The Intersection

Brad Miller is Getting Tough

Taking over for Henry Waxman (not that the bulldog has gone to sleep or anything), Rep. Brad Miller is starting to cause some serious trouble for the Bush admin over politics and science. See here for an interview with Miller at DailyKos–which, thanks to DarkSyde, is once again doing a great job of bringing integrity of science issues to the political blogosphere. Anyway, what I like about the interview is that Miller gives credit where credit is due, including to Republicans like Sherwood Boehlert who are not pretending this problem doesn’t exist (although they could have been on the ball a lot sooner)….

Comments

  1. #1 Mark Paris
    April 14, 2006

    Let’s see how many politicians decide that there is a constituency for integrity.

  2. #2 laurence jewett
    April 14, 2006

    “We’ve gotten lots of e-mails calling our attention to previously published reports, some of which had gotten precious little attention at the time, but also we also received a couple of entirely new reports of the suppression of scientific research by the Bush Administration.” — Rep Miller, talking about the “Post-James Hansen-censorship world”.

    Despite implication to the contrary (eg, on some other blogs), the vast majority of scientists are a reserved lot, preferring to do their science in quiet anonymity.

    But like the sleeping giant, scientists are best left undisturbed.

    It looks to me like the giant just woke up.

    All I can say is “Woe to those within the Bush administration who have been tickling his foot with the feather of ‘Censorus maximus’ (The Censor bird)”

  3. #3 DarkSyde
    April 14, 2006

    Thanks for the link Chris. Hope you enjoyed your visit to Florida!

  4. #4 Kristjan Wager
    April 15, 2006

    laurence, I don’t agree with you description of scientitst. Most scientists I have seen are not reserved, and don’t prefer to do their science in quiet anonymity. However, they prefer to not get involved in politics, and having to dumb down their results for the general public, just to see their results used in ways they were never ment to be used.

  5. #5 Inoculated Mind
    April 16, 2006

    I just learned that Bush is going to be in my backyard on Earth Day, at the California Fuel Cell Partnership, and I was going to try to go and see if I can ask him a question having to do with science policy. Chris, I hope you don’t mind if I solicit questions from your readers? I thought this would be the best forum.

    If you could ask GW Bush one question about science or science policy, what would it be? Given the recent news about Hansen, and the event and location, I would prefer to ask one having to do with energy/environment. I do not yet know whether I would be able to ask him a question at all, but if I can I want it to be a zinger, but not too harsh that he’d dodge it. Any ideas, folks?

  6. #6 laurence jewett
    April 30, 2006

    >>laurence, I don’t agree with you description of scientitst. Most scientists I have seen are not reserved,

    Allow me to clarify: When I say “reserved”, I mean “reserved with respect to claims about their research.” In other words, they make an attempt (more than the average person, at any rate) NOT to exaggerate the results of that research and, by and large, do NOT attempt to hype their results in the popular press.

    Those who DO hype their research are not REAL scientists, in my book. (Convenient, eh?)

    >> and don’t prefer to do their science in quiet anonymity.

    When I refer to “anonymity, I am NOT referring to “anonymity within the scientific realm”. It should really go without saying that, with few exceptions, most scientists want their colleagues to know what they are doing “in the scientific arena”. Otherwise, that would sort of defeat the purpose.

    I am referring to “public anonymity”. While there may be a few scientists who like to be the center of media attention, most do not, for the simple reason that having to deal with the media takes away time from what they enjoy most: doing science.

    Note: I am talking here about the natural scientists I have known, NOT political “scientists”.

  7. #7 laurence jewett
    April 30, 2006

    “If you could ask GW Bush one question about science or science policy, what would it be?”

    Sorry if I’m too late for the event referred to above, but here’s the question I would ask Bush if given the chance:

    “George: Why do you have so little respect for knowledge in general and for scientific knowledge in particular?”

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