This morning, I was forced to do something that I rarely do, namely shut down a comment thread and ban a particularly noxious troll for sockpuppetry. The post in question dealt with one Michael J. Dochniak and his ridiculous and scientifically unsupportable notion (I refuse to dignify it by calling it a “hypothesis”) that Latex used in the packaging of some vaccines causes autism. In truth, I probably let that thread go on far longer than I should have. Also, I probably should have banned Mr. Dochniak a couple of months ago for repeating the same arguments again and again and again after being thoroughly slapped down by my science-based readers again and again and again and again. But I didn’t. And Mr. Dochniak is still not banned. Hopefully, given his level of discourse, he is not savvy enough to find this new post and thread, but you never know. Maybe he has a Google search set to his name.

To all my regulars who took part in refuting Mr. Dochniak, I salute you. I couldn’t do it and still write new posts. It just goes to show how a community can develop around a blog like this, and how I couldn’t really do it anymore without you.

Comments

  1. #1 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 16, 2011

    Krebiozen writes (#198), “The involvement of NF-κB points towards a possible mechanism. I don’t see that it supports the hypothesis that latex, or any other constituent of vaccines, causes autism.”

    MjD’s response:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    Excerpt from the abstract:

    Based on the function of these differentially expressed proteins, relevant studies on immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, nuclear factor kappa B signaling activation and cell cycle were conducted in both autistic and non-autistic children of this family. Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex (NRL) and that IgE-mediated cross-reactions could be triggered by Hevea brasiliensis (Hev-b) proteins in NRL, we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with NRL might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.

    MjD

  2. #2 T-reg
    November 16, 2011

    Mr. Dochniak, I see that you have taken to avoiding the part which is difficult for you to answer. So I shall present it again to you without distracting you with other points –

    I don’t see how that proves your assertion that latex is responsible for Autism; which is the primary reason why you were mentioned on this blog and the basic subject of your book which you have been passionately promoting here as “an essential read for”(among others) “scientists and medical professionals”.

  3. #3 T-reg
    November 16, 2011

    @MjD:
    Just for the record – anaphylaxis is a severe form of TYPE I hypersensitivity (allergy).
    No one is disputing that latex can’t cause allergies.

    Autism is an allergic phenomenon is, however, an unproven and baseless claim.

    I can see that you don’t understand that allergies are a subset of immunological phenomena – all allergies are immunological phenomena BUT all immunological phenomena are NOT allergies. Just because something causes allergies doesn’t make it a cause for other immunological phenomena.

    No matter what references you give to prove that latex can cause allergic reactions, they don’t link latex to autism.

    The moon is round (actually, a sphere) and cheese can be made into wheels (which are also round, thus wheels = spheres) thus the moon is made of cheese – hence proved.
    Yeah right!

  4. #4 Igor
    November 16, 2011

    You know, he spent 2 days droning on latex can cause allergies and allergies cause autism, therefor latex causes autism, that iit was only a matter of time before anything related to the an immunologic response was bound to cause allergies. In fact, given the fact that the whole point of vaccination is to provoke some form of immuno-response I am surprised he doesn’t just say that causes autism.

    With all that latex causing all that autism, should we even worry about Aluminum MJD? Latex doesn’t occur naturally, Aluminum does. Perhaps you will have an easier time waging an imaginary war on the Big Latex.

  5. #5 Prometheus
    November 16, 2011

    Before MjD builds up a head of steam over NF-kB, let me amplify what “Tartu85” stated. NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa – light chain enhancer of activated B-cells) is not limited to B-lymphocytes and, in fact, has been found in a wide variety of cell types.

    NF-kB is a ready-made transcriptional activator that is present in the cell in an inactive form and its activation can be triggered by a variety of stressors, such as oxidative damage, UV and ionising radiation, bacterial lipopolysaccharides and even cocaine. It is also apparent that NF-kB can be – and is – activated in many “non-stress” situations.

    Apart from its role in cell survival and the immune response, NF-kB is also important in cell proliferation and differentiation – especially during development [e.g. 1,2]. There are even studies showing that NF-kB transcriptional activation might be necessary for learning [3-5].

    So, finding an increase in NF-kB activity or transcription isn’t the “smoking gun” for inflammation it might seem.

    The “bottom line” is that biology – especially the biology of complex eukaryotes (like humans) is rarely as simple as some would like to believe.

    Prometheus

    References:

    [1] Bakkar N, Guttridge DC (April 2010). NF-kappaB signaling: a tale of two pathways in skeletal myogenesis. Physiol. Rev. 90(2):495-511.

    [2] Boyce BF, Yao Z, Xing L (Mar 2010). Functions of nuclear factor kappaB in bone. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 1192:367-75.

    [3] Gutierrez H, Davies AM (June 2011). Regulation of neural process growth, elaboration and structural plasticity by NF-κB. Trends Neurosci. 34(6):316-25.

    [4] Meffert MK, Chang JM, Wiltgen BJ, Fanselow MS, Baltimore D (October 2003). NF-kappa B functions in synaptic signaling and behavior. Nat. Neurosci. 6 (10): 1072–8.

    [5] Albensi BC, Mattson MP (2000). Evidence for the involvement of TNF and NF-κB in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Synapse 35 (2): 151–9.

  6. #6 novalox
    November 16, 2011

    @Prometheus

    Thanks for the explanation

  7. #7 Tartu85
    November 16, 2011

    There is a tangential relationship between NFkB and IgE, although NFkB is not directly involved in IgE signaling. But why is anti-latex IgE special, why not ragweed IgE or KLH IgE?

  8. #8 Prometheus
    November 16, 2011

    Tartu85:

    “But why is anti-latex IgE special, why not ragweed IgE or KLH IgE?”

    We’ve asked that question repeatedly – apparently, Mr. Dochniak believes that latex proteins are either [a] significantly more immunogenic than other proteins or [b] a more complex mixture of antigens than other natural or synthetic products or [c] both [a] AND [b].

    We know that he doesn’t feel injection is a critical feature of “latex-allergy-induced-autism” because he repeatedly (repetitively?) cites Shen et al (2011), in which the autistic children’s exposure to latex (multiple cases in a single family) was by exposure in the home and not by injection, let alone from vaccines.

    We also know that he doesn’t consider the developmental state important for the “damaging effects of latex”, as he has cited Foster’s 1999 Medical Hypotheses article, “Schizophrenia: The Latex Allergy Hypothesis”, in support of his argument, so apparently the developmental state of the subject only determines whether they get autism or schizophrenia from latex exposure.

    As for why he thinks that IgE to latex is more “autismogenic” than IgE to other antigens, I suspect that his poor grasp of immunology (he states in his latest book that IgG and IgM are part of the innate immune system) is to blame.

    Frankly, I don’t have the slightest idea why Mr. Dochniak is so convinced that latex proteins are singular in their ability to cause autism, and I don’t think he does, either.

    Prometheus

  9. #9 Tartu85
    November 16, 2011

    Prometheus, thank you for the response. I should have qualified my comment with “I fully realize that I will not convince MJD of anything by bringing up basic biology principles. But it rather pleases me to send him scurrying off to search PubMed and Google for further information about mast cell biology.”

  10. #10 madder
    November 16, 2011

    @Tartu85:

    Prometheus is right; MjD has no comprehension of why he’s focused on latex. In the previous thread on this topic, this was the best explanation he could offer. To my chagrin, he was unable to improve on this hilarity. It’s probably the funniest thing he has ever posted (does anyone else have a contender?), and it’s been downhill from there ever since. Now it’s just sad.

  11. #11 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 16, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#208), “I don’t have the slightest idea why Mr. Dochniak is so convinced that latex proteins are singular in their ability to cause autism, and I don’t think he does, either.”

    MjD’s response:

    The numerous latex-proteins are unique in their ability to cause atopy (i.e., many allergies) based on the their seconary, tertiary, and quatenary structure.

    MjD

  12. #12 herr doktor bimler
    November 16, 2011

    Knowing that the rubber tree is a member of the Euphorbia family, I went Googling to see if the latex from other Euphorbias can also be allergenic.
    Yes indeedy, including the familiar decorative Poinsettia, which contains many of the same proteins as rubber-tree latex.
    http://news.georgiahealth.edu/archives/137

    The rise in autism correlates with the growing popularity of poinsettias!* Indoor potplants cause autism! Buy my book!

    * Statement not intended to be factual.

  13. #13 herr doktor bimler
    November 16, 2011

    More Euphorbia speculation…
    The expansion of the poinsettia market in the 1920S and 1930s, leading up to Kanner’s recognition of ‘autism’ in 1940, is detailed here:
    http://articles.latimes.com/2008/dec/23/local/me-poinsettia23
    The promotion of poinsettias surged again in the 1960s and 1970s, in step with the ‘autism epidemic’. Connect the dots, people!

    I will go on to propose that allergic responses caused by sitting on any of the common garden Euphorbias should be called “ass-spurge’s syndrome”. Then I shall hang my head in shame and creep quietly away, apologising profusely.

  14. #14 Tartu85
    November 16, 2011

    @herr doktor bimler:
    [quote]Knowing that the rubber tree is a member of the Euphorbia family, I went Googling to see if the latex from other Euphorbias can also be allergenic.
    Yes indeedy, including the familiar decorative Poinsettia, which contains many of the same proteins as rubber-tree latex.
    http://news.georgiahealth.edu/archives/137

    The rise in autism correlates with the growing popularity of poinsettias!* Indoor potplants cause autism! Buy my book!

    * Statement not intended to be factual. [/quote]

    Shit! Christmas causes autism!

  15. #15 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 16, 2011

    Mr. bimler writes (#212), “Yes indeedy, including the familiar decorative Poinsettia, which contains many of the same proteins as rubber-tree latex.

    MjD’s response:

    Article describing several Hev-b proteins and their structural homology to endogenous/exogenous proteins.

    http://www.laboratoriosilesia.com/upfiles/sibi/P0807700.pdf

    MjD

  16. #16 Prometheus
    November 16, 2011

    MjD (#214):

    “Article describing several Hev-b proteins and their structural homology to endogenous/exogenous proteins.”

    The article:

    Dochniak, MJ (2007). Autism spectrum disorders – Exogenous protein insult. Medical Hypotheses. 69:545-549

    Why am I not surprised?

    Read my book! The conclusions in it are supported by my unreviewed pay-to-play articles in Medical Hypotheses!

    Circular reasoning? You be the judge.

    Prometheus

  17. #17 herr doktor bimler
    November 16, 2011

    Mr. bimler writes (#212),
    I don’t know who that Mr. bimler is but he sounds like a smart guy.

    That MJD, however, sounds like a scamming, spamming douchenozzle, since he has seized the opportunity to refer us to an irrelevant little science-fair report that makes no mention of poinsettias or other non-rubber-tree Euphorbias.

  18. #18 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 16, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#208), “Mr. Dochniak believes that latex proteins are either [a] significantly more immunogenic than other proteins or [b] a more complex mixture of antigens than other natural or synthetic products or [c] both [a] AND [b].”

    MjD’s response:

    Thank you Prometheus!

    MjD

  19. #19 ArtK
    November 16, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#208), “Mr. Dochniak believes that latex proteins are either [a] significantly more immunogenic than other proteins or [b] a more complex mixture of antigens than other natural or synthetic products or [c] both [a] AND [b].”

    MjD’s response:

    Thank you Prometheus!

    MjD

    Mr. Dochniak, I am very pleased to be able to award you your MNS. Master of the Non-Sequitur.

    So, which is it? [a], [b], [c] or something else?

  20. #20 Science Mom
    November 16, 2011

    In light of the last thread Dochniak hijacked to pimp his book, I do hope that our host has a pre-determined post count before locking this one. Because I (along with everyone else, assuredly) can see where this is going.

  21. #21 Prometheus
    November 16, 2011

    MjD (#217):

    “Thank you Prometheus!”

    He missed the point – none of his claims about latex proteins are true. There are proteins that are much more immunogenic than any or all of the latex proteins and there are commonly used natural products that are much more complex than the mixture found in latex.

    ArtK (#218):

    “Mr. Dochniak, I am very pleased to be able to award you your MNS. Master of the Non-Sequitur.”

    I’d suggest that, in addition, Mr. Dochniak be awarded his MC: Master of Cluelessness. He can’t even tell when he’s being insulted.

    This is getting pathetic – again. Mr. Dochniak is clearly a non-combatant in this battle of wits.

    Prometheus

  22. #22 Narad
    November 16, 2011

    Read my book! The conclusions in it are supported by my unreviewed pay-to-play articles in Medical Hypotheses!

    The Medical Hypotheses article lives on in the Google cache for those who don’t have institutional access or $31.50 to burn. Elsevier’s copyediting standards shine on, if this is any comparison (cuts off in § 21); a quick comparison suggests that they have faithfully reproduced the… idiosyncrasies. No, wait, authorial voice. That’s it.

    I don’t even have the heart to look at the articles that cite it at the moment.

  23. #23 Matthew Cline
    November 16, 2011

    @Prometheus:

    Frankly, I don’t have the slightest idea why Mr. Dochniak is so convinced that latex proteins are singular in their ability to cause autism,

    I have a guess as to the way MjD thinks that led him to believe that latex is special when it comes to being an allergen. (Let me make it clear that this isn’t the way I think)

    My guess as to how he thinks:

    A scientific paper isn’t going to mention a fact about the thing being studied unless the fact differentiates it from other similar things. For instance, a scientific paper involving mice isn’t going to mention that they need to breathe oxygen or drink water to keep living, because all mice are like that, so it isn’t worth mentioning. On the other hand, if a scientific paper says “these mice need to consume X in order to keep living”, the fact that it was worth mentioning must mean that this is something that makes them different from other mice.

    Now, lets apply that to scientific papers on latex as an allergen:

    * If the paper mentions that antibodies to latex can cross react, that must mean that antibodies to latex are more likely to cross react, or cross react to a greater degree, since if their cross reactivity is similar to other types of antigens, why bother mentioning it?

    * If the paper mentions secondary/tertiary/etc structure or latex proteins, there must be something special about those structures compared to the structures of other allergens, since if there wasn’t any difference, why bother mentioning it?

    * If the paper mentions that latex has a variety of different immunogenic molecules, then it must have a greater variety of different immunogenic molecules than other types of allergens, since if it had a similar amount of such molecules as other allergens, why bother mentioning it?

    A different angle to apply the same way of thinking: a typical scientific paper is going to mention one fact about the thing being studied, the thing that makes it different and interesting. For example, a paper on mice might say “the mice being studied have the ABC mutation”. One paper, one fact; easy, simple. But if you pick out a random scientific paper on latex as an allergen, it might mention a lot more than one fact about latex, which means that latex is a special, extra-strong allergen. In fact, any scientific paper on latex as an allergen is going to mention more than one fact about latex; iron-clad proof that latex is a special, extra-strong allergen.

    So, with this type of mindset, MjD has a hunch that there’s something special/different about latex, reads some scientific papers on latex as an allergen, and is simply blown away by how special and strong an allergen latex is. At this point, with his hunch proven correct, he doesn’t go on to learn about the immune system in general.

  24. #24 T-reg
    November 17, 2011

    @MjD:

    The numerous latex-proteins are unique in their ability to cause atopy (i.e., many allergies) based on the their seconary, tertiary, and quatenary structure.

    1. Atopy is a predisposition to have an IgE mediated allergic response to a wide variety of antigens.
    So, if a person is atopic he/she may be allergic to (among many things) latex. Atopy, in this case, caused the latex allergy NOT the other way around!

    Judging by how twisted your concept of causality is, I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that you believe that it is the lights in the sky at dawn which causes the sun to rise.

    2. There is nothing special about latex proteins having Primary, secondary and tertiary structures. ALL proteins have primary, secondary and tertiary structures and ALL those structures eventually determine the property of that protein and its interactions.

    I’d like to point out to you, once again, Mr. Dochniak that you are making an utter fool out of yourself by arguing with the ladies and gentlemen on this thread. Most of them are well versed professionals in this field or relevant allied fields while you lack even a basic understanding of it.

    You have written a book when you are barely acquainted with the alphabet (metaphorically). Your explanations here are, as expected, mere scribbles by a child who has just learnt how to use a pen. Your belief in having made a supreme discovery is the same as that of this child who having made a page-long-scribble believes that he has just made an immense contribution to literature. Unfortunately, only those who know what literature actually is will recognize the child’s mistaken belief.

  25. #25 blackheart
    November 17, 2011

    Krebiozen

    At least you managed to identify the authors of one of the papers you cite this time, that’s progress, well done. Next time a PMID would be useful.

    No worries if you can’t cut and paste I’ll try to be more helpful.

    Immune system dysfunction and inflammation may play a role in some cases of autism, no one is disputing that.

    I think I’d disagree with that. There’s seems to be a certain inertia in the UK medical establishment to acknowledge that position.

    As one of the studies you refer to concludes, “Viral and bacterial infections, hypoxia, or medication could affect both foetus and infant”. We already know that viral infections, such as maternal rubella, and medications, such as valproate, can affect the fetus. The involvement of NF-κB points towards a possible mechanism. I don’t see that it supports the hypothesis that latex, or any other constituent of vaccines, causes autism.

    Have I made that statement ? (Assumptions assumptions)
    I said it was an interesting hypothesis because ….. but there is a few more interesting tid bits of research.

    As others have pointed out, there is good epidemiological evidence that the the only connection between vaccines and autism is a negative one, in that they prevent infections that could otherwise cause autism in susceptible fetuses or infants.

    “As others” … I thought I pointed that out ? Which was confined so far to the measles vaccine….

    Remember those 500,000 infant female deaths associated with measles vaccine. The mechanism has yet to be established how this came about ? Something about the scheduling ?

    Interesting about vaccines having sex differentials ?

  26. #26 blackheart
    November 17, 2011

    Tartu85

    Blackheart, you know what would be more challenging?

    Finding someone to challenge me at an intellectual level ?

    Finding a disease state

    Autism as a disease state. Thanks. A rare admission.

    (or for that matter normal state)

    So you just didn’t read the neuroscience, the genetics or the blood analysis.

    Or your just completely ignoring them.

    Here you go again….

    Aberrant NF-KappaB Expression in Autism Spectrum Condition: A Mechanism for Neuroinflammation 2011

    Adam M. H. Young,1,2 Elaine Campbell,1 Sarah Lynch,1 John Suckling,3* and Simon J. Powis1

    1Bute Medical School, University of St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK

    2Autism Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

    3Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

    This article describes immunodetection and immunofluorescence measurements of NF-κB in human post-mortem samples of orbitofrontal cortex tissue donated to two independent centers: London Brain Bank, Kings College London, UK (ASC: n = 3, controls: n = 4) and Autism Tissue Program, Harvard Brain Bank, USA (ASC: n = 6, controls: n = 5). The hypothesis was that concentrations of NF-κB would be elevated, especially in activated microglia in ASC, and pH would be concomitantly reduced (i.e., acidification).

    Conclusion

    NF-κB is aberrantly expressed in the orbitofrontal cortex as indicated by measurements on post-mortem tissue from ASC patients, and particularly in highly activated microglia. This region is a locus of abnormal function in ASC that underlies the abnormal development of social and cognitive skills (Sabbagh, 2004).

    This is the first discovery of its kind that identifies a potential mechanism for neuroinflammation in ASC through increased expression of this pro-inflammatory molecule and the significant involvement of resident immune cells. The connection of this result to changes in intracellular acidity indicates an investigation of pH across the entire brain parenchyma in living patients.

    Whilst evidence of causal link remains to be established, the idea that the induction of inflammation via the NF-κB signaling cascade is observed in regions of the neocortex associated with behavioral and clinical symptoms of ASC gives credence and impetus to interventions focusing on this potential therapeutic target.

    —————————————————-

    Expression Profiling of Autism Candidate Genes during Human Brain Development Implicates Central Immune Signaling Pathways

    By implementing a biologically relevant approach, we identified a subset of highly expressed ASD-candidate genes from which interactome networks were derived. Strikingly, immune signaling through NFκB, Tnf, and Jnk was central to ASD networks at multiple levels of our analysis, and cell-type specific expression suggested glia—in addition to neurons—deserve consideration. This work provides integrated genomic evidence that ASD-implicated genes may converge on central cytokine signaling pathways.

    Table 1. GO enrichment analysis of the 11 genes shared by Autism, Schizophrenia, and Epilepsy.

    GO: 0032103 Positive regulation of response to external stimulus – Anxiety
    (Any process that activates, maintains or increases the rate of a response to an external stimulus).

    GO: 0031622 Positive regulation of fever – (Any process that activates or increases the frequency, rate, or extent of fever generation.)

    GO : 0031620 Regulation of fever generation

    GO: 0031650 Regulation of heat generation

    GO: 0031652 Positive Regulation of heat generation

    Shown at Table 3 Gene ontology enrichment of the 32 highly expressed Autism genes revealed four new GO categories representing two significant processes—immune system regulation and apoptosis

    GO: 0002682 Regulation of Immune System Process

    GO: 0006915 Apoptosis (cell death)

    GO: 0012501 Programmed cell death

    GO: 0031347 Regulation of defense response – (Any process that modulates the frequency, rate or extent of a defense response.)

    In the first central network (Figure 4), NFκB, Jnk, and Mapk are hubs. Network 2 from the highly enriched set also contains NFκB as a hub, in addition to Tnf, TgfB1 and Myc (Figure 5). Taken together, these enriched networks, which are the most inter-connected of all ASD-derived networks, have at their core fundamental cytokine signaling molecules not previously implicated as ASD susceptibility loci. These may serve as potential final common pathways through which the heterogeneous ASD-implicated genes ultimately converge. Moreover, this represents a third, independent level of analysis whereby the highly expressed ASD genes implicate immune signaling pathways that are not apparent when the full set of ASD-associated genes is considered.

    ———————————————–

    NF-κB and Autism
    A Study of Nuclear Transcription Factor-Kappa B in Childhood Autism
    We have noted significant increase in NF-κB DNA binding activity in peripheral blood samples of children with autism. When the fold increase of NF-κB in cases (n = 67) was compared with that of controls (n = 29), there was a significant difference (3.14 vs. 1.40, respectively; p

    Conclusion
    This finding has immense value in understanding many of the known biochemical changes reported in autism. As NF-κB is a response to stressors of several kinds and a master switch for many genes, autism may then arise at least in part from an NF-κB pathway gone awry.

  27. #27 lilady
    November 17, 2011

    @ T-Reg: I posted about Dochniak’s description of his son’s “allergic” attack…way back in May…on the other blog.

    Dochniak claims that his son, since diagnosed with “latex allergy induced regressive autism”, had an anaphylactic episode when he blew up a balloon at his second birthday party. He required a trip to a hospital E.R. for treatment to reverse the life-threatening reaction to latex. Dochniak further describes the treatment for “anaphylaxis” with an epinephrine shot, and the E.R. discharge instructions to use a nebulizer for to avoid additional “episodes”.

    I also commented that nebulizer treatments are prescribed for asthmatic attack prevention…not allergic anaphylaxis. As usual, Dochniak never defended his “story” and never replied to my posting.

    Other commenters added to my posting, “suggesting” to Dochniak that the powdery substance (talc?) packed in cheap balloons, when inhaled, was probably the cause of the wheezing/asthmatic-like attack. Again, Dochniak ignores any and all posts that debunk his “theory”.

    “Your belief in having made a supreme discovery is the same as that of this child who having made a page-long-scribble believes that he has just made an immense contribution to literature. Unfortunately, only those who know what literature actually is will recognize the child’s mistaken belief.”

    I’m reminded of my toddler, so delighted that she could read and show off her talents to mommy. We would “read” some of her favorite “Little Golden Books” each evening and she was able to link the pictures with some of the words and “fill in the blanks”. We never “challenged” her reading ability so as not to dampen her enthusiasm for reading. There were plenty of her crayon artwork that I also displayed as refrigerator art, as well.

  28. #28 blackheart
    November 17, 2011

    Prometheus

    in support of his argument, so apparently the developmental state of the subject only determines whether they get autism or schizophrenia from latex exposure.

    I’d imagine those of us with a more fluid intelligence able to see many intersections of gene expressions and schizophrenia and autism.

    GO enrichment analysis of the 11 genes shared by Autism, Schizophrenia, and Epilepsy.

    GO: 0032103 Positive regulation of response to external stimulus – Anxiety
    (Any process that activates, maintains or increases the rate of a response to an external stimulus).

    GO: 0031622 Positive regulation of fever – (Any process that activates or increases the frequency, rate, or extent of fever generation.)

    GO : 0031620 Regulation of fever generation

    GO: 0031650 Regulation of heat generation

    GO: 0031652 Positive Regulation of heat generation

    Autism shares 69 genes with schizophrenia / 43 epilepsy and 11 between all three.

  29. #29 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#220), “There are proteins that are much more immunogenic than any or all of the latex proteins and there are commonly used natural products that are much more complex than the mixture found in latex.

    MjD’s response:

    Not when it relates to contaminants in vaccines.

    Natural latex is a “natural product” that demands an FDA mandated warning-label on vaccine packaging.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  30. #30 T-reg
    November 17, 2011

    @Lilady: ha ha… I’m glad my comment (even though unintentional) made you reminisce such fond moments.

  31. #31 T-reg
    November 17, 2011

    I suppose Mr. Dochniak’s bad experience with his son’s condition spurred him into learning more about latex allergies.
    But, he has stretched it too far in trying to do what he is not trained/qualified to do.

    All these people who feel that their situation is similar to that of Galileo’s fail to realize that what was known in physics at that time was fairly limited and it was possible for a person with minimum training to do what he did, if he just applied his thought. Today, we know that Galileo was not entirely correct about his postulates on gravity. First came along Newton and then Einstein. Today, to make a new discovery in physics, you have to be up to date with the known laws of physics before you are in a position to make an actual discovery. In fact, to even make sense of what you are doing you need that base. To extend this metaphor further: Einstein is best remembered by the lay public for his theory of relativity. But his Nobel prize in physics was for his work on the photo-electric effect. The reason being that though his hypothesis was mathematically elegant and potentially explained a lot, it’s predictions were yet unverified in reality.
    This is precisely the problem with all the crank hypotheses notions – too many loose ends making it fall flat when even superficially scrutinized. And, MOST IMPORTANTLY, unverified in reality.
    So, when a genius like Einstein was not honoured for arguably his greatest contribution to science when he had no evidence to back it up, what makes these cranks think that they can pass off anything without proof?

  32. #32 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Lilady writes (#223), “I’m reminded of my toddler, so delighted that she could read and show off her talents to mommy. We would “read” some of her favorite “Little Golden Books” each evening and she was able to link the pictures with some of the words and “fill in the blanks”. We never “challenged” her reading ability so as not to dampen her enthusiasm for reading. There were plenty of her crayon artwork that I also displayed as refrigerator art, as well.

    MjD’s response:

    We love our children and want the best in life for them.

    We also want them protected from the harmful effects of disease.

    Vaccines are a medical marvel in the prevention of childhood diseases.

    Forced immunity through vaccination is in its infancy, we must continue to challenge medical science and never become fixated on its many successes while accepting its few failures.

    Vaccine continuous-improvement is imperative.

    Demand latex-free vaccines!

    MjD

  33. #33 blackheart
    November 17, 2011

    Michael

    Other commenters added to my posting, “suggesting” to Dochniak that the powdery substance (talc?) packed in cheap balloons, when inhaled, was probably the cause of the wheezing/asthmatic-like attack. Again, Dochniak ignores any and all posts that debunk his “theory”.

    Cornstarch not Talc.

    J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1994 Apr;93(4):751-8.
    Cornstarch powder on latex products is an allergen carrier.
    Tomazic VJ, Shampaine EL, Lamanna A, Withrow TJ, Adkinson NF Jr, Hamilton RG.
    Source

    Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Health Sciences Branch, Rockville, MD 20852.
    Abstract

    Allergic reactions of the upper respiratory tract during use of powdered latex rubber gloves have been recently associated with sensitivity to latex. We have studied the ability of cornstarch powder to bind latex proteins and evaluated allergenic properties of the bound protein. Allergenicity was determined by competitive inhibition of human anti-latex IgE binding to solid-phase latex antigen. Cornstarch extracted from powdered latex products and clean cornstarch exposed to latex protein extracts were evaluated in comparison with clean unexposed cornstarch. Both exposed cornstarch preparations inhibited specific binding of anti-latex IgE antibodies to latex proteins in a dose-response manner. Latex-exposed cornstarch diluted 50% vol/vol produced complete inhibition, whereas greater dilutions exhibited variable levels of inhibition, depending on the source of cornstarch-bound proteins, insolubilized latex proteins, and IgE antibody-containing human serum used. Cornstarch not exposed to latex had no inhibitory activity.

    The study demonstrates that cornstarch indeed binds allergenic latex proteins and supports the causative relationship between allergic reactions in individuals with latex sensitivity and the exposure to airborne particles from powdered latex products.

    —————————————————

    Some of us have personal experiences that correlate exactly with your experience.

    It is unfortunate that some posters are ignorant of some basic health and safety matters.

    Any allergic reaction that effects breathing is a medical emergency and must be treated as such.

  34. #34 lilady
    November 17, 2011

    Answer the questions I posed to you in May…about your son’s visit to the E.R. and why you lied about the circumstances. Fool.

  35. #35 Gray Falcon
    November 17, 2011

    MjD, have you ever considered the possibility that you might be wrong? You never answered that question.

  36. #36 Renate
    November 17, 2011

    Is it just me, or is MjD starting to sound like a broken record?

  37. #37 ArtK
    November 17, 2011

    @ 230

    Starting?

  38. #38 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    lilady writes (#228), “Answer the questions I posed to you in May…about your son’s visit to the E.R. and why you lied about the circumstances. Fool.

    MjD’s response:

    Chapter 4 (Adaptive Immunity), Allergies and Autism, Nova Science:

    Dain‘s pediatrician removed the natural-latex protective gloves from his hands after completing the examination. A wisp of powder floated into the air as the gloves were peeled off his hands and discarded into a waste basket next to the examination table. The pediatrician‘s eyes extensively scanned and sorted through several years of routine examinations. The silence that filled the room was interrupted by Dain‘s self calming hum as he strenuously rocked back and forth on the examination table. It was clear that Dain had dramatically regressed over the last several months. A forty word vocabulary was completely gone and social interactions were now replaced with repetitive self-stimulation. Dain‘s well defined muscles, on both arms and legs, gave an indication of the repetitive jumping and flapping behaviors which seemed to increase daily.

    Latex is dangerous, refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  39. #39 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#229), “MjD, have you ever considered the possibility that you might be wrong?”

    MjD’s response:

    Words like “wrong” or “right” are encompassing and absolute.

    My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  40. #40 Science Mom
    November 17, 2011

    My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    And what data have you gathered to that end? And if you are still in the process of something, then how do you justify making such definitive statements?*

    *rhetorical questions that will undoubtedly be answered with, “buy my book” and “refuse latex-contaminated vaccines”. Because we all know what the answers really are.

  41. #41 Gray Falcon
    November 17, 2011

    I am not talking right or wrong in the moral sense, I am talking right or wrong in the “2+2=5” sense. MjD, do you understand the concept of honesty?

  42. #42 Vicki
    November 17, 2011

    Actually, Einstein’s Nobel was “for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect.”

    As I understand it, this was a compromise with some specific members of the academy who disliked relativity. Yes, the photoelectric effect would have been worth a Nobel if Einstein had never published anything else, but he did, and the people giving the award were well aware of that. By the time the prize was awarded, general relativity had explained the orbit of Mercury, and the predictions about gravity bending light had been confirmed by measurements during a solar eclipse.

    If Einstein’s Nobel had been just for the photoelectric effect, with nobody thinking about relativity, it would likely have been awarded sooner. Say, in 1916, when no prize was given.

  43. #43 Calli Arcale
    November 17, 2011

    Mr Donchiak:

    My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Given that you clearly did not understand what the null hypothesis was until being schooled here, yet have done no apparent work (unless you are unaccountably withholding evidence of such work) or altered your claims one jot since that time, I very much doubt that this is so.

    So put your money where your mouth is — what have you done to test this hypothesis?

  44. #44 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.
    MjD

    No, you have not done this. This is a lie. The one thing you have demonstrated is that Michael Donchiack is a liar.

  45. #45 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Constant Mews writes (#244), “No, you have not done this. This is a lie. The one thing you have demonstrated is that Michael Donchiack is a liar”

    MjD’s response:

    Your liar, liar pants on fire attitude is disheartening.

    Please consider doing a Google search using the key words “Autism” and “Dochniak”. Much of the work I’ve done to prove the null hypothesis is well documented on the internet.

    MjD

  46. #46 Narad
    November 17, 2011

    Words like “wrong” or “right” are encompassing and absolute.

    As opposed to the careful nuance of intoning “refuse vaccines that have a latex warning” over and over again?

  47. #47 Science Mom
    November 17, 2011

    Please consider doing a Google search using the key words “Autism” and “Dochniak”. Much of the work I’ve done to prove the null hypothesis is well documented on the internet.

    No it isn’t and furthermore, in a discussion of science, you don’t pull the, “I ain’t your Googlemonkey” canard. The “internet” isn’t a valid citation, nor are there any citations for your “validation of the null” because a.)you don’t have a single shred of data and b.)you didn’t even know what the null hypothesis was until you were schooled on the last never-ending thread.

  48. #48 Gray Falcon
    November 17, 2011

    MjD, do you really think being evasive and dishonest will help your case?

  49. #49 Calli Arcale
    November 17, 2011

    Mr Donchiak:

    Please consider doing a Google search using the key words “Autism” and “Dochniak”. Much of the work I’ve done to prove the null hypothesis is well documented on the internet.

    Seriously, you don’t even know what you yourself has done? You have to ask others to Google it for you? The mind boggles.

  50. #50 lilady
    November 17, 2011

    Dochniak: You don’t need to be reminded about Chapter 1 of your book, do you? Here you lay claim to the onset of your son’s regressive autism related to an anaphylactic reaction to a balloon he came in contact with, at his 2nd birthday party:

    Chapter 1

    A time of anticipated celebration, a time of joy as brightly colored party balloons, wrapped gifts, paper plates, and inscribed napkins decorated picnic tables for family and friends gathered to share vanilla-frosted cake at Dain’s 2nd birthday. Dain playfully mouthed an inflated natural-latex balloon while others cheerfully watched and sang happy birthday. Within the balloon was an invasive danger that would soon severely threaten and change his life forever. Shortly after playing with the balloon, Dain’s health steadily regressed as his adaptive immune system recognized and attacked the natural-latex proteins that had transferred, through inhalation and dermal absorption, from the balloon and into his body. As the allergic response progressed and intensified his health worsened, frightened parents comforted their child as each labored breath failed to change the dark-purple color in his lips from oxygen starved blood. Rushed to the hospital emergency room, a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder. A mask supplied a steady stream of oxygen and intravenous tubes dripped essential fluids into his arm, rapidly turning his lips a safe pink color again allowing this atopic child to overcome a severe allergic reaction and live another day. Before leaving the hospital, a Doctor discussed his allergy situation. It was recommended that a nebulizer be used at home to relieve any recurrent asthmatic symptoms. The treatments helped his breathing but failed to address its underlying cause and progression – his adaptive immune system was hyper-active and out of control. Within a year, Dain would experience many more allergic manifestations and be diagnosed with Regressive Autism; thereafter helplessly locked forever in a world of behavioral atypicality.

    In the book titled, ‘Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The Latex Connection’ Michael believes that vaccines contributed to his son’s allergy-induced regressive autism. According to Autism Speaks, a non-profit public awareness organization, it’s estimated that one in every 110 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism and tens of millions are affected worldwide, making it more prevalent than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes, and pediatric AIDS combined. What actually causes autism is a complex and puzzling question, but atypical immunity is known to play a dominant role. Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection) focuses on the allergenic proteins found in Hevea brasiliensis, a dry natural rubber (HDNR) found in some vaccine packaging and delivery systems. Along with scientific reasoning, empirical studies are used to illustrate that exposure to the allergenic proteins from HDNR can affect the incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism. However, it’s expressed that the story is a hopeful one because the allergy-induced regressive autism rate does not have to be the inevitable result of immunization. HDNR exclusionary practice will dramatically reduce cases of allergy-induced regressive autism in future generations. The book is an essential read for parents, teachers, scientists, and medical professionals. Although they are likely to feel frustrated, be moved to anger, or experience a sense of betrayal, acute awareness of this important issue can only lead to a resolution. The message is loud and clear: the use of HDNR in vaccine packaging and delivery violates the first rule of medicine–do no harm.

    Riddle:

    Who will refuse to pay the vaccine-injury bill when the gates of truth are opened?

    I questioned you about the doctor’s advice upon discharge from the E.R. … in particular the nebulizer, instead of an epipen to abort another “anaphylactic” allergic reaction to latex.

    Do you not know the difference between an asthma attack and anaphylaxis? Apparently you don’t, because you use the words “asthma” and “anaphylaxis” interchangeably in your short description of your son’s E.R. visit.

    The treating E.R. doctor, on the other hand, was very specific about the use of a nebulizer at home, to avoid other episodes of ASTHMA.

    I also suggested that perhaps the excitement of the celebration, something your son ate at his party or any number of allergens, could have “triggered” his ASTHMA attack.

    You never replied to my questions about the number of injected vaccines from vials with latex ports, in syringes with latex plungers, he had received, prior to his 2nd birthday. My estimation is 3 DPT vaccines, 4 HIB vaccines, 3 Hepatitis B vaccines and 1 MMR vaccine. Why didn’t he have an anaphylactic reaction after each of these vaccines were administered? Why didn’t he have an anaphylactic attack in the E.R. when “a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder.”?

    Why should we believe any of your statements about your son’s latex induced regressive autism, when you so obviously avoid answering these questions, lie about your son’s ASTHMA attack and cannot offer any cogent explanations for your bogus theory?

    Liar.

  51. #51 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#248), “MjD, do you really think being evasive and dishonest will help your case?”

    MjD’s response:

    In clarification the latex/autism hypotheses are as follows:

    The hypothesis says the hevea-allergens cause allergy-induced regressive autism; and

    The null hypothesis says the hevea-allergens do not cause allergy-induced autism.

    This is non-evasive and honest.

    MjD

  52. #52 Calli Arcale
    November 17, 2011

    This is non-evasive and honest.

    Really? It doesn’t even answer the question being asked — which is whether or not you have actually tested these two hypotheses as you allege. Yes, it is evasive, and no, it is not honest, as it is becoming increasingly obvious that you have done no testing of any kind.

  53. #53 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    Your liar, liar pants on fire attitude is disheartening.
    Please consider doing a Google search using the key words “Autism” and “Dochniak”. Much of the work I’ve done to prove the null hypothesis is well documented on the internet.

    I have done this.

    You remain a liar. You have done NOTHING. I re-emphasize the word NOTHING to prove the null hypothesis. You don’t even really understand what a null hypothesis is to begin with.

    You remain a liar of the first order. You remain fundamentally ignorant of biology. You are a con-man and a fraud. These are matters of fact, not opinion.

  54. #54 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    As a simple demonstration that Dochniak is a liar and con-man, consider the top three results of a google search on “autism” and “Dochniak”.

    His book.

    His book that contains no research. His book that makes egregious, howlingly stupid errors in basic biology and physiology. His book that was written BEFORE this thread began. His book that contains no attempt to deal with the null hypothesis.

    Dochniak is a liar and a fraud, pure and simple.

    While I appreciate the amount of time and effort being brought to the table by everyone EXCEPT Dochniak, it is time wasted: he is sufficiently ignorant of biology that he cannot be educated, and he is merely using this thread to drive up his book sales.

    His non-existent book sales, by the way. Apparently no one is interested in buying his nonsense.

  55. #55 Beamup
    November 17, 2011

    Well, you CAN’T do anything to “prove” or “validate” the null hypothesis. You either reject it, or fail to reject it. If you do reject it, then that is taken as support for your alternative hypothesis.

    MJD now apparently knows the term, but he still doesn’t understand what it means or how it’s used.

  56. #56 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Constant Mews writes (#253), “You remain a liar of the first order. You remain fundamentally ignorant of biology. You are a con-man and a fraud. These are matters of fact, not opinion.”

    MjD’s response:

    Could you be alittle more specific?

    When Orac wrote in the introduction “To all my regulars who took part in refuting Mr. Dochniak, I salute you”.

    I’m not sure your post (#253) is what he means by refuting. Although I could be wrong on that point.

    MjD

  57. #57 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    Could you be alittle more specific?
    When Orac wrote in the introduction “To all my regulars who took part in refuting Mr. Dochniak, I salute you”.
    I’m not sure your post (#253) is what he means by refuting. Although I could be wrong on that point.

    Refutation of the unsupported, unverified personal opinions you offered has already been done.

    Correction of your heinous errors that indicate a fatal lack of understanding of biology coupled with gross ignorance of reason and logic has already been done.

    Demonstration that your claim that google would support that you have conducted research on your hypothesis (null or otherwise) is utterly false has now been done.

    Despite the fact that you have presented no coherent case; despite the fact that you have lied about your son’s experiences; despite the fact that you have lied about the research you have done; despite the fact that you have lied about your book; despite all this – you continue to make claims that have been falsified.

    This makes you a liar. You are here to raise your google count – but I caution you, this thread is soon going to be the first thing found in google when someone looks for you and autism.

    And it will show them three key facts: you are ignorant of science; you are a liar; and you are a fraud.

    Is that clear enough?

  58. #58 Stu
    November 17, 2011

    Non-existent book sales? I don’t think that’s true. SOMEONE bought it.

    “Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,968,491 in Books”

    The author bio is absolutely hilarious though.

  59. #59 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    Non-existent book sales? I don’t think that’s true. SOMEONE bought it.
    “Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,968,491 in Books”
    The author bio is absolutely hilarious though.

    True. I was speaking in relative terms. And yes, the bio is… more sad than anything. But it does begin with yet another falsehood: “Michael J. Dochniak is a leading researcher in allergy-induce regressive autism.”

    Since he appears to be the ONLY researcher in this non-existent field, he is being too modest.

  60. #60 Stu
    November 17, 2011

    CM: what takes the cake for me though:

    You spend a few hours whipping up something to put next to the creepiest lounge-lizard magician picture you can find, talking about your high school hockey, losing track of time, losing track of your objective, when you remember that you’re here to sell your delusional books, dangit, so let’s put a firm statement up top that tells the world you’re the authority on this stuff, dangit!

    And then you make a spelling error.

    Michael J. Dochniak: liar, fraud, honorary captain of the Failboat.

  61. #61 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 17, 2011

    Constant Mews writes (#257), “And it will show them three key facts: you are ignorant of science; you are a liar; and you are a fraud.

    MjD’s response:

    Keep the FDA latex-warnings on vaccines.

    Big Pharma shift to latex-free vaccines

    Continue to keep hospitals latex free.

    Biotechnology companies continue to develop processes that remove the hevea-allergens from natural-latex.

    Dunn and Dochniak continue to research the latex/allergy-induced autism connection.

    MjD

  62. #62 Anton P. Nym
    November 17, 2011

    Four days. This has been open for only four days. And we got 261 (well, now 262) comments. Yes, half of them are from the crank in question, but still…

    This thread reminds of the advice of noted medical expert LM Bujold; “Never give aversion therapy to a masochist. The results are unpredictable.”

    — Steve

    PS: Wish I knew why I keep coming back. Well, without the enticement of popcorn anyway.

  63. #63 Constant Mews
    November 17, 2011

    Keep the FDA latex-warnings on vaccines.

    Some people are allergic. Sure.

    Big Pharma shift to latex-free vaccines

    They’ve already done that, for the most part. You’re years behind, Dochniak.

    Continue to keep hospitals latex free.

    Because some folks have allergies. Sure.

    Biotechnology companies continue to develop processes that remove the hevea-allergens from natural-latex.

    If everyone is going latex free, what’s the point? You’re asking folks to waste money? Very stupid, Dochniak.

    Dunn and Dochniak continue to research the latex/allergy-induced autism connection.

    Another lie. You are doing no research. You don’t even understand enough basic biology to DO the research.

  64. #64 lilady
    November 17, 2011

    @ Stu: You cinched it for me (Creepy Lounge Lizard)= Mandrake the Magician Comic Book Character.

    Dochniak, Why do have so much time to post here? Why don’t you get a J-O-B?

    Why don’t you help take care of your disabled child?

    Why do you persist in this totally bogus theory and lie about your child’s disability.

    Pathetic excuse for a human being…and a pathological liar, as well.

  65. #65 Matthew Cline
    November 17, 2011

    My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Remember, MjD thinks that “validating the null hypothesis” means “eliminating all exposure to latex, then seeing what happens”. Thus, in his world, his efforts to reduce/ban the use of latex are efforts to validate the null hypothesis.

  66. #66 Prometheus
    November 17, 2011

    Dochniak (#239):

    “My efforts have been directed at validating the null hypothesis which says the hevea-allergens in natural-latex do not cause allergy-induced regressive autism.”

    After being educated – on this ‘blog – about what a “null hypothesis” is, Mr. Dochniak now claims that he is trying to validate it. And what, exactly, is he doing to “validate the null hypothesis”?

    At the heart of the problem is Mr. Dochniak’s (mis)understanding of the word “research”.

    Simply reading (and, generally, misunderstanding) the literature is not “research”. Generating new data through experimentation – even if it is simply “data mining” already collected data in order to find new relationships and patterns – is research.

    Mr. Dochniak’s claim to be “…a leading researcher in allergy-induced regressive autism.” is utterly false because he has never done any research in that (non-existent) field. In fact, he has never done any research on autism, latex allergies or autism-related immune dysfunction…ever!

    Now, back to Mr. Dochniak’s “null hypothesis” nonsense. He claims to be working to “validate the null hypothesis”, which doesn’t make much sense.

    As he has finally figured out, the null hypothesis in this case is the hypothesis that latex exposure from latex-stoppered vaccines does not cause autism. From Mr. Dochniak’s rambling responses, it appears that he thinks eliminating latex stoppers from vaccines could somehow “validate the null hypothesis”.

    Well, if latex stoppers were eliminated from vaccines and the autism prevalence was unchanged or increased, that would be pretty solid evidence that the “null hypothesis” (i.e. that latex stoppers in vaccines do not cause autism) was correct. However, that’s not the way the “null hypothesis” is used.

    As was explained by another reader (on the previous thread), the real utility of the “null hypothesis” is a means of “screening” data. If you find data – something you discover yourself or something found by another (real) researcher – the first question has to be “Is this more consistent with the hypothesis than it is with the null hypothesis?”

    For example, if Mr. Dochniak were to read a study where some (real) researchers found that latex proteins were more allergenic than other plant sap proteins, that – on first glance – might seem to support his hypothesis. However, it also supports the null hypothesis equally well, since it says nothing about autism.

    On the other hand, if a study showed that latex allergies were more common among autistic children than the general population, that would support Mr. Dochniak’s hypothesis much better than it supports the null hypothesis.

    Clearly, the null hypothesis is yet another scientific concept that Mr. Dochniak doesn’t understand – but now it’s something the rest of you do understand.

    Prometheus

  67. #67 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 19, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#242), “I am not talking right or wrong in the moral sense, I am talking right or wrong in the “2+2=5″ sense. MjD, do you understand the concept of honesty?”

    MjD’s response:

    2+2= 5 multiplied by four then divided by five.

    When an answer to a problem is presented, there are some who are frightened and stubbornly object.

    Refuse childhood vaccines that have a latex warning and reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism in future generations.

    MjD

  68. #68 liady
    November 19, 2011

    Dochniak…your credibility is “0” here. You failed in all respects related to your “theory”, your “research” and even your truthfulness about your child’s disability.

    Get a J.O.B., “man up” and take care of your disabled child.

    Utterly useless human being, pathetic excuse for a parent and a pathological liar.

  69. #69 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 19, 2011

    Anton P. Nym writes (#262), ” “Never give aversion therapy to a masochist. The results are unpredictable.”

    MjD’s response:

    In parallel, never give children latex contaminated vaccines. The results are unpredictable.

    MjD

  70. #70 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 19, 2011

    lilady writes (#250), “You never replied to my questions about the number of injected vaccines from vials with latex ports, in syringes with latex plungers, he had received, prior to his 2nd birthday. My estimation is 3 DPT vaccines, 4 HIB vaccines, 3 Hepatitis B vaccines and 1 MMR vaccine. Why didn’t he have an anaphylactic reaction after each of these vaccines were administered? Why didn’t he have an anaphylactic attack in the E.R. when “a nurse quickly injected adrenaline into his tiny shoulder.”?

    MjD’s response:

    It’s criminal that latex is still in some vaccines. The outcome is unpredictable.

    Thanks for your concern.

    MjD

  71. #71 lilady
    November 19, 2011

    Still not answering my questions, eh? Still an utterly useless human being, pathetic excuse for a parent and a pathological liar.

  72. #72 Antaeus Feldspar
    November 19, 2011

    It amazes me that Mikey the spammer actually quotes someone else’s quite reasonable questions to him, and follows it with “MjD’s response” where the response completely ignores the questions that he went to the trouble of quoting. It’s like the cowardly Brave Sir Robin from the Monty Python movie not just running away from danger, but having home movies taken of his cowardly retreat, and showing them to everyone wherever he goes.

  73. #73 lilady
    November 19, 2011

    @ Antaeus Feldspar: I will continue to ask those questions and Mikey will continue to avoid answering them…just as he has done since May, 2011.

  74. #74 Vicki
    November 19, 2011
  75. #75 Prometheus
    November 19, 2011

    MjD (disambiguated):

    “Refuse latex-containing vaccines!”

    “Read my book!

    “Try the veal – I’ll be here all decade (‘cuz I can’t find a job)!”

    He’s apparently decided that since he can’t dazzle us with his “fancy science talk” and we aren’t baffled by his bull**it citations, that his only recourse is to repeat – endlessly – his unsupported assertions and try to claim “victory” (see: Charlie Sheen saying “Winner!”) whenever he can misquote something that is tangentially related to latex or autism (or just allergies).

    The truly sad part is that Mr. Dochniak probably still thinks he’s right; that all of the data we’ve shown him and all of his errors we’ve pointed out are irrelevant because his cause is just, his motives pure and because he simply cannot be wrong.

    Good luck with that, Mr. Dochniak.

    Prometheus

  76. #76 blackheart
    November 21, 2011

    Obviously not a bad message

    http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9⊂=30#_ftnref10

    # 10 deaths each year are due to severe reactions to latex allergy. [10]

    “Anaphylaxis in the United States,” Archives of Internal Medicine, 2001

    Exposure to latex allergen alone is responsible for over 200 cases of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reactions) each year. [6]

    Approximately 4% of allergy sufferers have latex allergy as their primary allergy. An estimated 10% of healthcare works suffer from latex allergy.

    ———————————–

    UK Guidleines for Anaphylaxis Treatment and Response are found here …as comprehensive as any I’ve found.

    http://www.resus.org.uk/pages/reaction.pdf

    A diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction is likely if a patient who is exposed to a trigger (allergen) develops a sudden illness (usually within minutes of exposure) with rapidly progressing skin changes and life-threatening airway and/or breathing and/or circulation problems. The reaction is usually unexpected.

    The lack of any consistent clinical manifestation and a range of possible presentations cause diagnostic difficulty. Many patients with a genuine anaphylactic
    reaction are not given the correct treatment.

    ——————————

    Could save a life.

  77. #77 DrDuran
    November 21, 2011

    @Stu 260

    He’s not the Honorary captain of the Failboat, he’s the Captain of the Golgafrincham B-Ark!

  78. #78 LW
    November 21, 2011

    For those who missed it the first twenty-five times, please note that we have been reliably informed yet again that latex allergy exists and can be life-threatening. Which does not show either that the minute quantities of latex that might possibly be in a vaccine could cause or ever have caused such a result, nor that latex allergies (or any other allergies) have any causative connection to autism.

  79. #79 Narad
    November 21, 2011

    For those who missed it the first twenty-five times, please note that we have been reliably informed yet again that latex allergy exists and can be life-threatening.

    Well, sure, but the other times were unidimensional and crystallized, being of a single layer.

  80. #80 Dianne
    November 21, 2011

    I got my flu shot the other day. Because I have a mild contact sensitivity to latex, I was offered an alternative vaccine that contains no trace of latex…from a multi-dose vial that contains that evil mercury product! No hope for not becoming autistic this round, I guess.

  81. #81 Denice Walter
    November 21, 2011

    Oh well, since we’re in scifi theatre anyway…

    Let’s suppose that rates of autism have “risen” dramatically since. oh, let’s say 1994 and
    *simultaneously* medicine has greatly reduced its usage of latex ..
    which may have had a *protective* effect**. Hmmmmm?

    Devil’s advocate at your service.

    ** as I said,” in scifi theatre”.

  82. #82 LW
    November 21, 2011

    By the way, did you know lack of rock music causes asthma? It’s true.

    People with asthma have better high frequency hearing than people without. And people exposed to loud noises, like rock music, have worse high frequency hearing than people not exposed. Clearly, then, lack of rock music causes better high frequency hearing which causes asthma.

    Refuse quiet environments for your children! The outcome is unpredictable.

  83. #83 Anton P. Nym
    November 21, 2011

    Anton P. Nym writes (#262), ” “Never give aversion therapy to a masochist. The results are unpredictable.”

    MjD’s response:

    In parallel, never give children latex contaminated vaccines. The results are unpredictable.

    They’re not parallel at all. However, in order for my reply to be in parallel, I’m going to decline to say way and encourage you to buy the book to read the answer for yourself.

    Oh, and would it kill you to actually directly respond to questions instead of diverting to non sequitur territory and thereby missing the entire point? (I understand that the answer here may indeed be, “Yes,” but feel that it needs clarification even in that case.)

    — Steve (who really shouldn’t be replying, but can’t seem to help himself)

  84. #84 Constant Mews
    November 21, 2011

    2+2= 5 multiplied by four then divided by five.
    When an answer to a problem is presented, there are some who are frightened and stubbornly object.
    Refuse childhood vaccines that have a latex warning and reduce the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism in future generations.

    Dochniak, you are a pathological liar, a fraud, and a con-man. Fortunately, that it what the web is establishing as your searchable reputation. By continuing to post here, you increase the chances that people will know that you are a liar, a fraud, and a con-man. It will decrease your book sales.

    Remember: Michael Dochniak is a liar, a fraud, and a con-man.

  85. #85 lilady
    November 21, 2011

    I’ve been waiting (since May) for the answers to my question about Dochniak lying about his child’s E.R. visit at age two.

    Why doesn’t he “man up” and admit the child had an asthma attack and not an anaphylactic episode from contact with a balloon?

    Why hasn’t Dochniak replied to my questions about exposure his 2-year-old had, to vaccines with latex stoppers…administered via syringes with latex plungers…and why didn’t he have an anaphylactic reaction to the “adrenalin” given by those same type syringes administered in the E.R. for his ASTHMA ATTACK.

    I posed another set of questions to Dochniak on November 17th:

    Dochniak, Why do have so much time to post here? Why don’t you get a J-O-B?

    Why don’t you help take care of your disabled child?

    Why do you persist in this totally bogus theory and lie about your child’s disability?

  86. #86 lilady
    November 21, 2011

    “It will decrease your book sales.”

    Has Dochniak actually sold any copies of his book?

  87. #87 LW
    November 21, 2011

    “Why don’t you get a J-O-B?”

    Because employers know how to use Google.

  88. #88 Gray Falcon
    November 21, 2011

    2+2= 5 multiplied by four then divided by five.

    Okay, did he just try to weasel his way out of elementary arithmetic? Is he aware that “5 multiplied by four then divided by five” is not the same thing as five? What was he trying to accomplish?

  89. #89 Narad
    November 21, 2011

    I’m sure it’s covered in an appendix.

  90. #90 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 24, 2011

    On this day of thanksgiving, I’d like to recognize the FDA for requiring latex-warnings on childhood vaccines.

    MjD

  91. #91 lilady
    November 24, 2011

    On this day of Thanksgiving, I’d like to thank MJD for not bothering us anymore.

  92. #92 TBruce
    November 24, 2011

    On this day of Thanksgiving, I’d like to thank MJD for not bothering us anymore.

    Oh, I don’t know about that. A turkey is always welcome on Thanksgiving.

  93. #93 T-reg
    November 24, 2011

    I wish you all a happy Thanksgiving.

  94. #94 Prometheus
    November 24, 2011

    An extensive literature search revealed three case-reports of allergic reaction in latex-sensitive patients after receiving medications (one vaccine) from latex-stoppered vials. The most recent was 1999. There is no argument that people with latex allergies might react to the infinitesimal amount of latex in a medication vial with a latex closure.

    What is still in dispute is whether latex – in any form, by any route – can cause, trigger or precipitate autism. So far, the only person advancing this claim has steadfastly resisted all requests for supporting data.

    On this holiday, let us all be thankful that we are not so rigidly dogmatic that we cannot distinguish between what we want to be true and what the data support.

    Prometheus

  95. #95 lilady
    November 24, 2011

    TBruce: You can’t soar like an eagle when you hang out with turkeys…(lyrics by Daggersmith)

  96. #96 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 25, 2011

    Promethesus writes (#294), “There is no argument that people with latex allergies might react to the infinitesimal amount of latex in a medication vial with a latex closure.”

    MjD’s response:

    The safety of even an “infinitesimal amount of latex” in a child’s vaccine is still in dispute.

    It is well known that vaccinations shift immunity towards Th2. The presence of hevea-allergen contaminants from latex, which can bind to vaccine adjuvants(e.g., aluminum hydroxide), make such vaccines a first contact situation increasing the possibility of acquiring latex sensitivity.

    MjD

  97. #97 Chris
    November 25, 2011

    Get help. Contact your local mental health outpatient clinic, please.

  98. #98 Constant Mews
    November 25, 2011

    Dochniak said:

    The safety of even an “infinitesimal amount of latex” in a child’s vaccine is still in dispute.
    It is well known that vaccinations shift immunity towards Th2. The presence of hevea-allergen contaminants from latex, which can bind to vaccine adjuvants(e.g., aluminum hydroxide), make such vaccines a first contact situation increasing the possibility of acquiring latex sensitivity.

    Which simply continues to confirm that Dochniak is a liar, fraud, and con-man; too pig-ignorant of basic biology to have an informed opinion; author of books that no one reads.

    Dochniak, you’re a liar and a fraud. You are probably mentally ill. Do get some help.

  99. #99 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 25, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#294), “There is no argument that people with latex allergies might react to the infinitesimal amount of latex in a medication vial with a latex closure.”

    MjD’s response:

    Using Prometheus’ statement as a platform, it is logical to continue with the following statements:

    1) There is no argument that children with atopy might react to the infinitesimal amount of latex in a vaccine; and

    2) There is no argument that any child might react to the infinitesimal amount of latex in a vaccine.

    Let’s be honest about latex warnings on vaccines, it’s about child safety. Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  100. #100 Antaeus Feldspar
    November 25, 2011

    Stop spamming, Mikey. Get psychological help.

  101. #101 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 25, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#294), “What is still in dispute is whether latex – in any form, by any route – can cause, trigger or precipitate autism. So far, the only person advancing this claim has steadfastly resisted all requests for supporting data.”

    MjD’s response:

    I strongly disagree and resubmit the following reference as evidence that other scientists are close to solving the mystery of autism.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957522

    Prometheus, I’m surprised that you continue to ignored this data.

    MjD

  102. #102 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 25, 2011

    Antaeus Feldspar writes (#300), “Stop spamming, Mikey. Get psychological help.”

    MjD’s response:

    Enough with the psychological help everyone, your driving me crazy. Please…….

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.
    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.
    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  103. #104 Gray Falcon
    November 26, 2011

    MjD, you’ve posted that study dozens of times. What happened each time you did so?

  104. #105 Michael J Dochniak
    November 26, 2011

    In the site below, Sanofi Pasteur fails to disclose that latex is present in some of their child vaccines.

    http://www.vaccines.com/vaccine-safety.cfm

    Furthermore, the FDA has forced Sanofi Pasteur to place latex warnings on some of their child vaccines.

    http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/news/214867-fda-warns-of-latex-reactions-from-flu-vaccines

    It’s apparent that Sanofi Pasteur continues to ignore the adverse health affects of latex tainted vaccines (e.g., allergy-induced regressive autism).

    MjD

  105. #106 Antaeus Feldspar
    November 26, 2011

    Stop spamming, Mikey. Get professional help.

  106. #107 Science Mom
    November 26, 2011

    Prometheus, I’m surprised that you continue to ignored this data.

    He hasn’t ignored it at all, in fact has thoroughly disproven that it has anything to do with latex allergies causing autism. A simple fact that you continue to ignore.

  107. #108 Prometheus
    November 26, 2011

    MjD (again):

    “Prometheus, I’m surprised that you continue to ignored this data [Shen et al, 2011].”

    Mr. Dochniak, I’m surprised that you don’t recall that I’ve addressed the Shen et al (2011) study no less than three times. Do you have some sort of memory problem? I’ll go through it one last time, so pay attention and take notes.

    Shen et al studies a single Chinese family with three autistic children (2 male, 1 female) and three “neurotypical” children (all female). The authors took B-lymphocytes from each child and immortalised them with EBV to establish cell cultures. They then extracted the proteins from the cells and analysed them using a 500 spot antibody microarray chipset from Clontech.

    They then compared two sets of siblings – a 3 yr-old autistic female with a 2 yr-old non-autistic female and a 4 yr-old autistic male with a 5 yr-old non-autistic female. They give no explanation why the 1 yr-old non-autistic female and the 6 yr-old autistic male were not part of any comparison, or why they didn’t do cross-comparisons, but suffice it to say that these omissions do not help the validity of their conclusions.

    From these pairwise comparisons, they found several dozen proteins that were present in different amounts (39 in the first pair; 92 in the second pair); however, only four were common between the two pairs. That is, although comparing one autistic sibling to one non-autistic sibling generated a set of over thirty proteins that had different concentrations, the two sets only had four proteins in common. And remember, there were two siblings whose results were never compared (or were compared but were not reported).

    They also measured the total IgE levels – in the lysate of the cultured B-lymphocytes – but apparently not in the children’s blood. And they don’t mention if this IgE had any unusual affinity for latex proteins – a significant oversight, given their later claims.

    So far, so bad. The authors of Shen et al have committed the usual errors of “newby” microarray users. But then they step off the precipice and claim – based solely on the fact that the parents own a natural rubber production company, that latex exposure caused the observed differences and – even more surprisingly – resulted in autism.

    This is a “bridge too far” by any measure. Even arguing that autism is the cause of the observed protein concentration differences is quite a stretch, since they only showed two pairwise comparisons. To even make the claim that there is a difference (let alone causation) would require showing that the differences between the non-autistic and autistic siblings (all of them) was greater than the difference within the two groups – which they most certainly did not show.

    To then leap to the remarkable claim that latex exposure might be the cause of autism, based on this flimsy data, is beyond “a bridge too far” – it is as if the Allies, instead of trying to capture the Arnhem bridge in Holland, had planned to capture the Moltke bridge in Berlin.

    It is more likely that the results the authors report, if they are not spurious, show that autism causes immune system abnormalities, not that it is caused by them. Far more likely, given the things the authors do not report, is that their findings are spurious. Given the problems in the experimental design and the extremely small number of subjects, it would be charitable to call their results, “provisional”. This is probably why they refer to their study – in the title of the article – as a “pilot study”.

    Despite all this – and despite having been told all this before – Mr. Dochinak continues to make this study the linch-pin of his argument. I suspect it is because Shen et al flattered Mr. Dochniak by citing his fact-free 2007 Medical Hypotheses “study”.

    So, Mr. Dochniak, I haven’t “ignored” the data – I’ve discussed it and shown you why it isn’t relevant to your claims. No doubt your response will be:

    “Refuse latex-containing vaccines!”

    “Read my book!”

    “Prometheus is a poopy-head!”

    Standing by for predictable non sequitur from MjD.

    Prometheus

    P.S.: I’ve finally given up and ordered Mr. Dochniak’s book. I will not only be reading it, I will be posting a detailed discussion of the book on my ‘blog. Be careful what you wish for, Mr. Dochniak.

  108. #109 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 26, 2011

    Science Mom writes (#307), “He (Prometheus) hasn’t ignored it at all, in fact has thoroughly disproven that it has anything to do with latex allergies causing autism. A simple fact that you continue to ignore.”

    MjD’s response:

    I know Prometheus is a smart man but he hasn’t, in my opinion, thoroughly disproven the the hevea-allergens cause atypical immunity and a subset of autism which has been described as allergy-induced regressive autism. In the contrary, Prometheus has eloquently used the phrase “still in dispute” (#294).

    Science Mom, when are you going to try and thoroughly disprove the latex/autism connection on your exciting vaccine blog titled “Just the Vax”?

    MjD

  109. #110 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 26, 2011

    Dear Prometheus,

    In message #294 you state, “What is still in dispute is whether latex – in any form, by any route – can cause, trigger or precipitate autism. So far, the only person advancing this claim has steadfastly resisted all requests for supporting data.”

    It appears your the one who has forgotten that Shen et al., (2011) are scientists also acquiring data on the latex/autism connection. See Prometheus’ rant in message #308.

    I’m not the only one Prometheus XVI.

    MjD

  110. #111 Chris
    November 26, 2011

    Get some real psychiatric help, Mr. Dochniak.

  111. #112 The Christian Cynic
    November 26, 2011

    Anyone else think of this?

  112. #113 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 26, 2011

    A poem to help reduce the tension:

    Allergy-induced regressive autism within
    If we continue to ignore latex-contaminated vaccine spin
    Failure to adapt
    Failure to comprehend
    Mankind gets confused, in the mind with time
    Earth becomes a prison of tainted vaccines

    MJD

  113. #114 W. Kevin Vicklund
    November 26, 2011

    It appears your the one who has forgotten that Shen et al., (2011) are scientists also acquiring data on the latex/autism connection.

    No, it appears that Shen et al. are scientists who forgot to acquire data on the (imagined) latex/autism connection.

  114. #115 Gray Falcon
    November 26, 2011

    MjD, do you understand how evidence works? Here’s an example: If I accused you of committing murder, would it be up to you to prove your innocence, or me to prove your guilt?

  115. #116 The Christian Cynic
    November 27, 2011

    That may be the worst poem I’ve ever read. Wow.

  116. #117 herr doktor bimler
    November 27, 2011

    The Latex theory and the equally-plausible Poinsettia theory now receive some blog-space here:
    http://eusa-riddled.blogspot.com/2011/11/rubber-baby-buggy-bumpers.html

  117. #118 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 27, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#), “I’ve finally given up and ordered Mr. Dochniak’s book. I will not only be reading it, I will be posting a detailed discussion of the book on my ‘blog. Be careful what you wish for, Mr. Dochniak.”

    MjD’s response:

    Hevea brasiliensis natural-rubber (i.e., natural latex) is a monumental medical-disaster.

    Soon, we’ll read in the blog “Photon in the Darkness” if Prometheus has the courage to confront it.

    MjD

  118. #119 Prometheus
    November 27, 2011

    MjD (#310):

    “It appears your [sic] the one who has forgotten that Shen et al., (2011) are scientists also acquiring data on the latex/autism connection.”

    See my critique of their conclusions at #308. In short, their data do not support the conclusion that latex causes autism, something they obliquely acknowledge in their discussion.

    MjD (#318):

    “Hevea brasiliensis natural-rubber (i.e., natural latex) is a monumental medical-disaster. Soon, we’ll read in the blog ‘Photon in the Darkness’ if Prometheus has the courage to confront it.”

    Mr. Dochniak seems to be “framing” this in such a way that if I fail to agree with his “hypothesis” after reading his book, it will reflect a lack of courage on my part rather than a lack of data on his part.

    Nice try, Mr. Dochniak, but you can’t make this about whether or not I have the “courage” to accept your “truth”. If you can’t support your assertions on this ‘blog, I seriously doubt that you will have supported them in your book.

    However, I intend to give Mr. Dochniak’s book a fair reading and then critique how well it supports the assertions he makes. “Courage” is not required, as I intend to let the chips fall where they may. If – contrary to all impressions he has made on this ‘blog – the book presents data that support Mr. Dochniak’s assertions, I will put that on my ‘blog.

    Mr. Dochniak keeps trying to make this about personalities and “feelings”, which it is not. I don’t care if Mr. Dochniak is a loathsome human being or a saint – if he doesn’t have data to support his arguments, they are just his opinion and worth no more attention than his preferences in food or drink. If he does have data to support his arguments, then we have something to discuss.

    To date, the “data” he has brought to the table have been lacking – I can only hope (against all reason) that his book has more substance than his arguments on this ‘bog.

    Prometheus

  119. #120 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 27, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#319), “Mr. Dochniak keeps trying to make this about personalities and “feelings”, which it is not. I don’t care if Mr. Dochniak is a loathsome human being or a saint – if he doesn’t have data to support his arguments, they are just his opinion and worth no more attention than his preferences in food or drink.”

    MjD’s response:

    Enough said, read the book.

    MjD

  120. #121 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 28, 2011
  121. #122 Prometheus
    November 28, 2011

    MjD (#321):

    “lilady, can you politely tell me what this individual is trying to say?”

    Well, I’m not “lilady”, but I’ll take a stab at it.

    Dr. Gernsbacher, in this article in APS, is saying that people who graduate with a bachelor’s degree in psychology should have learned all of the things she outlines, including how to not confuse correlation with causation, the impact of a small sample size and sampling biases on validity, etc.

    Clearly, as we have seen on this ‘blog, not every psychology major learned these things, even though they may have been taught them.

    Prometheus

  122. #123 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 28, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#322), “…how to not confuse correlation with causation, the impact of a small sample size and sampling biases on validity, etc.”

    MjD’s response:

    A nurse acquaintence of mine here in Minnesota has 4 children wherein 3 are autistic (2 girls, 1 boy). As a nurse she was often exposed to the hevea-allergens and the children were most likely immunized with vaccines inclusive with latex. Based on recent evidence that atypical immunity (i.e., latex sensitivity) can affect neurological development, it’s reasonable to hypothesize that repeated hevea-allergen exposure during pregnancy, and during infancy, may have affected the occurance of autism in this family.

    MjD

  123. #124 Mrs. Woo
    November 28, 2011

    Mr. MjD – are you providing an example to Prometheus to demonstrate you understand “confuse correlation with causation” or to demonstrate you understand what “small sample size” means in “the impact of a small sample size and sampling biases”?

    Wait! I’m sorry – you were demonstrating “sampling biases” for him to be sure you understand the point. My bad.

    I expected to see you again – you are doing your level best to live up to “thread that never ends.” Hope you enjoyed the Thanksgiving holiday? My autistic grandson spent the entire weekend with us – I forgot how much he can wear me out!

    Oh – by the way – to the best of my knowledge he has no latex issues…

    Mrs Woo

  124. #125 Prometheus
    November 28, 2011

    MjD (#323):

    “A nurse acquaintence of mine here in Minnesota has 4 children wherein 3 are autistic (2 girls, 1 boy). As a nurse she was often exposed to the hevea-allergens and the children were most likely immunized with vaccines inclusive with latex.”

    I wasn’t going to come right out and say that Mr. Dochniak was one of those psychology undergrads who didn’t learn the lessons Dr. Gernsbacher discussed, but here he goes out of his way to show that he understands neither “correlation does not equal causation” nor the effect of a sample size of one.

    As a thought experiment, consider how Mr. Dochniak’s anecdote would be equally supportive of the hypothesis that autism is the result of genetics.

    Prometheus

  125. #126 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    November 28, 2011

    A nurse acquaintence of mine here in Minnesota has 4 children wherein 3 are autistic (2 girls, 1 boy). As a nurse she was often exposed to the hevea-allergens and the children were most likely immunized with vaccines inclusive with latex.

    Hey, I’ve got a correlation for you—they all had the same mother! (And more than likely, father.) Since autism is genetic or congenital* in most cases, I don’t think we need to look any farther.

    *A point some people miss is that the trait of providing an intrauterine environment conducive to autism can also be genetic, and come from either parent.

  126. #127 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 28, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#325), “As a thought experiment, consider how Mr. Dochniak’s anecdote would be equally supportive of the hypothesis that autism is the result of genetics.”

    MjD’s response:

    To my knowledge, there is no diagnosis of autism in past family history.

    Genetic – Unlikely

    Epigenetic – Maybe

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  127. #128 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    November 28, 2011

    As a thought experiment, consider how Mr. Dochniak’s anecdote would be equally supportive of the hypothesis that autism is the result of genetics.

    When my comment saying the same thing comes out of moderation, I really wasn’t just trying to echo you….

  128. #129 Gray Falcon
    November 28, 2011

    @326: That still doesn’t rule out you as a potential cause of autism. By your standards, the best way to test this is to kill you and see what happens.

  129. #130 Mrs. Woo
    November 28, 2011

    Mr MjD, I am just some uneducated person who is easily taken advantage of by manipulative critters of all sorts (including an incredibly intelligent chicken at the moment), but when researchers consider whether or not there might be a genetic link for my illness they look for “first degree relatives.”

    My sister is showing similar symptoms. This would suggest that the type of illness I have (there have also been discussions that more than one illness is under the diagnostic umbrella). Does this explanation help you at all to understand what Prometheus has suggested regarding a genetic component?

    If you are incapable of grasping these subtleties how can you insist your book contains anything that has been studied without bias?

  130. #131 Prometheus
    November 28, 2011

    MjD (#326):

    “To my knowledge, there is no diagnosis of autism in past family history.”

    Not surprising, since genome-wide studies suggest that de novo mutations are the most common cause of autism. The point is that Mr. Dochniak’s anecdote – like all the rest of his “supporting material” – supports hypotheses that don’t involve latex just as well as it supports his hypothesis.

    The exposure to latex from vaccines and exam gloves (which have been nitrile for many years) is so ubiquitous that it simply doesn’t add anything to the anecdote. His arguments – such as they are – could apply equally well (or equally poorly) if he was claiming that exposure to soy protein, Alternaria spores, cell phone radio emissions or reality TV were the cause of “regressive autism”.

    Now, I fully expect that – as he did after I responded to his comment #321 – Mr. Dochniak will come back with some sort of snappy, perhaps rhyming, rejoinder that will be a complete non sequitur and end with some variation on “Latex in vaccines causes autism! Refuse latex-containing vaccines!”.

    Show the courage to prove me wrong, Mr. Dochniak!

    Prometheus

  131. #132 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 28, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#330), “The exposure to latex from vaccines and exam gloves (which have been nitrile for many years) is so ubiquitous that it simply doesn’t add anything to the anecdote.”

    MjD’s response:

    I recall that you’ve disclosed reading part of the Nova Science book “Allergies and Autism”.

    In the book, the authors discuss how the timing, frequency, intensity, and types of exposure to H. brasiliensis natural latex affects the incidence of allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Comorbid factors including viral insult and bacterial insult (including vaccinations) may affect adaptive-immunity responsiveness to hevea-allergen exposure.

    Prometheus, I recommend you re-visit this book before diving into the book “Vaccine Delivery and Autism – The latex connection”.

    Sincerely,

    Michael J. Dochniak

  132. #133 Mrs. Woo
    November 28, 2011

    @Prometheus – at this point I can’t figure out if he does what is predicted because he can’t help himself or if it amuses him to do as you expect.

  133. #134 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 28, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#328), “That still doesn’t rule out you as a potential cause of autism. By your standards, the best way to test this is to kill you and see what happens.

    MjD’s response:

    I don’t want to die from the piercing of your talons. You are meant for greater things, Gray Falcon

    MjD

  134. #135 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 29, 2011

    Two pioneering models of evolutionary theory, Darwinian/Wallace selection and Mendelian genetics, have failed to shed light on the cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

    Charles Darwin conceded that natural selection is not the sole mechanism of evolutionary change and Alfred Wallace asserted that natural selection could not account for the human brain.

    Gregory Mendel’s genetic models of evolution and modern genetic-research techniques have failed to decipher the genetic code(s) in that a Mendelian (single-gene) mutation or a single chromosome abnormality has not been discovered.

    Adaptive immunity is a model that can be used to shed light on the evolution of ASD. Specifically, atypical expression of endogenous proteins from repeated adaptive immune-responses can affect neurological development and cognition.

    MjD

  135. #136 Gray Falcon
    November 29, 2011

    I don’t want to die from the piercing of your talons. You are meant for greater things, Gray Falcon

    Not my idea, yours. Remember, you suggested that banning latex was the best way of testing your hypothesis, rather than examining data.

  136. #137 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 29, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#336), “Remember, you suggested that banning latex was the best way of testing your hypothesis, rather than examining data.”

    MjD’s response:

    In science, examining data means studying those adversely affected.

    Medical science has already conclusively shown that the hevea-allergens are dangerous.

    It is humanistic, and technically possible, to make an effort to reduce the number of individuals harmed by natural-latex exposure.

    Step #1: Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  137. #138 Gray Falcon
    November 29, 2011

    No, step one is to determine whether there’s a problem or not. Perhaps this is why you don’t have a job. Your standard of quality is “cut first, then measure”.

  138. #139 Prometheus
    November 29, 2011

    Mrs. Woo (#333):

    “@Prometheus – at this point I can’t figure out if he does what is predicted because he can’t help himself or if it amuses him to do as you expect.”

    I’ve concluded that Mr. Dochniak simply doesn’t have the flexibility to alter his behavior patterns. He was responding in highly stereotyped fashion before I started predicting his responses – that’s how I was able to predict them in the first place.

    MjD (#335):

    “Charles Darwin conceded that natural selection is not the sole mechanism of evolutionary change and Alfred Wallace asserted that natural selection could not account for the human brain.”

    Charles Darwin (1809 – 1882)
    Alfred Wallace (1823 – 1913)

    “Gregory [sic] Mendel’s genetic models of evolution and modern genetic-research techniques have failed to decipher the genetic code(s) in that a Mendelian (single-gene) mutation or a single chromosome abnormality has not been discovered.”

    Gregor Mendel (1822 – 1884)

    Although it is beyond the scope of a single comment to cover the developments in evolution, neurodevelopment and genetics from the late 19th century to today, let me start by saying that a lot has been learned since Darwin, Mendel and Wallace made their landmark discoveries. In fact, much of what has been learned since the 19th century is that evolution, development and genetics are not as simple as early scientists/naturalists once thought.

    I’d like to encourage Mr. Dochniak to embrace the work of the the 20th and 21st centuries; in particular, I’d suggest he read the following papers (both are available free on-line):

    Girirajan S, et al. Relative Burden of Large CNVs on a Range of Neurodevelopmental Phenotypes. PLoS Genet. 2011 Nov;7(11):e1002334.

    Pinto D, et al. Functional impact of global rare copy number variation in autism spectrum disorders. Nature. 2010 Jul 15;466(7304):368-72.

    Even if he doesn’t understand these papers – which I expect – they should give him a feeling for how much more complex the field of genetics has become since Gregor Mendel’s time. In other words, the lack of a strictly “Mendelian” genetic model or a single “autism gene” does not mean that autism is not largely or even entirely genetic.

    Prometheus

  139. #140 Mrs. Woo
    November 29, 2011

    Isn’t this kind of rigidity sometimes a symptom of autism spectrum disorders? I know that no one can diagnose someone via internet, but since he has an autistic child…

    You have to wonder in the end, you know?

  140. #141 Constant Mews
    November 29, 2011

    And Dochniak, liar, fraud, and con-man, continues his endlessly repetitive posts. Contributing nothing, merely shilling for a book that will continue to tank, since he provides no reason to suppose that his suppositions and claims are true.

    Michael J Dochniak. Liar. Fraud. Con-man. In serious need of mental help.

  141. #142 Th1Th2bot Service Center
    November 29, 2011

    MJD, wouldn’t you like to free yourself from this daily drudgery? We may be able to hook you up with an automated solution! This proven technology has low startup costs and requires no long-term maintenance contract. Drop us a line.

  142. #143 lilady
    November 29, 2011

    @ Th1Th2bot Service Center: I’ll be watching for Dochniak’s agreement. If it isn’t forthcoming promptly…I’ll be back urging the Service Center to proceed with a trial run.

  143. #144 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 30, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#338), “Perhaps this is why you don’t have a job.”

    MjD’s response:

    A Gray Falcon chooses when to fly and so do I.

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  144. #145 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 30, 2011

    Prometheus writes (#339). “Even if he doesn’t understand these papers – which I expect – they should give him a feeling for how much more complex the field of genetics has become since Gregor Mendel’s time.

    MjD’s response:

    Let’s simplify, genes tell a cell how to make proteins. Each gene is a set of instructions for making one specific protein.

    The dramatic incease in ASD over the last ~30-years indicates a non-genetic factor (i.e., environmental insult).

    The hevea-allergens from natural-latex have been dramatically introduced, in the health care industry, over the last about 30-40 years (e.g., increased vaccinations wherein latex is inclusive).

    Refuse vaccines that have a latex warning.

    MjD

  145. #146 Renate
    November 30, 2011

    MjD
    Things happening in the same period don’t have to be related.

  146. #147 Mrs. Woo
    November 30, 2011

    “correlation does not equate to causality”

    Mr MjD, at very least I can thank you for your dogged determination. It has given the educated ones plenty of opportunities to demonstrate the skewed thinking approaches of someone who is not approaching a topic scientifically.

    I do not doubt that you believe latex causes autism. However, I believe you started with that belief and then grasped every possible thing you could lay hands on to assure yourself your belief was true, rather than starting with a “I wonder if?” and then choosing scientific methods to determine if there was any basis in fact.

    Thank you, everyone, for the education I’ve received as I’ve watched “the thread that never ends” – at this point, though, I think at this point it’s almost as interesting as those soap opera thingies my grandma used to watch.

  147. #148 Michael J. Dochniak
    November 30, 2011

    Renate writes (#346), “Things happening in the same period don’t have to be related.”

    MjD’s response:

    A quote from a famous American Statistician:

    “Correlation is not causation but it sure is a hint.”

    MjD

  148. #149 Gray Falcon
    November 30, 2011

    A hint isn’t enough to justify prosecution on its own.

  149. #150 Michael J. Dochniak
    December 1, 2011

    Gray Falcon writes (#349), “A hint isn’t enough to justify prosecution on its own.”

    MjD’s response:

    In my opinion, a hint is absolutely justification when exposure to the hevea-allergens can adversely affect cognition and behaviors in atopic children (i.e., allergy-induced regressive autism).

    MjD

  150. #151 Prometheus
    December 1, 2011

    MjD (#345):

    “Let’s simplify, genes tell a cell how to make proteins. Each gene is a set of instructions for making one specific protein.”

    That’s a quaint description of molecular genetics, one that was obsolete after 1977 (see: introns). In most eukaryotes (like us), alternative splicing of mRNA means that one gene can code for many different proteins. In addition, some genes code for functional RNA, like ribosomal RNA, small nucleolar RNA, ribozymes and regulatory RNA.

    Again, even though Mr. Dochniak can’t understand the genetics of autism – as it is currently known – he should be able to see that it is much more complex than his simplistic description.

    “The dramatic incease [sic] in ASD over the last ~30-years indicates a non-genetic factor (i.e., environmental insult).”

    “Environmental insult” isn’t the only non-genetic factor that might have caused a “dramatic increase in ASD over the last 30 years”>, so that “i.e.” should have been an “e.g.“. Other, equally plausible (if not more plausible) explanations include:

    [1] Changing diagnostic and assessment criteria (most data is administrative, so not technically a “diagnosis). The definition of “autism” has braodened dramatically in the past thirty years and the term “autistic spectrum disorder” is so broad as to include almost anyone. At least one study has shown that as the prevalence of autism has increased, the severity (as measured by number of people with “low IQ”) has undergone a simultaneous decrease.

    [2] Category shifting – if you look at “autism” and “mental retardation” in the US Dept. of Education data, the rise in autism has been exactly paralleled by an equal drop in the number of children classified as “mentally retarded”.

    Mr. Dochinak, you need to keep an open mind to the possibility that your beliefs are not supported by the available data.

    Prometheus

  151. #152 Vicki
    December 1, 2011

    Also, even if there was good evidence for an increase in autism, and that the cause of that was an environmental insult, it doesn’t follow that said cause has anything to do with either vaccines or latex. When I think about the differences between 1981 and today, amount of latex isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. Yes, more people are using condoms than in 1981; we’re also spending more of the day looking at backlit screens. (Even if you’ve been turning the television on as soon as you got home for the last 30 years, the job you’re getting home from is a lot more likely to involve a screen than the one you’d have come home from then.) Mr Dochniak, have you investigated levels of hormones and medication in the drinking water supply over this time period? The environment does not consist of a fixed set of activities, with air and water pollution level unchanged in every way, except for a varying level of latex.

  152. #153 Denice Walter
    December 1, 2011

    Here’s a parallel from Fuller Torrey:
    two western countries have *slightly* different rates of a SMI- 1% vs 1.5%. Does that mean that there are differing rates of this condition in those two places- perhaps due to differing genetic and/or environmental influences ?

    No, it means that they *draw the line* between the SMI and its related but less serious version *at different places*. They *define* the two related conditions in slightly differing ways and yes, it *adds up*: Country A has more of the serious form and less of the other, Country B the converse ( I’m simplifying, of course).

  153. #154 Antaeus Feldspar
    December 1, 2011

    In my opinion, a hint is absolutely justification when exposure to the hevea-allergens can adversely affect cognition and behaviors in atopic children (i.e., allergy-induced regressive autism).

    Okay, I used to think Mikey was just delusional. Now I think he’s delusional and drunk. How much more obvious can the circular logic be? You can’t use “allergies cause autism” as your justification for jumping to the conclusion that allergies cause autism! Mikey would look less stupid here if he was citing the Ouija Board as his source!

  154. #155 Michael J. Dochniak
    December 1, 2011

    Antaeus Feldspar writes (#354), “You can’t use “allergies cause autism” as your justification for jumping to the conclusion that allergies cause autism!”

    MjD’s response:

    What actually causes autism is a complex and puzzling question, but atypical immunity is known to play a dominant role. Vaccine Delivery and Autism (The Latex Connection) focuses on the allergenic proteins found in Hevea brasiliensis, a dry natural rubber (HDNR) found in some vaccine packaging and delivery systems. Along with scientific reasoning, empirical studies are used to illustrate that exposure to the allergenic proteins from HDNR affect the incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    MjD

  155. #156 Science Mom
    December 1, 2011

    Along with scientific reasoning, empirical studies are used to illustrate that exposure to the allergenic proteins from HDNR affect the incidence of atopy and allergy-induced regressive autism.

    Oh this is a keeper. Only in Dochniak’s mind can he claim the use of scientific reasoning and empirical studies for his ludicrous claim.

  156. #157 Antaeus Feldspar
    December 1, 2011

    What actually causes autism is a complex and puzzling question, but atypical immunity is is not known to play a dominant any role.

    FTFY.

  157. #158 Constant Mews
    December 1, 2011

    And Dochniak, liar, fraud, and con-man, continues his endlessly repetitive posts. Contributing nothing, merely shilling for a book that will continue to tank, since he provides no reason to suppose that his suppositions and claims are true.

    Michael J Dochniak. Liar. Fraud. Con-man.

    In serious need of mental help.

  158. #159 Prometheus
    December 1, 2011

    I’ve just posted the first part of a two- (or three-) part review of Mr. Dochniak’s latest book. The first part covers the setting events that led up to my review and some general comments about the book – I’ll get into the meat of the “science” in the next part(s).

    Feel free to comment, but be warned that I moderate all comments because my spam-to-comment ratio, even with a good spam filter, is pretty high.

    Enjoy!

    Prometheus

  159. #160 Lawrence
    December 1, 2011

    Prometheus – you are a brave man wading into that garbage. Given what you’ve written already, it is very likely (if not incredibly obvious) that MjD is merely copying & pasting lines from his book in response to the postings here, without actually reading the content that refutes point after point of his argument.

    I look forward to seeing the next part – and MjD’s response.

  160. #161 Narad
    December 1, 2011

    Oh, G-d, the poetry is coming from inside the book!

  161. #162 Prometheus
    December 1, 2011

    Narad,

    Yes, much of the “poetry” that Mr. Dochniak has posted in his comments – not to mention most of the “pithy” one-liners and almost all of “meat” of his comments – is copypasta from his book.

    I’m not an expert in computer science, but it seems that “Mr. Dochniak” could be a ‘bot that looks for themes in ‘blog threads and then pastes in the corresponding bits from the Dochniak/Dunn book.

    For everyone who has followed this thread since the original May post, it looks as though “Mr. Dochniak” has posted almost his entire book in his comments.

    I’ll try to get the next installment of my review out as soon as possible, but first I need to get rid of this pounding headache.

    Prometheus

  162. #163 Orac
    December 2, 2011

    Time to shut down another thread, it looks like. Have fun here, everyone:

    http://photoninthedarkness.com/?p=243

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