The Intersection

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Well…I am not bringing this blog back to life for the moment…but I also can’t avoid a major update like this.

I’m happy to announce that an article I did for Seed last year, about the Dover evolution trial, is now contained in Houghton-Mifflin’s Best American Science and Nature Writing 2006, edited this year by Brian Greene.

Obviously this volume, by definition, has lots of great stuff in it, including articles by Daniel Dennett, Dennis Overbye, Charles Mann, and many others. I hope you’ll check it out. You can buy the book here.

Comments

  1. #1 Joe sullivan
    October 5, 2006

    Sir,

    I enjoyed your book, The Republican War on Science, very much. I’m sure you heard this before…if you had called the book “The War On Science”, a lot more Republicans would have read it.

    Joe Sullivan
    Frisco, (in by god TEXAS)

  2. #2 bernarda
    October 6, 2006

    Here is a new course you could recommend to some of your journalist friends–or not–who have a weak understanding of science issues.

    http://www.badscience.net/?p=306#more-306

    “I know a fair few of you are journalists, and I thought I would mention something that I’m in the process of planning to see if you had any thoughts.

    Along with a couple of friends I am setting up a short course for journalists on how to interpret scienific research data, especially health data, focusing on clinical trials, claims for efficacy, and claims of harm. This will open covering simple issues like “what is a trial”, “what is a placebo”, “what does statistical significance mean”, and so on, but it will go on to cover much more interesting and important areas, like how to spot the classic flaws in research data, the different ways of expressing risk, and what questions to ask to get the most useful information out of researchers/press officers/companies/cranks.”

  3. #3 somnilista, FCD
    October 7, 2006

    How pleasant to learn that this is not the same series or publisher as The Best American Science Writing 2005, which included a piece by your close personal friend David Berlinski.

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