isn’t always my cup of tea. The reason is that it’s very heavily based in medical oncology and chemotherapy, and there aren’t a lot…

Since its very inception five years ago, The Huffington Post has been, to steal a phrase from Star Wars, a wretched hive of scum and villainy, at least when it comes to anything resembling medicine. Of course, that’s the problem. Very little, if anything, published in HuffPo resembles actual science-based medicine. The vast majority of…

It occurs to me that I haven’t written about this topic in quite a while, but a recent event makes me think that maybe now’s the time to revisit this topic. I’m referring to Holocaust denial. Newer readers may not know that part of what got me involved in online discussions back in the late…

First, it was anti-vaccine “martyr” Andrew Wakefield’s infamous 1998 Lancet paper. Then it was his equally incompetent 2009 NeuroToxicology paper. Now it’s Wakefield’s 2000 American Journal of Gastroenterology paper: Errata, Corrigenda and Retractions Am J Gastroenterol 2010; 105:1214; doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.149 Retraction: Enterocolitis in Children With Developmental Disorders A J Wakefield, A Anthony, S H Murch, M…

After diving into a heapin’ helpin’ of sheer craziness over the last week or two (well, except for yesterday, when I deconstructed an acupuncture study, which, while not crazy, certainly was misguided), I think it’s time for a bit of self-absorbed navel gazing. After all, isn’t that what bloggin’s all about? Oh, wait, that’s what…

A couple of weeks ago I made what I thought to be a rather obvious observation, namely that the anti-vaccine crank blog Age of Autism is anti-vaccine, not, as it claims, pro-safe vaccine. One bit of the copious evidence that belies the claim is the obsessive focus of that blog on Gardasil. Even if science…

Of all the “alternative” therapies out there, arguably the most studied is the modality known as acupuncture. Perhaps the reason is that, unlike homeopathy, which based on physics, chemistry, and biology alone is so implausible that, for it to “work,” huge swaths of well-established physics and chemistry would have to be shown to be not…