The Intersection

Archives for February, 2006

John Marburger on the Defensive

Without holding anything back, I’ve tried to be respectful in my criticisms of Bush science adviser John Marburger. He’s a well regarded scientist, after all. And I doubt he’s responsible for any of the troublesome behavior of the administration.

Darwin’s Birdwatching

Talk about a perfect combination of topics that are of interest to Science Blogs readers. I just came across this starred review in Publisher’s Weekly: January 30, 2006 Pilgrim on the Great Bird Continent: The Importance of Everything and Other Lessons from Darwin’s Lost Notebooks Lyanda Lynn Haupt. Little, Brown, $24.95 (288p) ISBN 0-316-83664-8 When…

Without a doubt, 2005 was the year that ignited a fierce and lasting debate over the extent to which global warming might be increasing the strength of hurricanes. That’s largely thanks to two back-to-back scientific papers, published in the leading journals Nature and in Science, which provided data suggesting that storms have grown considerably stronger…

Warming and Storming: My New Project

I frequently get asked how I plan on following up The Republican War on Science, a book that received a considerable amount of attention (and that will probably continue to do so, since there’s still a paperback to look forward to). This is a subject to which I’ve devoted a lot of thought–probably too much…

A Suggestion for New Orleans

Hey, maybe when they’re done with the rather inappropriate Mardi Gras celebration this year, they can gather up all the trash left on the street and use *that* to plug holes in the levees. Or better yet, how about asking all the tourists who come down to spend half a day cleaning up the mess…

Industry’s Science Games

I often get asked my opinion about who’s “worse” when it comes to manipulating and undermining scientific information: corporate America, or the Christian right. My usual answer is the Christian right, because its attacks on science are far more sweeping in their implications, and have the potential to undermine the very nature of scientific knowledge…

It wasn’t much publicized, but the American Association for the Advancement of Science recently adopted a statement in reaction to the latest allegations of scientific censorship in our government. You can read it here. According to AAAS: …censorship, intimidation, or other restriction on the freedom of scientists employed or funded by governmental organizations to communicate…

My Tavis Smiley Interview

A while back I appeared on the Tavis Smiley Show on PBS, and pretty much everyone who saw said it went very well. But little did I know, at least until now, that there’s an official transcript of the show available. You can check it out here. Meanwhile, you can also listen here.

Dennett and Ruse, Redux

PZ and Jason Rosenhouse are blogging about this testy email exchange between two of evolution’s top defenders, Michael Ruse and Daniel Dennett. I don’t fully grasp how or why these emails got out–it doesn’t seem like something that should have happened (although frankly, they’re not actually all that salacious anyway). But I would like to…

More Bad PR for Scientists

A new documentary, Flock of Dodos, is now out. The auteur, Randy Olson, is an “evolutionary ecologist with a Ph.D. from Harvard University.” But he’s also from Kansas originally, and he has made a film that apparently heaps a fair amount of scorn on both sides of the evolution debate: “Flock of Dodos” audiences laugh…