One of the most pernicious lies promoted by the antivaccine movement is a trope that I’ve labeled the “toxins gambit.” Basically, it’s the lie, oft repeated in hysterical terms, that there are all sorts of horrible toxic chemicals in vaccines, and it is those toxic substances that are responsible for the claimed adverse effects of vaccines. Now, it is true that there are substances in vaccines that can be toxic, but the toxins gambit completely ignores a little thing known as the dose-response curve or, if you want to go hundreds of years back in time, the admonition attributed to Paracelsus that the dose makes the poison. So, yes, some vaccines contain formaldehyde, but it’s such a small amount that it is overwhelmed by the amount of formaldehyde normally produced by the body. Similarly, yes some flu vaccines still contain the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal, but it, too, is such a small amount as to be harmless.

Part of the reason that the toxins gambit persists, besides that it’s very simple and very wrong, is that it’s a goldmine for quacks. Back in the day, before thimerosal was removed from all childhood vaccines in 2001 and even a few years after that, chelation therapy was sold as a means of treating “vaccine-induced autism” by “detoxifying” the mercury being blamed for it. Never mind that chelation therapy is a potentially dangerous treatment that killed a five year old. Indeed, “detoxifying” is a key component of a lot of autism quackery.

Apparently, everyone’s favorite con man quack (but I repeat myself) Mike Adams has decided to get in on the action, releasing a video last week on How to naturally detox from mandatory vaccine injections forced upon you by the medical police state. It’s something I had meant to write about earlier, but I was sidetracked by quacks killing a baby, Facebook’s having become a tool for antivaccine loons to use to harass pro-science advocates, and a painfully misguided post on how giving to cancer charities is a waste of money. Never let it be said that I don’t usually get back to posts like this, for they are to me as catnip to a cat, as you can see here:

If you’re being forced to take a vaccine against your will (by a totalitarian medical regime like California), are there things you can do to protect yourself from vaccine toxins?

You bet there are!

Vaccines contain mercury, aluminum, MSG, formaldehyde and other adjuvants such as squalene. These are all neurotoxic substances that can cause permanent brain damage, autism, seizures, comas and even death. This is precisely why vaccines cause autism and Asperger’s in some children as was openly admitted by a top CDC scientist named Dr. William Thompson.

The key to surviving this assault on your body is to eliminate these chemicals quickly. In this video filmed at our Consumer Wellness Center Laboratories, I reveal nutritional strategies for accelerating your body’s natural detox so that you can safely survive a vaccine assault that’s forced upon you by a coercive, fascist medical regime.

OK, first of all, Thompson never “admitted” that vaccines cause autism and Asperger’s. As vile and clueless as I now think William Thompson to be, he never stooped quite that low, although certainly antivaccine activists like Andrew Wakefield and Brian Hooker want you to think that’s what he said. Of course, it’s amusing to see how Adams tries to sell his message using the same antivaccine dog whistles that other, less radical antivaccine-sympathetic activists (like “Dr. Bob” Sears) use; i.e., equating vaccine mandates to fascist government oppression.

What’s really simultaneously hilarious and painful is to watch his video, in which Adams tries his damnedest to look like a real geek of a scientist. He even goes so far as to wear a geek T-shirt whose message will only be understood if you have a fair amount of knowledge about mathematics, as he sits in his faux laboratory (as he did before when asking for samples of Flint tap water to test) behind him. Not surprisingly, Adams begins by braggin about his mass spectrometer. Hilariously, he brags about how good he is at measuring mercury and how he found so much mercury in flu shots when in fact he found as much as the package insert says is there.

By the 2:00 mark, Adams has shown pictures of children who (he claims) were poisoned by vaccines to have either brain damage or autism and is claiming that what’s really “deadly” about vaccines is the chemical adjuvants. After that come the lies that the adjuvants are “not tested for safety at all.” He even pulls out the old antivaccine trope that the placebo used in the placebo group in clinical trials of vaccines includes the adjuvants. Of course, from a clinical trial design, that’s actually the best design if you want to show that it’s the vaccine antigens themselves that are responsible for the specific immune reaction, but Adams, like most antivaccine fanatics, lies by omission, forgetting the number of studies that use plain old-fashioned saline as the placebo. This issue came up in the comments after a recent post about Gardasil as well, and it’s a common antivaccine lie. None of this stops Adams from claiming that the vaccine industry is run by “criminals” and “profiteers” who “harm children for money.”

Project much, Mikey?

After all, Adams talks about mercury in vaccines in the form of thimerosal over an image of metallic mercury, which thimerosal is not. For someone claiming that vaccine manufacturers use fraudulent science, Adams is quick to lie a lot himself, by implying that thimerosal is basically the equivalent of metallic mercury when in fact it is an organomercury compound. He also points to monosodium glutamate as a neurotoxin. Of course, MSG is not an adjuvant, either. Ditto formaldehyde, which is a favorite bugaboo of antivaccinationists and has even been pointed to by our good friend Dr. Jay Gordon as evidence of “toxins” in vaccines. Hilariously, seeming the the only chemical Adams doesn’t mention in this part of the video is the one that really is an adjuvant: Aluminum salts.

In any case, Adams then goes on to claim that for someone to be “OK” after a vaccine shot, that person has to be able to quickly clear “potentially deadly toxins.” This is, of course, nonsense that forgets the maxim that the dose makes the poison and, in particular, how little of each “toxin” is in vaccines. To illustrate his point by mentioning a warning on the Gardasil package insert that some can pass out after the vaccine. Never mind that the reason girls (and now boys, given that Gardasil is recommended for them too) can pass out after a vaccine is not due to “toxins” in the vaccine but rather to a vasovagal reaction to the shot. It’s a reaction that occurs in girls and boys of that age in reaction to any shot, sometimes in reaction to giving blood. It is not an indication of something horribly toxic in the vaccine. And, no, unlike what Adams claims, if you inject a million children with a vaccine, there will not be 1,000 who suffer neurologic damage.

Of course, given that to him vaccines don’t harm those who can “rapidly clear” all the evil chemicals in them, Adams is more than happy to tell you how to clear those chemicals. So, using the rationale that mercury can compete with zinc to bind with various proteins, Adams claims that taking a lot of extra zinc before vaccination will protect against “mercury toxicity.” This is, of course, silly given the tiny amount of mercury involved. It’s even sillier because the main mechanism of mercury toxicity is thought to involve its ability to irreversibly inhibit enzymes that contain selenium, such as thioredoxin reductase. Zinc isn’t even recommended as a treatment or preventative for mercury toxicity. Adams also recommends—of course!—and organic diet and multimineral supplements to promote “mineralization.”

Next up, because of all the oxidation pathways that mercury can effect through its inhibition of selenium-containing enzymes (although Adams fails to mention that), Adams recommends lots of sulfur from garlic, raw egg yolks, and, of course, MSM supplements. Never mind that there is no recommended daily allowance for sulfur. Again, never mind that the amount of mercury in vaccines is so small as to be irrelevant as far as causing defects in these pathways.

After this, Adams ceases even to try for plausible mechanisms. He starts recommending compounds he views as anti-inflammatory because vaccines “cause inflammation” and because adjuvants are designed to cause inflammation to increase antibody response. His favorite? Turmeric. He even admits that there’s no evidence. Of course, there’s no good evidence for pretty much everything else Adams says here; so why not turmeric? Then of course, there’s vitamin C because of its “antioxidant properties.” There’s also vitamin D because Adams claims it “activates the immune system.” Never mind that if inflammation is what you’re worried about, activating the immune system might not be such a good idea. After all, it’s the immune system that mediates inflammation. He even claims that there are parts of the immune system that can be activated by vitamin D that can even eliminate chemicals as well.

Funny, I don’t recall ever reading about that in any of my textbooks on medicine or immunology.

Next up, Adams recommends avoiding toxic foods and—of course!—drugs, like fried food, alcoholic beverages, acetaminophen, and others. Of course, it’s a good idea not to consume alcohol in excess, just as it’s also a good idea not to eat too many fried foods, but doing so is not going to lessen your chance of a nonexistent “vaccine injury,” mainly because the vaccine injury Adams is frightening viewers about doesn’t exist. And, no, licorice root isn’t going to do anything either.

Adams’ conclusion interested me because it could very well be flipped around as a reason that vaccination shouldn’t be feared. Adams claims that people who lead healthy lifestyles can get rid of all these toxic chemicals in vaccines. Well, doesn’t that mean that the woo-friendly people who watch Mike Adams videos shouldn’t be afraid of vaccines? According to Adams’ “logic,” it’s really only those lazy people eating crappy diets and not exercising who have to worry. If you’re doing all the “right things” for yourself and your baby, according to Mike Adams, you have nothing to fear.

But who ever said Adams cared about internal consistency in his message? Vaccinate away, woo believers. Mike Adams said it’s fine as long as you make sure your child has had some zinc supplements, vitamins C and D, proper nutrition and hydration, and no acetaminophen. Your kid will be fine. Of course, your kid would be fine without all the woo, but if it takes a little woo to get you to vaccinate your child, I can live with that as long as it’s not harmful woo.

Thanks, Mike Adams!

Comments

  1. #1 Amethyst
    The Crystal Gem
    March 14, 2016

    And, I assume, he owns an online store (or knows someone who does) where you can get your hands on these magical supplements..?

  2. #2 SciStrike
    March 14, 2016

    Nice post! We’ve been addressing the anti-vaxxer quackery as well over at sciencedenierhallofshame.com
    May we quote you? (With credit and backlink, of course)

  3. #3 Murmur
    UK-ia
    March 14, 2016

    I can remember on several occasions sitting in the waiting area of a high school, just next to the room in which my school nursing colleagues were giving vaccinations, and counting the numbers of fainters…That was some strong sh!t they were administering…More people falling over than I was accustomed to seeing at nightclub kicking out time in a city centre on a Friday…

  4. #4 Peter Dugdale
    homeofhomeopathy
    March 14, 2016

    Murmur –
    it’s a form of white-coat syndrome, I guess. I feel it in myself sometimes in a hospital (even just visiting) or at the docs’.

  5. #5 herr doktor bimler
    March 14, 2016

    More people falling over than I was accustomed to seeing at nightclub kicking out time in a city centre on a Friday…

    They were channeling their Inner italian Soccer Player.

  6. #6 capnkrunch
    March 14, 2016

    Whenever Mike Adams recommends something it is a safe bet he sells it. Running down the list (I actually did check all of them):

    -Zinc supplements check
    -Organic food / organic diet DVDs check
    -Multimineral supplements check
    -MSM supplements check
    -Tumeric extract check
    -Vitamin C supplements check
    -Vitamin D supplements check

    7/7! Who would’ve guessed? Also, tumeric extract is on sale right now. Only $67.36 for a 3 pack of 2oz bottles. Wow! Such bargain!

    Adams is quick to lie a lot himself, by implying that thimerosal is basically the equivalent of metallic mercury when in fact it is an organomercury compound.

    This brings to mind a NN post* by one of Mike’s lackeys that said ethyl mercury is inorganic. Ironically this was in a post accusing another site of knowing nothing about chemistry.

    Globally recognized expert on mercury toxicity and mercury detoxification, Dr. Chris Shade, explained in an interview with Natural News that inorganic mercury (which includes ethyl mercury) is actually far more dangerous at the cellular level as it kills much more quickly.

    Take away from all this: Mike Adams is a money grubbing dishonest sleazebag. No major revelations here.

    *h[]p://www.naturalnews.com/050705_Politifact_journalistic_fraud_mercury_in_vaccines.html

  7. #7 Amethyst
    The Crystal Gem
    March 14, 2016

    @capnkrunch

    Whodathunk it, eh?

  8. #8 herr doktor bimler
    March 14, 2016

    Take away from all this: Mike Adams is a money grubbing dishonest sleazebag. No major revelations here.

    Mikey has written about the epiphany he experienced in 2008, about Prosperity Gospel, or “Mindful Wealth” as he prefers to call it, in which he realised that it is OK to grift on his readers. In fact bloggers who don’t scam their readers are merely revealing their cowardice, their moral weakness; they’re too scared to be wealthy.

    http://healthwyze.org/reports/616-special-report-the-legend-of-mike-adams-and-the-reality.html?showall=1

  9. #9 Helianthus
    March 14, 2016

    as he sits in his faux laboratory

    I have to admit, it’s a very clean lab. And the shelves on the right look empty.

    a totalitarian medical regime like California

    A lot of people around the world would fight to move into California and gladly submit to this medical regime. If only just, you know, to get out of a country with an actual totalitarian regime and a sh!ttier medical infrastructure.

    @ Amethyst

    And, I assume, he owns an online store (or knows someone who does)

    Yes on both.
    Well, sometimes he also runs his ICP-MS to show that the other guy’s magical supplements are full of plutonium, or something, and then provides algae extracts to catch it.

  10. #10 Murmur
    UK-ia
    March 14, 2016

    Peter @4

    Combination of that and the scary big needles those evil school nurses (waves to all my lovely school nursing colleagues) wave at the bairns…

    😉

    Oh, and not to mention the groups of bairns winding each other up beforehand about the injections.

  11. #11 Murmur
    UK-ia
    March 14, 2016

    Good Herr Doktor @5

    I’m thinking of the north east of England, mostly Newcastle: we don’t need any inner Italian footy player, just follow local cultural stereotypes (see also that excellent journal of record Viz).

  12. #12 Brian Deer
    March 14, 2016

    Being a scrupulously ethical man, I’m sure Mr Adams won’t be selling any of the products he says can beat vaccine damage, and now he’s heard that Dr Thompson didn’t say that vaccines cause autism or Asperger’s, he’ll want to check that information and make any necessary correction at his website.

    Yeah, right.

  13. #13 Science Mom
    http://justthevax.blogspot.com/
    March 14, 2016

    What about the squalene and the fact that no USAian vaccines contain squalene and only some flu vaccines in the EU have a squalene adjuvant? What happens if you “detox” from something that isn’t there? Oh noes!!!

  14. #14 Renate
    March 14, 2016

    @ Her Doktor Bimler

    Mikey has written about the epiphany he experienced in 2008, about Prosperity Gospel, or “Mindful Wealth” as he prefers to call it, in which he realised that it is OK to grift on his readers. In fact bloggers who don’t scam their readers are merely revealing their cowardice, their moral weakness; they’re too scared to be wealthy.

    And this man complains about the greed of Big Pharma?
    The least I could say is “Pot, meet kettle”.

  15. #15 MarkN
    March 14, 2016

    Point of clarification — the recommendation for “no acetaminophen” for peds comes from that jackass, not Orac, correct?

  16. #16 Eric Lund
    March 14, 2016

    Mikey has written about the epiphany he experienced in 2008, about Prosperity Gospel, or “Mindful Wealth” as he prefers to call it, in which he realised that it is OK to grift on his readers.

    Mike Adams is following a well-established path. Compare Banks, Collins, and Rutherford (1991).

  17. #17 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 14, 2016

    @MarkN

    Yes, it’s Mikey that’s saying to avoid acetaminophen.

  18. #18 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 14, 2016

    I can’t quite make it out, but what is that “All the facts” poster on the counter?

  19. #19 Michael J. Dochniak
    Iowa
    March 14, 2016

    Great read Orac, your story telling is second to none which is unfortunate for Mike Adams.

    Q. Does the dose response curve (e.g., the dose makes the poison) have validity when there are anaphylaxis symptoms to a vaccine component or contaminant.

    Extremely low concentrations of some vaccine components and contaminants can have life-threatening and life-changing consequences for some individuals with atypical adaptive immunity.

    @Orac,

    Do you recall reading about this in any of your textbooks on medicine and immunology?

  20. #20 sirhcton
    on the floor of the simulacrum factory
    March 14, 2016

    . . . he brags about how good he is at measuring mercury and how he found so much mercury in flu shots when in fact he found as much as the package insert says is there.

    Doesn’t confirming the claims of the package insert make Adams a shill for the FDA or Big Pharma?

  21. #21 Peter Dugdale
    March 14, 2016

    Murmur @10
    ..now I’ve got thinking about it again, I recalled, one of my brothers used to faint in hospital, even just visiting a relative…I’ve never keeled over.

  22. #22 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    Mikey** wore another crazy shirt on a recent video ( of a Rottweiler’s face close up) and revealed that he was also adorning himself with a Glock ( worn in a black leather holster at his right). He’s claimed he never goes out without one!
    Such fashion acumen!

    At any rate, he has a multitude of ways to make money off of his readers : selling supplements and foods, shampoo bedding ( for infants), indoor gardening supplies, heirloom seeds, de-tox materials, prepper supplies, subscriptions to his Inner Circle and of course he sells advertisement on his websites.

    I find it hilarious how he and the other idiot continuously harp on the evils of California ( and to a lesser extent, NY) whilst glorifying Texas ( where they have ranches / estates). They both espouse a libertarian, small government viewpoint so concepts like mandatory vaccination, gun laws and paying taxes for improving the public good are obviously anathema. HOWEVER I think that either ( although the other lives in NY part time) really couldn’t handle the vibes on the coasts because they are so seriously and deeply un-cool.
    Imagine if you will , Mikey strolling down the streets of SoHo dressed as I’ve described him-
    he’d be shot- with evil glances

    I suppose that he is writing for a certain audience although I’m sure that his gun-nuttery will turn off many left-leaning naturalistas. -btw- his political rants are as tasteless as his choices in apparel.

    ** I believe that I was the first to ever call him that

  23. #23 shay simmons
    March 14, 2016

    @Murmer:

    Reminds me of the last flu shot clinic our dept held at the local University. What is it about the sight of a syringe that makes healthy adolescents keel over? There were four EMTs lounging in the bleachers behind us keeping up a running commentary.

    “The blonde over there by the garbage can; she’s going down, she’s going, she’s gone!”

    “Kid in the red t-shirt with the nurse, he’s—OUT.”

    It was like being in the Coliseum and listening to bets on which Christian the lions got next.

  24. #24 shay simmons
    March 14, 2016

    “Murmur.” Cr@p.

  25. #25 shay simmons
    March 14, 2016

    he was also adorning himself with a Glock ( worn in a black leather holster at his right). He’s claimed he never goes out without one!

    He’s in Texas, isn’t he? I believe the Glock is standard business casual attire there.

  26. #26 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    -btw-
    about his ‘lab’:

    I’ve read that NN is based in Cedar Creek, Texas, outside Austin, and he’s said that he has a warehouse. His ranch is nearby. Perhaps we can ascertain his real estate holdings and get photos ( it may not be in his name directly) . I’ve found a listing for Tuscon but that may be old.

  27. #27 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    TUCSON

  28. #28 Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH
    March 14, 2016

    Formaldehyde is created in our bodies during various metabolic processes. I guess Adams and other antivaccinationists are ignorant of this. Yes, as Paracelsus wrote, the dose makes the poison, so the minute quantities of formaldehyde in vaccines add very little to that created by our own bodies and the formaldehyde in our bodies is detoxified rapidly and efficiently.

  29. #29 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    @ Joel A. Harrison, PhD, MPH:

    Although Mike brags about his background in mathematics/ science ( see Health Ranger.com bio), he also confessed that his degree is in writing technical copy ( in a NN post about his ‘brush with poverty’):
    he moved to Taiwan with his Taiwan-born wife in the 1990s, trying to work for tech companies, without success, he later wrote up brochures with her help, for selling products at conventions. Then News Target.

  30. #30 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    Here it is!
    his “Brush with Poverty” July 19, 2014

  31. #31 Mrs Grimble
    March 14, 2016

    That’s a maths geek tee Mikey is wearing; the joke is so weak that even I could more or less parse it (I had to look up the sigma symbol). Wow, I didn’t realise he was a maths genius as well as a qualified nutritional scientist…..

    But hey, it LOOKS sciency! And impressing the rubes is all that Mikey is about.

  32. #32 Helianthus
    March 14, 2016

    @ sirhcton

    Doesn’t confirming the claims of the package insert make Adams a shill for the FDA or Big Pharma?

    Ah, but the package insert, although found inside each vaccine box, has been missed by the men in black when they were busy hiding the evidence.
    That’s why you found also mention of autism, infertility, and death* on the package insert. These evil – and stupid – scientists signed their crime!

    * very often, followed by “none reported”.

    Also, you should read Mikey’s report on the flu shot’s mercury content.
    It was over the scale, man! Beyond anything the instrument was meant to measure.**

    ** smart and experimented lab techs will do a quick calculation of the expected values and dilute the sample appropriately, so the instrument can do a proper measure. But Mr Adams is above such puny mathematical trivialities.

    Um, I just took the pain to understand his t-shirt’s math joke.
    So Mike is into imaginary numbers?

  33. #33 Andy
    March 14, 2016

    shay simmons @ #23

    I’m in my late 30s and I’m still terrified of needles. Doesn’t stop me from getting the flu shot, but I still go white. Same thing when I give blood. Same thing when I see needles on television. Even if they’re animated needles.

  34. #34 Johnny
    127.0.0.1
    March 14, 2016

    …so the minute quantities of formaldehyde in vaccines add very little to that created by our own bodies…

    IIRC, one of the minions, in a comment maybe 6 to 12 months ago or so, provided the math that showed vaccines create a small area that will have less formaldehyde than normal. In short, vaccines have less formaldehyde per cc than people.

    I wish I’d saved that.

  35. #35 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    @ Helianthus:

    No, actually he’s into imaginary research and evidence.

  36. #36 Bend
    March 14, 2016

    I bet that Adams doesn’t even like pie. He’s such a liar.

  37. #37 Jazzlet
    March 14, 2016

    Loads of sulpher containing foods? Apart from anything else those kids are going to get called all the variations there are on ‘Stinky’ by their peers.

  38. #38 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    March 14, 2016

    I’m sure Mike Adams only sells the supplements he recommends as a service to his readers who might otherwise not be able to find them. Likewise, he only recommends the supplements he sells because he’s standing by his product.

    We call this a virtuous cycle. Or something.

  39. #39 chamel77
    Vancouver
    March 14, 2016

    I would imagine Mike is the guy at the party everyone hates being around. “You know what you’re drinking is loaded with toxins, right?”

  40. #40 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 14, 2016

    I got curious: High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling. Mouse study that found that high doses of zinc supplementation led to zinc deficiency in hippocampus, with impaired learning and memory. But I’m sure Mikey has just the supplement to boost learning and memory to offset this.

    Also found a fatal zinc overdose in a newborn.

    Finally, a case description of excessive zinc supplementation in a 17-year-old.

  41. #41 Eric Lund
    March 14, 2016

    So Mike is into imaginary numbers?

    Mike’s idea of imaginary numbers is probably along the lines of <a href="http://www.gocomics.com/calvinandhobbes/2009/02/18"Hobbes&#039;:

    You know, eleventeen, thirty-twelve, and all those. It’s a little confusing at first.

  42. #42 Eric Lund
    March 14, 2016

    Oops, bad link in post #40. Trying to fix it:
    Calvin and Hobbes on imaginary numbers

  43. #43 Lazarus Long Phuc Toai
    March 14, 2016

    Mikey’s drinky bottle is probably lined with BPA.

  44. #44 janet
    not having pie
    March 14, 2016

    I used to have a golden retriever named Mikey. That dog had a better grounding in science than Mr. Adams. (And was better looking.)

  45. #45 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    re Mikey, parties and alcohol:

    First of all, he says he doesn’t partake in social activities- he’s too busy working on the range and in the lab- but he may be spotted at Whole Foods.
    Also- according to his bio @ Health Ranger- he doesn’t drink or do drugs- ( similarly, the other idiot @ prn says he NEVER had an alcoholic drink in his life)

    So I’m sure he is just LOADS of fun at parties!
    Ranting, raving, professing his Truths and packing a Glock.

  46. #46 Takiar
    Sherbrooke, Canada
    March 14, 2016

    @ MJD #19

    As a trained pharmacologist with experience in dose-response curves, yes, even if a mind-boggingly low dose can elicit an effect (like in a anaphylactic response) it’s still dose-response, as a lower dose may not (like de-sensitization of allergies, you go with lower doses). If you have an effect that is not dose-dependent, that’s a big red flag regarding your experiments.

    Homeopathy is not part of that, because in that case, the odds of actually finding a single molecule in the solution/pill is extremely low (in a sense, in theory a pure homeopathic solution could elicit a reaction, one that requires the unthinkably low number of exactly 1 molecule, which has 0.000001% odds of actually being there…you have a better chance to win millions with the lottery) . That brings us to a fundamental pharmacological consideration: To act, a body must physically interact with its target (Corpora non agunt nisi fixata: ‘drugs will not act unless they are bound’).

  47. #47 jrkrideau
    At the bottom of the lake (the bottom end that is)
    March 14, 2016

    #11 Murmur

    Oh, and not to mention the groups of bairns winding each other up beforehand about the injections.

    Who would do that?

    Oh right, at university a friend and I were standing in line waiting to donate blood and telling the first-time donor/first-year student in line with us all sorts of horror stories just as one girl slump into a nurse’s arms and was dragged off to a cot. Oops!

  48. #48 MI Dawn
    March 14, 2016

    @Takiar at #44: MJD has a bee in his bonnet about latex and insists it is the root of all medical evils, causes autism, and simply giving a vaccine is sufficient exposure to latex (from the needle going through the rubber port, not the gloves) to cause ALL SORTS OF BAD THINGS. He’s not into homeopathy. He just ignores the fact that latex allergies *are* known and don’t cause what he says they do.

  49. #49 Calli Arcale
    http://fractalwonder.wordpress.com
    March 14, 2016

    Well, at least his shirt is appropriate for the date, as a great many geeks and nerds will be eating pie today in honor of 3-14. It’s more of a rebus than a legitimate math joke, but still cute.

    Can’t say the same for the rest of his blatant fear-mongering salesmanship. He’d fit right in with the snake oil salesmen of a century ago.

  50. #50 Orac
    March 14, 2016

    Also, because MJD became so obnoxiously persistent about Latex allergies over a fairly long period of time, he was put on “automatic moderate.” I approve his comments, but only as long as he doesn’t bring up Latex allergies any more. Longtime regulars know this subtext and how he sometimes slyly tries to slip oblique references to Latex allergies into his comments.

  51. #51 Gilbert
    March 14, 2016

    I still go white. Same thing when I give blood. Same thing when I see needles on television. Even if they’re animated needles.

    I feel your pain, Andy #33; I go ‘vasovegal’ at the sound of “next”. I had a preteen experience in a Parisians store whereby I was trying on some pants and somehow managed to thread a needle in them into, 2 inches along, and out of a vein on my wrist. I didn’t pass out that time but I was close. I think that may have something to do with my psycosomatic reaction.

    Orac #50, I had a blood draw a couple days ago and was asked if I was allergic to latex (which I am. Highly.). I commented on how impressed I was that they at least ask now. The very sweet little nurse must have been a student because she was mulling over not being able to find the vein through the thicker gloves. I tried to show her where it was as I’d always been told I have great veins though sometimes they would collapse upon insertion. The lady behind the dest told her to apply the tourniquet first (ohh, shit).

    “O.K. Big stick” (Ohh, what a giveaway). After a few seconds, she announced, “I’m gonna take this out” — I looked. The needle was in the proper distance but from the outside of the arm instead of in. This missed the vein by 1.25”. It was also in sideways. At this point, I broke out into a heavy sweat, watering down the elbow pads. The other nurse advised me to take all the time I wanted; She took over the other arm and got it done though she only remembered overhearing my stated allergy after she had already donned latex.

    I felt so bad for that student because she was a novice and improperly performed a tecnique on someone with my weak constitution. But, please, please, please people — If we fainters need to show you where the vein is then don’t take it as offence if we come in next time with it circled in sharpie marker. As I will be doing. And don’t tell us it is only *salt water* when some of us are tasting leeched chemicals from prefilled vials — This makes us think we are being poisoned and does not help in the least with the aforementioned vasovegal response. Please explain that there may be some taste.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2806387/

  52. #52 Chris
    March 14, 2016

    “He even goes so far as to wear a geek T-shirt whose message will only be understood if you have a fair amount of knowledge about mathematics, ”

    Oh, wow, that is a really bad joke. At first glance it reads as “i 8 sum pi.” Which we are supposed to conclude is “I ate some pie.”

    Though being evil former applied math geek who lives too close to a university where I drive by Greek Row much too often I parsed it as: “I ate Sigma Pi.”

    Sigma Pi is a college fraternity in many universities. Though not at my neighborhood university (though there is one at the other state university attended by father and brother). Just let your mind wander around in the gutter for a while.

    By the way, real math geeks wear shirts with this equation on it: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/EulerFormula.html

  53. #53 Denice Walter
    March 14, 2016

    Today Mikey intrepidly posts:

    “Will it soon be illegal to discuss natural medicine on the internet? ** Natural cures now threaten the medical monopolies of the pharmaceutical cartels”

    Facebook and twitter already CENSOR naturalism so hurry and sign up for Dr Murray’s Natural Medicine Summit before it’s heartlessly SHUT DOWN by evil, jack booted pharma.com fascists thus endangering and ruining MILLIONS of lives that could have been SAVED by us !!!!

    ( paraphrase- which is easy because I can so easily and blithely mime his purple prose and facile fear mongering idiocy)

    ** No.

  54. #54 Murmur
    UK-ia
    March 14, 2016

    jkr @ 47

    In the part of the world I grew up in and have lived in most of my life (north east England) winding people up (working your ticket in local parlance) is something one absorbs from the atmosphere or water or some such – you just HAVE to do it, it’s the rules.

  55. #55 Kathy
    March 14, 2016

    Darn it, I wanted to watch Mikey’s video but both links in this blog post go to another NN article: This link

    http://www.naturalnews.com/053207_mandatory_vaccines_detox_medical_police_state.html

    Goes to an article called “Top ten scientific achievements of Natural News and the Health Ranger (so far)”

    Did Mikey delete his video?

  56. #56 Kathy
    March 14, 2016

    Ooops, now it is working. Strange, I clicked on it several times and it went to that scientific achievements article. Maybe NN site was overwhelmed by curious prosciencers.

  57. #57 Narad
    March 14, 2016

    Goes to an article called “Top ten scientific achievements of Natural News and the Health Ranger (so far)”

    It’s a well-known phenomenon, which has been speculated to have something to do with links that originate from here.

    • #58 Orac
      March 14, 2016

      Yep. I think that Adams has it set to redirect traffic coming from links here to that page. I wonder if using something like bit.ly or tinyurl would bypass that? Copying the link, opening another browser window, and pasting it might also work.

  58. #59 Richard Smith
    March 14, 2016

    Adams also recommends—of course!—and organic diet and multimineral supplements to promote “mineralization.”

    But what if I don’t want to be a fossil?

    Gilbert (#51):

    And don’t tell us it is only *salt water* when some of us are tasting leeched chemicals from prefilled vials

    Dang. I’ve had three bouts of cellulitis in the past year, and every time I’ve ended up on IV antibiotics. I swear, every time they had to change the IV bag, what they assured me was “only *salt water*” to clear the IV line was always contaminated by those darned leached chemicals. Even at a completely unassociated walk-in clinic when I had a portable drip for a couple of days, it must have been the exact same contamination, as it was the exact same taste. Still, it’s good to know it’s not just a quirk of some people’s biology that makes them sensitive to the lungs expelling excess saline (or by-products of same), but yet another nasty bunch of toxins to worry about!

  59. #60 Takiar
    Sherbrooke, Canada
    March 14, 2016

    @MI Dawn #48
    I added the homeopathy thing to prevent people from using my own post about low doses (I’m a pharmacologist through and through, and denial of dose-response irks me a ton!), but thanks for the heads-up regarding MJD’s latex laser focus (which I did not know, so I’ve probably not been lurking/spare commenting on this blog long enough)

  60. #61 Gilbert
    March 14, 2016

    Even at a completely unassociated walk-in clinic

    There is a connection; Becton Dickinson Pharmaceutical Systems.

    Information from Becton Dickinson showed that the presence of volatile substances in the plastic material of the syringes was discovered in 2001 and that these substances were linked to the experience of minor reactions like bad taste or smell. Becton Dickinson concluded that these substances represented no toxic or pharmacological risk to patients’ health. The identification and saline-solution concentrations provided by Becton Dickinson were: 2-methyl-2-propanol: 8.5 ppm; 2-methyl-2-butanol: 0.7 ppm; ethyl-buthyl-ether: 0.4 ppm.

    I did not mean to imply that it is any more harmful than whiffing a little model glue, Richard Smith #58. Only that, when one is paranoid and going in for an unusual procedure, it is not very calming for the tech to be mocking that “it’s only sodium chloride; you know, salt?” when that immediate flush of glue smell is so prominent.

    My background in chemistry and physics probably didn’t help that such naive *reassurance* only served to further my mounting paranoia with its multiplied concomitant vasovegal and shock response… I was walking, talking, whiteghosted BP crashed over it. After I realized what had happened, the tech said they could not continue with the proceedure because the Iodine “feels really weird.” BTW, it took ten minutes for an orderly to show up to even take the bp; I guess actual iodine reactions must be rare enough to not bother having standby protocals or triage on hand.

  61. #62 Narad
    March 14, 2016

    By the way, real math geeks wear shirts with this equation on it

    Although I tend to doubt that most people sporting such attire understand that e is just nomenclatural shorthand for an actual function. L-rd knows one of my former bosses didn’t when she taped it to the fridge.

  62. #63 Johnny
    127.0.0.1
    March 14, 2016

    Takiar, to get the full flavor of MjD, might I recommend
    http://americanloons.blogspot.com/2013/07/628-michael-j-dochniak-denise-h-dunn.html

    You can also find him on YouTube, but be careful – those videos have Vogon like poetry.

  63. #64 Tracy
    March 14, 2016

    I am sitting squarely on the fence with this argument but I’m pretty disappointed in the argument presented by this blog. The problem is this ‘opinion article’ does not provide links to research articles supporting your counter argument to antivaxxers. You are just screaming ‘liar, liar, these unscientific quacks have no scientific proof’ and you are lowering yourself to the same level by delivering statements with no supporting evidence to back it up. That is science 101!
    For example the statement that there is no evidence of the anti-inflammatory effects of turmeric. If both yourself & Mike Adams bothered to research turmeric on a science database you would find most articles saying this: “Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenolic compound, is a component of Curcuma longa, commonly known as turmeric. It is a well-known anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-lipidemic agent and has recently been shown to modulate several diseases via epigenetic regulation.”
    This article is full of so many holes on what is just a tabloid blog & needs to work much harder to earn the ‘ science ‘ in its name.
    Honestly if you have any sort of science degree & you think this author is a genius, then go back to school.

  64. #65 Chris
    March 14, 2016

    I know the very usefulness of the natural logarithm, which uses one very particular transcendental number. This actual number is a natural fallout of taking the compound interest computation into infinity and beyond!.

    Do you know how Euler came up that the relationship between the natural logarithm, imaginary numbers and the two trig functions?

  65. #66 JustaTech
    March 14, 2016

    Food in the lab, Mikey? You’re fired.

    (Yes, technically a water bottle, but still!)

  66. #67 Elliott
    March 14, 2016

    No joke–drinking in the lab, no lab coat, no safety glasses–all would be grounds for immediate firing in my place of employment.

  67. #68 steve
    March 14, 2016

    The man has an M.A. in Nutrition……he’s probably in that lab after the big boys went home

  68. #69 Narad
    March 14, 2016

    Do you know how Euler came up that the relationship between the natural logarithm, imaginary numbers and the two trig functions?

    That was Cotes (PDF).

  69. #70 Chris
    March 14, 2016

    Ah, I see a similarity to the which version of calculus was used on the continent versus England (especially since Leibnitz’s symbols are more intuitive). Look’s like Cotes needed a better publicity agent, and was hampered by the above controversy. Which is probably why most of the applied math I learned were filled with French and German/Swiss names.

    But, the usefulness of Euler’s Formula (not identity) extends to Fourier Transforms, solutions to second order differential equations, and was pretty the basis of my employment.

    You see, unlike Mike Adams, I actually used the e, i, pi, omega, lambda, the long stylized S, mu, many versions of delta and on in on in the dynamic analysis structures. The woman who was transcribing my report was not happy she had to put the Greek alphabet thingamajig into her Wang word processor work station. She was kind of told that the company did not invest in that technology only to have her insist that the engineers hand write the other characters into what are supposed be professional reports.

    Then a few years later the actual word processors came around, and we were to figure out how to put the special characters in ourselves. Hello LaTex. 🙂 (now I know some who use Mathematica or MathLab).

  70. #71 The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge
    March 14, 2016

    “Had Cotes lived—then we had known something!”

    —Isaac Newton

  71. #72 Dogpouder
    March 14, 2016

    Mike Adams should be locked up.

  72. #73 herr doktor bimler
    March 14, 2016

    If both yourself & Mike Adams bothered to research turmeric on a science database you would find most articles saying this

    I am not sure if Curcumin is such a hot research topic now, after its main promoter — the person getting all the positive results — turned out to be a fraud.
    http://retractionwatch.com/2016/02/22/journal-retracts-7-papers-by-md-anderson-researcher-long-under-investigation/

  73. #74 Narad
    March 14, 2016

    But, the usefulness of Euler’s Formula (not identity) extends to Fourier Transforms, solutions to second order differential equations, and was pretty the basis of my employment.

    It came up at Peter Woit’s place last year, BTW.

  74. #75 Narad
    March 14, 2016

    If both yourself & Mike Adams bothered to research turmeric on a science database [sic] you would find most articles saying this….

    For certain values of “most.”

  75. #76 herr doktor bimler
    March 14, 2016

    Not to side-track the thread or anything, but here is some new autism griftiness for your entertainment:

    http://theautismintensive.com/

    “The Autism Intensive” being one Mike Mutzel, a supplement pimp from the Xymogen company (which people might recognise as one of Kelly Brogan’s income streams). He has set up this totally grass-roots altruistic organisation and gathered together an impressive collection of charlatans, grifters and Functional Medicine doctors (but I repeat myself) under its umbrella.

  76. #77 Ligh
    March 14, 2016

    Regardless of the lack of evidence, promoting products he happens to sell for either the prevention or treatment of toxicity caused by vaccines is a medical claim.

    “Reporting Unlawful Sales of Medical Products on the Internet

    If you find a website you think is illegally selling human drugs, animal drugs, medical devices, biological products, foods, dietary supplements or cosmetics over the Web, please select one of the three options below to report to FDA.” See site for details.

    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ucm059315.htm

  77. #78 Lighthorse
    March 14, 2016

    Sorry. My handle should have read Lighthorse.

  78. #79 Vincent Iannelli, MD
    March 14, 2016

    Zinc?

    Isn’t zinc a heavy metal? These kids going to need chelation after they go through his detox? 😉

  79. #80 Delphine
    March 14, 2016

    This meathead thinks quite highly of himself.

  80. #81 Alain
    March 15, 2016

    About Fainting, one of my colleague student at Bishop’s university who was a future MD barfed in the can after I started dissecting a cat for our human anatomy lab.

    Speaking of my dissection skills, they were and are second to none as I still hold the record for the best dissection ever. It’s a shame that I learned nothing else except how to dissect but that was because I was at the second lowest point of my life in depressive disorder and now that I think about it, I do wonder why they let me in the lab.

    Alain

  81. #82 Chris HIckie
    March 15, 2016

    Mikey probably thinks a natural log is what you pass after eating his supplements.

  82. #83 Narad
    March 15, 2016

    Isn’t zinc a heavy metal?

    Even worse, it’s group 12 in the periodic table. You know, like mercury.

  83. #84 Helianthus
    March 15, 2016

    @ Vincent Iannelli

    Isn’t zinc a heavy metal?

    You jest, but Todd #40 provided some interesting read about the hazard of high doses of zinc supplementation.

    Speaking of providing links to scientific articles…

    @ Tracy

    The problem is this ‘opinion article’ does not provide links to research articles supporting your counter argument to antivaxxers

    The little blue words in Orac’s posts will send you to previous articles from the same author, a few of those on topics related to vaccination or Mike Adams, or both.
    In these older articles, you will find links to articles the author – and the regulars – use as a basis for their “opinions”.
    Or you can open a damn university-level book on biology and learn basic notions on immunology and vaccines. Reading by your own initiative the scientific literature of reference about some topic without waiting to be pointed in the right direction by the author you are criticizing is science 101, BTW.

    Granted, it will take some time to peruse the archives and find these articles, or read a book. But, eh, do your own research.

  84. #85 Chris Preston
    March 15, 2016

    For example the statement that there is no evidence of the anti-inflammatory effects of turmeric.

    In fact the statement was that there was no good evidence that turmeric helped the inflammation caused by vaccines.

    Because well …

    But even then the evidence that turmeric has useful anti-inflammatory activities when consumed is itself pretty thin and based almost entirely on its ability to alter the activity of certain enzymes in cell model systems.

    Its performance in clinical trials has been frankly underwhelming, despite the activities of its boosters. The best thing about curcumin is that it is well tolerated as a treatment.

  85. #86 capnkrunch
    March 15, 2016

    I know Orac hates pedantry but I can’t resist pointing out that tumeric is currently listed as a top seller in the NN store. Hard to call that backfiring.

  86. #87 Liz Ditz
    United States
    March 15, 2016

    Chris Hickey at #82 Go to your room right now, young man Or buy me a new keyboard. Your choice.

  87. #88 Helianthus
    March 15, 2016

    @ capnkrunch

    Hard to call that backfiring.

    Oh, I don’t know about the backfiring part. Chris Hickie #82 may be on the right track.

  88. #89 Orac
    March 15, 2016

    The problem is this ‘opinion article’ does not provide links to research articles supporting your counter argument to antivaxxers

    The little blue words in Orac’s posts will send you to previous articles from the same author, a few of those on topics related to vaccination or Mike Adams, or both.

    My retort is this: The burden of proof is not on me. It’s Adams who is making claims that conflict with well-established science, such as that vaccines contain more “toxins” than the body can get rid of and that therefore the body needs help “detoxifying.” This is nonsense; there’s no evidence for it and a lot of evidence against it. Ditto turmeric; there is no evidence to support his claims. As for zinc, again, there is no evidence, and there is a real risk of zinc overdose in infants and small children.

    Tracy clearly doesn’t understand how science works. Even so, if she were to click on the links, she’d find posts by myself and others that explain in more detail the points I’m making. That’s the beauty of hyperlinks.

  89. #90 DD
    Pensacola
    March 15, 2016

    So, we all should blindly follow those who push vaccines? If you’re my age or older, you received 8 total vaccines or less, and guess what, we’re all fine. Today kids are mandated, unless exempt, anywhere from 36-49 doses of vaccines before they enter school. I never had these extra vaccines. I’m not a health risk as these kids would be deemed today if they received the number of vaccines that I did. Autism and childhood cancer were almost unheard of back then (of course some will say they didn’t know how to classify autism back then). Your immune system was designed to fight any disease. Strengthen your immune system, and you’ll be fine. Vaccines are a scam; plain and simple. Science pays for these vaccine studies, so they’re always flawed. Follow the money.

  90. #91 Box Turtle
    The Safeway Down the Block
    March 15, 2016

    Is Mikey’s turmeric any different from the stuff in the spice aisle?

  91. #92 Ivriniel
    March 15, 2016

    He’s recommending eating raw egg yolks after vaccination?

    I’m imagining some dim bulb giving this to their toddler who then gets food poisoning… And they’ll blame the symptoms on the vaccination.

  92. #93 Helianthus
    March 15, 2016

    Science pays for these vaccine studies

    Now that’s a new one.

  93. #94 Julian Frost
    Gauteng East Rand
    March 15, 2016

    So, we all should blindly follow those who push vaccines?

    Lovely strawman there. Make sure to keep it away from open flames. Nobody has said that.

    Today kids are mandated, unless exempt, anywhere from 36-49 doses of vaccines before they enter school.

    Citation needed. That number seems a little high to me.

    I’m not a health risk as these kids would be deemed today if they received the number of vaccines that I did.

    That’s because you most likely caught those diseases and are now immune to them. However, not everyone survives.

    Strengthen your immune system, and you’ll be fine.

    Several hundred years ago, people ate organic, drank fresh water and got plenty of exercise. Most died before they got to 20.

    Vaccines are a scam; plain and simple.

    If that’s the case, why have the rates of diseases we vaccinate against gone into free fall? Case in point: Measles. Chris, if your’e around, would you please post that chart of yours showing what happened after mass vaccination against Measles began?

  94. #95 Denice Walter
    March 15, 2016

    I just learned that Mikey will have a ( non- e) book coming out in July called ‘Food Forensics’ ( see article about Cruz/ Monsanto) which will be all about GMOs and glyphosate.
    He’s preparing the marks I suppose.

  95. #96 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 15, 2016

    The number is a bit high, but then, DD appears to be using a counting method favored among anti-vaccine folks, by which they claim there are 69 doses a child receives by the age of 18 (some even claim as high as 74 doses).

  96. #97 JGC
    March 15, 2016

    “If you’re my age or older, you received 8 total vaccines or less, and guess what, we’re all fine.”

    Survivor’s bias: the ones who weren’t fine–who died of an infectious disease before an effective vaccine protecting against it became available–didn’t get to be “your age or over” and so aren’t here to dispute your claim.

  97. #98 MI Dawn
    March 15, 2016

    Thanks, Todd, for your post. And I figured DD was being dishonest which I really resent because those are my initials. also.

    So, I haven’t figured out how the injections given to the mother count as injections to the baby (yes, I know, EBIL TOXINS) rather than just exposure. If I’m generous, I come up with 51 injections (figuring the baby gets EVERY flu vaccine and the HPV vaccine). Also, aren’t Hep A and B combined into 1 injection (my kids are 1987 and 1990 so I don’t know all the new vaccines as well). And, as you point out, many of these are available as combinations, further decreasing the number of injections.

    I can’t figure out where DD gets his/her numbers from. I had 3 DPT as an infant, another at age 5, MMR x 2 (early on then repeated at HS age, another TD at HS age. PLUS, I think every year or so we had TB tests. Remember those? They used to do them in the school. Line the kids up, pull out the 4-tine evil thing, jab, jab, jab down the line, 2 days later, line the kids up and read them. Maybe they don’t count as vaccines, but they were still “shots” and I can’t recall my kids EVER getting one until college (I’d need to find my copy of their injection records – like any good mother, I sent the original to them once they moved out in case of need).

  98. #99 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 15, 2016

    @MI Dawn

    Here’s an earlier post I wrote on the 69 doses claim that goes into a bit more detail. If a child gets all of the vaccines on the schedule (rather than just what’s required for school), without using combo vaccines (other than DTaP and MMR), they’ll get 53 doses. It can be significantly lower if combo vaccines are used. And not all of those are shots (e.g., rotavirus is oral, some flu vaccines are inhaled).

    Hep A and Hep B are separate vaccines. One is a two-dose series, the other is a three-dose series.

    As for the pregnant woman getting vaccinated somehow equaling the child also getting vaccinated, who knows? I’ve asked people making that claim to show me evidence that the vaccine crosses the placenta. No one’s done so yet. The mother’s antibodies can cross, but I’ve not seen any evidence that the vaccine itself crosses.

  99. #100 Dangerous Bacon
    March 15, 2016

    Todd: “DD appears to be using a counting method favored among anti-vaccine folks, by which they claim there are 69 doses a child receives by the age of 18 (some even claim as high as 74 doses).”

    Apart from DD, I have never seen an antivaxer scaremongering about “doses” of vaccines. In every other case, they flat-out lie about “X number of vaccines” to inflate the vaccine total (when they are talking about total doses by the age of 18, and even then the number of doses they claim is inaccurate).

  100. #101 Gilbert
    March 15, 2016

    The mother’s antibodies can cross, but I’ve not seen any evidence that the vaccine itself crosses

    Interesting, Todd W #100. Perhaps it will be a first to do so with a Zika vaccine. I mean, if virus is found in fetus brains, as they say, then it naturally follows that vaccines to it would also?

    At any rate, those small toxins may concentrate in developing fetus. For example, the usual route of excreation of mercury is through the bowel such that there is ‘in’, no out. Is it stacking up in non-working bowels of infants(, perhaps)? <– Of course, I'm only speculating as somehow I expect that there are 'no studies to show' direct in-foetu measurements of toxic load.

  101. #102 Andreas Johansson
    March 15, 2016

    chamel77 wrote:

    I would imagine Mike is the guy at the party everyone hates being around. “You know what you’re drinking is loaded with toxins, right?”

    Judging by what Denice says above, Mikey is an exception, but I find that most toxinophobes are remarkably unconcerned about alcohol, a chemical that unquestionably does cause a lot health issues.

    Perhaps because it’s “natural”, but by the usual natural-fallacist logic that shouldn’t extend to destilled spirits – refining and purifying substances normally makes them evil.

  102. #103 Chris
    March 15, 2016

    DD: “If you’re my age or older, you received 8 total vaccines or less, and guess what, we’re all fine. ”

    Well, except for Roald Dahl’s oldest child. How it work out for Olivia? Also it did not work out for a co-worker with a severe limp from polio. Oh, and not for the little girl next door who was partially deaf because her mother had rubella when a few months before she was born. It also really did not work out very well for the little boy in a couple of recent articles on this blog. Oh, and it definitely did not work out for my oldest who had seizures from a disease before its vaccine was available. Plus I could have done without the month of chicken pox which included my youngest who was only six months old (only a sadistic child hater would want to see a baby suffer like that).

    Julian Frost: “Case in point: Measles. Chris, if your’e around, would you please post that chart of yours showing what happened after mass vaccination against Measles began?”

    Of course. I shall post both of them. (and yes I am only here sporadically, it seems that I am in several medical waiting rooms and meetings lately with son, I just scanned the fifty page evaluation summary and “action plan” I got from the state’s Developmental Disabilities Administration — so I am having lots of “fun”).

    DD, you need to tell us why incidences of measles dropped 90% in the USA between 1960 and 1970. Do not mention deaths. Do not mention any other decade. Do not mention any other disease. Do not mention any other country (I am sorry, but neither England nor Wales are American states).

    Here is the census data of measles incidence in the USA during the 20th century:
    From http://www.census.gov/prod/99pubs/99statab/sec31.pdf
    Year…. Rate per 100000 of measles
    1912 . . . 310.0
    1920 . . . 480.5
    1925 . . . 194.3
    1930 . . . 340.8
    1935 . . . 584.6
    1940 . . . 220.7
    1945 . . . 110.2
    1950 . . . 210.1
    1955 . . . 337.9
    1960 . . . 245.4
    1965 . . . 135.1
    1970 . . . . 23.2
    1975 . . . . 11.3
    1980 . . . . . 5.9
    1985 . . . . . 1.2
    1990 . . . . .11.2
    1991 . . . . . .3.8
    1992 . . . . . .0.9
    1993 . . . . . .0.1
    1994 . . . . . .0.4
    1995 . . . . . .0.1
    1996 . . . . . .0.2
    1997 . . . . . . 0.1

    Here is more detailed data from an appendix of the CDC Pink Book starting in 1950:
    Disease: Measles in the USA
    Year__Cases____Deaths
    1950__319,124__468
    1951__530,118__683
    1952__683,077__618
    1953__449,146__462
    1954__682,720__518
    1955__555,156__345
    1956__611,936__530
    1957__486,799__389
    1958__763,094__552
    1959__406,162__385
    1960__441,703__380
    1961__423,919__434
    1962__481,530__408
    1963__385,156__364
    (^^ first vaccine licensed)
    1964__458,083__421
    1965__261,905__276
    1966__204,136__261
    1967___62,705___81
    1968___22,231___24
    1969___25,826___41
    1970___47,351___89
    1971___75,290___90
    (^^^ MMR licensed)
    1972___32,275___24
    1973___26,690___23
    1974___22,690___20
    1975___24,374___20
    1976___41,126___12
    1977___57,245___15
    1978___26,871___11
    (^^^ Measles Elimination Program started)
    1979___13,597____6
    1980___13,506___11
    1981____2,124____2
    1982____1,714____4
    1983____1,497____1
    1984____2,587____1
    1985____2,822____2
    1986____6,282____2
    1987____3,655____2
    1988____3,396____3
    1989___18,193___32 (this is what happens when
    1990___27,786___64 measles vaccine coverage
    1991____9,643___27 is reduced)
    1992____2,237____4
    1993______312____0 (vaccine coverage returns)
    1994______963____0
    1995______309____2
    1996______508____1
    1997______138____2
    1998______100____0
    1999______100____2
    2000_______86____1
    2001______116____1
    2002_______44____0
    2003_______56____1
    2004_______37____0
    2005_______66____1
    2006_______55____0
    2007_______43____0

  103. #104 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 15, 2016

    @Dangerous Bacon

    Spend some time on Twitter and you’ll see people claiming that kids receive 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, or 74 doses of vaccines by the age of 18, depending on whether they were looking at last year’s schedule or this year’s, and whether they are counting the vaccines recommended for pregnant women.

    NVIC (of course) has a poster claiming 69 doses. There are a couple of memes that claim X doses in 1983 vs. however many they’re claiming to scare people from today’s schedule. Those are passed around on Twitter and Facebook, as well as appearing on some web sites. So, DD isn’t the only one.

  104. #105 Delphine
    March 15, 2016

    So, we all should blindly follow those who push vaccines? If you’re my age or older, you received 8 total vaccines or less, and guess what, we’re all fine. Today kids are mandated, unless exempt, anywhere from 36-49 doses of vaccines before they enter school. I never had these extra vaccines. I’m not a health risk as these kids would be deemed today if they received the number of vaccines that I did. Autism and childhood cancer were almost unheard of back then (of course some will say they didn’t know how to classify autism back then). Your immune system was designed to fight any disease. Strengthen your immune system, and you’ll be fine. Vaccines are a scam; plain and simple. Science pays for these vaccine studies, so they’re always flawed. Follow the money.

    Let me tell you all about the shingles I got in grad school in my twenties…

    Love these privileged fools, operating under the tyranny of the healthy. Just do XYZ, and you’ll be fine! Only trashy/brown/dirty/poor people get sick.

  105. #107 Gilbert
    March 15, 2016

    @Delphine #106

    Have more kale {you will obey}
    https://www.noagendaplayer.com/listen/592/1-06-29

  106. #108 JP
    March 15, 2016

    ( in a NN post about his ‘brush with poverty’):

    I’ve been having one of those for like six years, it’s called “graduate school.”

    Although, to be fair, I actually make more money now than I did at any point previously, which is pretty sad. Although I did usually manage to bring home at least $10 an hour before grad school.

  107. #109 Renate
    March 15, 2016

    I think eating kale always was quite common in The Netherlands, but I don’t think we suffered less form diseases.
    Of course we didn’t eat the kale raw, or drink it in a smoothy, but we eat it nonetheless.

  108. #110 Chris
    March 15, 2016

    Ah, Dutch mashed potatoes and kale, with lots of sausage “gravy.” Though I suspect my son suffers a bit because his grandfather went through the starving time in North Holland during WWII.

  109. #111 Narad
    March 15, 2016

    Your immune system was designed [sic] to fight any disease.

    And pathogens evolve to evade your immune system.

    Strengthen your immune system, and you’ll be fine.

    Feel free to test that out with, oh, say, rabies, HIV, or a neti pot full of N. fowleri.

  110. #112 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 15, 2016

    Strengthen your immune system, and you’ll be fine.

    Feel free to test that out with, oh, say, rabies, HIV, or a neti pot full of N. fowleri.

    Or test out a strong and robust immune system and how it deals with influenza leading to a cytokine storm.

  111. #113 Science Mom
    http://justthevax.blogspot.com/
    March 15, 2016

    if virus is found in fetus brains, as they say, then it naturally follows that vaccines to it would also?

    No it doesn’t naturally follow because the point of a vaccine is to illicit an immune response without or very attenuated pathogenesis. Vaccine antigens consist of toxoids, recombinants and attenuated virii.

  112. #114 Todd W.
    March 15, 2016

    @Gilbert

    Interesting, Todd W #100. Perhaps it will be a first to do so with a Zika vaccine. I mean, if virus is found in fetus brains, as they say, then it naturally follows that vaccines to it would also?

    No, it doesn’t follow. First off, viruses infect host cells and hijack the reproductive processes within the cells. As they replicate, they burst the cells, spewing out more virions, which then infect more cells, etc. This helps them get carried to other parts of the body. The particles in viral vaccines do not do this. Second, even if we ignore the difference in cell-hijacking, viral vaccines are made with either weakened virions, which cannot replicate (or have greatly diminished capacity to do so), or they use proteins, which cannot infect cells, let alone replicate. So it would depend on how the vaccine is made. It’s a lot more complex than you suggest.

    At any rate, those small toxins may concentrate in developing fetus. For example, the usual route of excreation of mercury is through the bowel such that there is ‘in’, no out. Is it stacking up in non-working bowels of infants(, perhaps)? <– Of course, I'm only speculating as somehow I expect that there are 'no studies to show' direct in-foetu measurements of toxic load.

    Well, first you would have to show that they remain intact within the mother’s body (i.e., are not broken down via various metabolic processes), then that they get transported to the fetus (as opposed to being eliminated by the mother’s body), and then, if they survive all of that, that they are able to cross the placenta.

  113. #115 herr doktor bimler
    March 15, 2016

    Follow the money.

    I try, I try, but it always manages to go faster than me.

  114. #116 MrrKAT, Finland, EU
    March 15, 2016

    Does Mr. Adams sell supplements? What if I order them and find mercury in those by using mass spectrometer and post results in Youtube? Would he sue me from other side of globe?

  115. #117 Renate
    March 15, 2016

    @ Orac
    Yes our much respected host, kale with mashed potatoes and stuff. Love it. It’s on the menu for this Friday.

  116. #118 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    March 15, 2016

    if virus is found in fetus brains, as they say, then it naturally follows that vaccines to it would also?

    I would think that a live virus Zika vaccine would be a poor choice.

  117. #119 Chris
    March 15, 2016

    Hubby also loves it. I just need it to be less rich. Apparently his grandmother’s recipes all started with melt a half kilo of butter in a pan. The “gravy” made with butter that braised sausage is a bit too much. I have modified it.

    Oh, and yes, kale has been part of my diet ever since I met dear hubby forty years ago. It is not something “new.” Just like the edible gardening I have been doing since we moved to our first house over thirty years ago. I even grow kale (some of it was in my lentil soup that I made yesterday).

    I love it when something we have been doing for decades becomes trendy — again. Though my son is still autistic.

  118. #120 shay simmons
    March 15, 2016

    Apparently his grandmother’s recipes all started with melt a half kilo of butter in a pan.

    Nothing wrong with that. Enough butter, and even Brussels sprouts taste good.

  119. #121 shay simmons
    March 15, 2016

    “If you’re my age or older, you received 8 total vaccines or less, and guess what, we’re all fine. ”

    Tell that to my youngest brother (born 1963). Make sure he’s got his hearing aids in, first. Something about a harmless, common childhood disease called “measles?”

  120. #122 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    March 15, 2016

    Enough butter, and even Brussels sprouts taste good.

    Only in a 15C or better homeopathic dilution of Brussels sprouts in butter.

  121. #123 Liz Ditz
    Great State of California
    March 15, 2016

    I am happy to donate ALL my kale servings to those that enjoy them. I’ve tried and tried… although I do like chard, and bok choy is delightful and delicious.

    Mephistopheles O’Brien — I was at a restaurant serving (a) a salad of tossed Brussels sprouts leaves (NO THANK YOU) and then a separate appetizer item, sauteed hearts of Brussels sprouts — just the little white parts. To my surprise, I found the sauteed dish quite appealing. So much so I quit stealing bites from somebody else and ordered a whole serving for myself. I thought pigs would fly before I enjoyed Brussels sprouts in any form.

  122. #124 Chris Preston
    March 15, 2016

    Enough butter, and even Brussels sprouts taste good.

    Brussels sprouts always taste good if they are not overcooked.

    I recently discovered to my surprise that cauliflower was the same. The problem all my life has been people over cooking it.

  123. #125 Denice Walter
    March 15, 2016

    I can tolerate spinach, chard and broccoli BUT I really can’t stand many of the other green vegetables despite being served them in quite good restaurants. Salad greens are another story though.

    As I hear it from woo-meisters, I am probably killing myself because they claim those greens are indeed….
    the Elixir of Life Itself !!!!!!
    Green Smoothies Save Lives!
    Or was that beet juice?

  124. #126 Denice Walter
    March 15, 2016

    Liz will probably know this:
    I remember driving through Watsonville, Ca, which is IIRC the Brussels Sprouts Capitol of the World, near the Garlic Capitol of the World, Gilroy and one other vegetable/town.
    Needless to say, I didn’t sample them.

  125. #127 palindrom
    March 15, 2016

    Brussels sprouts deep fried with bacon are pretty good. Then again, anything similarly prepared is pretty good.

    I remember the late Edwin Newman, a TV reporter, doing a feature on the 1962 World’s Fair in New York (yes, I’m that old), and touting the Belgian pavilion, which he said “displays all the new ideas that Brussels sprouts.”

  126. #128 Narad
    March 15, 2016

    Although I am a fan of properly prepared Brussels sprouts, I do have a memory of a horrifying dish from (the former, it seems) Brother Ron Pickarski’s Friendly Foods involving the poor things and the sea vegetable arame.

  127. #129 Chris
    March 15, 2016

    I am a supertaster, but I like kale, broccoli and Brussel sprouts (the latter did require encouragement from dear hubby, which probably came before he brought up his Dutch relationship with kale in the list of favorite recipes when we moved into our first apartment). Supertasters are supposed to hate those. But I hate cilantro… there is no way I will learn to like the taste of soap.

    Hubby and I have learned to deal with the differences in our taste profiles. He really likes hot food, I do not. So even when I make something I think is spicy he still spreads Sriracha sauce on it. Despite being from two of the “Salmon Capitals” of Vancouver Island he hates fish, unless it is covered in hot sauce. So tonight I made Buffalo Cauliflower with Blue Cheese Sauce, served with jasmine rice* and his salmon that spent the day soaking in lots of hot sauce (mine was marinated in garlic, ginger and balsamic vinegar).

    We have figured it out after over thirty five years of marriage (we met forty years ago this month). The cruel thing about his love of cheese and things cooked in butter is his low cholesterol, mine is not so low (history of strokes on my mother’s side).

    At least our children like broccoli and spinach. They also told me they always thought my cooking was bland! Le sigh… it is hard being the supertaster mother to normal kids.

    * the jasmine rice included wine, onion, garden thyme and homemade chicken stock, which also used herbs from the garden (I even have a bay laurel tree!). I have been making my own beef, chicken and ham bone stock for over thirty years. Yet now it is trendy. How is something that I have been doing for decades considered “new”? Oh, and my oldest child still turned out to be autistic. I should also add he never got a DTP vaccine due to a history of neonatal seizures (don’t ask about the idiotic theories by “helpful people” I got for that!). I was doing the crud Mike Adams claims fixes everything even before he left Scientology and became Mr. Natural News.

  128. #130 Chris
    March 15, 2016

    Example of something dear hubby spreads Sriracha sauce on:

    I take chicken and dredge it in a mixture of flour, salt, pepper and paprika. Then I do an egg wash with a generous amount of Sriracha sauce mixed in, which is then covered in panko bread crumbs. Then they are fried in olive oil. It is spicy enough for me…. but he actually spreads more Sriracha over them!

    He hates it when I claim we have a “mixed” marriage: I am a supertaster and he has no taste. 😉

  129. #131 shay simons
    March 16, 2016

    Is there a support group for women married to men with Naugahyde palates? Shortly after we were married I cooked us sole bonne femme.

    He. Put. Catchup. On. It.

  130. #132 Narad
    March 16, 2016

    So even when I make something I think is spicy he still spreads Sriracha sauce stale hipster fashion ketchup on it.

    FTFY. I think I’ve already gone on about my opinion of the Rooster glop, but my machine is immersed in an ill-advised tree update of the equally ill advised Macports.

    I really need to switch to Homebrew. (A G4 PPC makes doing it by hand a bit too much. Donations welcome.)

  131. #133 MI Dawn
    March 16, 2016

    (raises hand) I love just about all green leafy vegetables, though the love has evolved over the years (don’t ask me about my mother’s spinach – and I *still* won’t touch liver thanks to her cooking – and she’s generally a good cook). I, too, seem to be a supertaster and have some very mild texture issues. But the biggest problem is getting used to cooking anything I want and how I want after 27 years of avoiding all mold-based cheeses (Parmesan for example) due to ex-spouse’s allergies. Unfortunately, I’m now dating someone who hates all shellfish…le sigh. But I have a great time playing in the kitchen when it’s all for me!

  132. #134 brook
    March 16, 2016

    @Chris, I’m a really good dishwasher!

    One of my teens has the cilantro=soap reaction, and certain textures make him gag but he loves heat. I have to ration the chilies when he cooks or the rest of us would be blowing smoke out our ears. We keep a jar of fish sauce with thai dragon peppers chopped into it so he can perk up his food.

  133. #135 Delphine
    March 16, 2016

    Is there a support group for women married to men with Naugahyde palates? Shortly after we were married I cooked us sole bonne femme.

    He. Put. Catchup. On. It.

    shay, I see I married your husband’s twin…

    He has pedestrian tastes, I have eaten and will eat just about anything (I love grasscutter, especially in a stew). He likes hamburgers, steak, and pizza. And chicken wings. And spicy things. And chocolate and beer but not together. And that’s it.

  134. #136 Delphine
    March 16, 2016

    Brussel sprouts are delicious when garnished with a little room temperature quality amber maple syrup. Learned this trick from my late in-laws, Quebec born and bred.

  135. #137 JP
    March 16, 2016

    Brussel sprouts are delicious when garnished with a little room temperature quality amber maple syrup.

    I used to make them this way, with the addition of some butter, salt and pepper. Pretty darn good. Also roasting them until they are a little bit blackened is perfect.

    He likes hamburgers, steak, and pizza. And chicken wings. And spicy things. And chocolate and beer but not together. And that’s it.

    Sounds like a kindred spirit, although I’ll eat just about anything that isn’t nailed down. Narad, incidentally, makes a mean hamburger. I didn’t even have to put any hot sauce on it, although the “pierogi stir fry” did get a liberal amount.

  136. #138 jrkrideau
    At the bottom of the lake (the bottom end that is)
    March 16, 2016

    86

    tumeric is currently listed as a top seller in the NN store

    Sounds reasonable to me. I use quite a bit in Indian and Middle Eastern cooking.

    #131 shay simons

    He. Put. Catchup. On. It.
    In France you probably could have gotten off with justifiable homicide.

  137. #139 Mephistopheles O'Brien
    March 16, 2016

    I enjoy watching America’s Test Kitchen. From time to time they prepare vegetables in some non-traditional way and describe them so well I cannot imagine they are the same vegetables that I’ve tried.

    However, whenever I try Brussels sprouts (which I’ve not had in Belgium), broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, various field peas, and miscellaneous other vegetables I never find the delights that I’m promised. I do try them from time to time just to be sure my palate hasn’t changed; I generally come to the same conclusion.

    I haven’t tried just the cores of the sprout without the green leaves, however, so if there’s an opportunity I’ll give it a taste.

    Naturally, I’m sure I’m the one missing out. Enjoy your sprouts.

  138. #140 Denice Walter
    March 16, 2016

    ” He. Put. Catchup. On. It.”

    Tell me about it. One of my creatures ( not the cat) behaves in similar fashion.
    Which is why we can’t have nice things.

    ( I should mention that my own food proclivities/ avoidances are not especially the easiest with which to deal but I digress..)

  139. #141 Denice Walter
    March 16, 2016

    @ Mephistopheles O’Brien:

    For broccoli, get something from a Chinese or Japanese cook/ chef. Trust me.
    For asparagus, a French cook.

    The rest, I’d forget.

  140. #142 Narad
    March 16, 2016

    For asparagus, a French cook.

    I occasionally do asparagus with a sauce of butter and fermented black beans. It’s one of the few ways that I like the stuff.

  141. #143 JP
    March 16, 2016

    I occasionally do asparagus with a sauce of butter and fermented black beans.

    I recently had chili oil with fermented black beans at a benefit our temple put on for the Flint water crisis this past weekend. I think it was the first time I’ve had them, pretty good. We had a whole ton of vegetarian Chinese food there, lots leftover. I helped ferry some of it to “Mercy House,” a small hangout and sometime shelter for the homeless in town.

  142. #144 Todd W.
    http://www.harpocratesspeaks.com
    March 16, 2016

    Brussels sprouts, cut in half and roasted with a little olive oil, salt and pepper is pretty good.

    For broccoli, heat some oil in a fry pan. Add some thinly sliced garlic and fry until they’re crispy, but not burnt. Remove them from the oil, then add the broccoli, cut into ~1/2″ slices, and sear on both sides. Remove and toss with the garlic chips.

    And I’m one of those rare people that loves cilantro (but I’m not fond of soap).

  143. #145 Chris
    March 16, 2016

    Todd W.: “And I’m one of those rare people that loves cilantro (but I’m not fond of soap).”

    That is because of genetics which makes my taste buds and smell receptors different from yours. I think it has to with chemical receptors, and other odd things.

    I believe that those of us who are sensitive to alkaloids are a bit rarer than you. Supertasters are about one quarter of the population, and there is not a big overlap on the Venn diagram of the cilantro sensitive and supertasters. It is discussed here:
    http://gastropod.com/the-good-the-bad-the-cilantro/

    My admiration for Harold McGee has been reduced.

  144. #146 Denice Walter
    March 16, 2016

    Altho’ I can tolerate cilantro, I find certain tastes and smells repellent:. especially some garden plants which have an earthy, moldy smell and various herbs and spices. Offhand I can’t think of any names but being within a few feet of them…
    Yiii!
    ( I’ve been avoiding the curries lately because of digestive problems not taste).

    Interestingly, I can separate out distinct smells within perfume formulae and often can name quite a few ingredients. OBVIOUSLY there are some that I really hate- including- oddly, many of the flower scents.
    I may recoil if someone is wearing something that smells terrible ( to me at least).

    I do have a thing for oakmoss and I usually like perfumes that blend several notes well so that none is overwhelming. One of the scents I wear most has lime and almonds. Another has sneakily well-hidden patchouli… but patchouli on its own? Gah!

  145. #147 JP
    March 16, 2016

    One of the scents I wear most has lime and almonds. Another has sneakily well-hidden patchouli… but patchouli on its own? Gah!

    I had a rather delicate “perfume” (not really parfum) called “Sea Mist” that I was wearing for a while. Lavendar, I think, something that mimics sea salt. Pretty nice.

    So no patchouli on its own, but how do you feel about Nag Champa? I burn the stuff regularly, although I have some Chinese and Japanese incense lying around as well. Plus some random Indian stuff from the same company that makes Nag Champa.

  146. #148 Alain
    March 16, 2016

    Poutine,

    Our Quebec only (or mostly) meal. French fries, curd cheese and gravy. I do make some once in a while but with two variations: beer based gravy and duck meat marinated in dark beer for 24 hours before slow cooking in the crock pot.

    Speaking about beer and work (you all remember I work in a brewery), I do think a bully (to me) at work has been fired (I’m awaiting confirmation from the general manager).

    I’m cautious because, so far, I’ve been probably the best superstar ever at work and that made a very small group of peoples (3 or 4) jealous about me including the bully but none of the jealous people sit on the management council and I have their unconditional support and then some. Even the general manager did a royal number of things for me: going to the businesses’ bank (he has two businesses) to get my paycheck changed, dealing with my landowner and various other sundry things.

    We’re all still working hard but the number of employees doubled from my beginning there so it’s a bit easier and I built myself a strong pair of muscles by doing the inventory or the malt and hops.

    Finally, one of the coworkers in the management council lost her mother this weekend so I’m cooking for her beside other tasks to help her an easier load of work.

    Alain

  147. #149 Chris
    March 16, 2016

    Alain, I heard our White House served a version of poutine in honor of your country at a dinner with Prime Minister and Mrs. Trudeau. Though it turned out to be just a spoonful, a wee bite of it with the flavors of duck. I wonder if someone ripped off your beer marinated duck version. 😉

    Good luck at work, because you are obviously working very hard. Bullies tend to hate those who work hard and make them look bad. I am glad you have those who are advocating for you.

    “Finally, one of the coworkers in the management council lost her mother this weekend so I’m cooking for her beside other tasks to help her an easier load of work.”

    You are a very kind soul.

  148. #150 Delphine
    March 16, 2016

    Poutine, when done properly, is amazing. When done improperly, it’s merely delicious. 🙂

    I love cilantro. This post has made me think of “what will I absolutely not eat” and that is only one thing, alfalfa sprouts. I can’t stand them, they taste like dirt to me. I will eat pretty much everything else.

    I love patchouli, too. Straight. I’ll get my coat.

  149. #151 Narad
    March 17, 2016

    Todd W.: “And I’m one of those rare people that loves cilantro (but I’m not fond of soap).”

    That is because of genetics which makes my taste buds and smell receptors different from yours.

    Something something Malört something (I loathe anisettes, though). The linked paper briefly mentions cilantro as well, but the genetic evidence seems pretty sparse – I perceived it as soapy many years ago, but it passed.

    Then again, if one fixates on a distaste for something, it seems quite plausible that it could be self-reinforcing.

  150. #152 herr doktor bimler
    March 17, 2016
  151. #153 Brook
    More breweries per capita
    March 17, 2016

    @Alain, i hope your work woes end quickly. I’ve had some fantastic Quebec beers over the years and am looking forward to trying some more when I head back to Montreal in the not too distant future.

  152. #154 MI Dawn
    March 17, 2016

    I’m rather excited. Apparently, NJ has become the home of a meadery not too far from me. I’m going there on a tour this weekend with a few friends. I adore a good mead (not the supersweet ones).

  153. #155 Alain
    March 17, 2016

    I don’t know what my boss did but all the staff is more respectful than ever and I was wrong in labeling the coworker a bully. No one has been laid off and probably the thing that did the trick is my introspection method which I explained to my manager:

    If I encounter a problematic issue, I work it out to dissect what exactly bother and try to ask myself the question, how can I work it out so it does not bother me anymore. If that method doesn’t work, I work it out with the other party if another person is involved and finally, I call in my boss as last resort.

    Alain

  154. #156 Denice Walter
    March 17, 2016

    @ JP:

    I missed your comment.
    Nag Champa is alright I suppose as incense not sure if I would wear it. Mostly sandlewood, isn’t it?

    I no longer burn incense because one of my creatures ( not the cat) has asthma which returned after a long absence. Candles are alright if I stick to mundane scents like vanilla and Birthday Cake- nothing exotic or strong.

  155. #157 Narad
    March 17, 2016

    I no longer burn incense because one of my creatures ( not the cat) has asthma which returned after a long absence.

    Possibly not so good for the cat, either.

  156. #158 Chris Preston
    March 17, 2016

    Possibly not so good for the cat, either.

    Certainly not if you burn it.

  157. #159 Emma Crew
    one generation removed from Prunedale, CA.
    March 18, 2016

    Denise – It’s Castroville that is the artichoke capital. Watsonville (Driscoll’s) seems to be the provider of most grocery store strawberries on the west coast, and is also the home of Martinelli’s cider.

  158. #160 Denice Walter
    March 18, 2016

    @ Emma Crew:

    Thanks. I imagine Prunedale has prunes. I was there in 2007. I did see material wherein Watsonville proclaimed itself Brussels Sprout City or suchlike as well- I looked it up the other day but I remember driving through and saying,
    ” Not for me”. Now I recall Castroville as well,
    However I didn’t have any of these delicacies when I stayed in Monterrey/ Carmel for a few days.

  159. #161 Emma Crew
    March 18, 2016

    @Denise, you would THINK Prunedale has prunes, but they named it before realizing the climate was all wrong. My great-grandfather had an apple orchard, which last I knew had been converted to a kiwi farm. There is also a family story that back in the day folks in the area brought in eucalyptus from Australia to make fruit crates (since they grow so fast), but accidentally brought the kind with useless wood and now it is all over the dang state. Clearly folks around there were not so great with trees…

  160. #162 Denice Walter
    March 18, 2016

    @ Emma Crew:

    That’s hilarious. Especially when you think that California is THE place for trees.. I never saw such gigantic willows and oaks** not to mention redwoods.

    ** with oamoss.

  161. #163 Denice Walter
    March 18, 2016

    OAKMOSS

  162. #164 Chris
    March 18, 2016

    Denice: “However I didn’t have any of these delicacies when I stayed in Monterrey/ Carmel for a few days.”

    When my dad was stationed in Ft. Ord in the 1960s we would go out to Castrofield and he would by a dozen artichokes for a dollar. We loved them, though we did convince my three year old sister that the hearts were poisonous.

  163. #165 Narad
    March 18, 2016

    Watsonville (Driscoll’s) seems to be the provider of most grocery store strawberries on the west coast

    Oh, they’re bigger than that. Standard issue around the former grounds of the Century of Progress.

  164. #166 JP
    March 19, 2016

    Watsonville (Driscoll’s) seems to be the provider of most grocery store strawberries on the west coast, and is also the home of Martinelli’s cider.

    I have been advised to boycott Driscoll’s due to their stiffing Mexican farm workers on their wages. Solidarity forever, etc.

  165. #167 The Smith of Lie
    March 21, 2016

    I think I know why the dose – response curve is ignored by antivaxx loons. Simple – the very fact that mercury is so diluted in the vaccines is the very reason! It may not reach the horrible potency of properly succussed 30C or 100C nostrum, but that would outright kill anyone. Still it is dilluted enough to make it more toxic by the principles of homeopathy!

    Thus all of scientist who try and point that amounts of mercury in vaccines are minute, miss the point completly! Explaining that there’s so little of mercury that it might just as well not be there only confirms the fears of antivaxx crowd.

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