The Intersection

Read it here. The review is by the New Orleans Times Picayune‘s Pulitzer winning writer John McQuaid, who is the coauthor of a really great book that helped me a lot with my own research, Path of Destruction: The Devastation of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms. Here’s an excerpt from McQuaid’s review:

Storm World is at its most cogent on the author’s favorite issue: science in the noisy public square. Many hurricane scientists reacted with dismay when their subtle arguments were distorted by press accounts or used to score partisan points in the political storm that erupted after Katrina. One declared he’ll become “a bloody hermit on a mountaintop” the next time he publishes a paper. But Georgia Tech climate scientist Judith Curry decided that maybe it’s the tradition-bound rules of academia that are out of sync with today’s wired world, and that perhaps scientists should learn how to communicate in the age of blogs and the 24/7 news cycle. That would help the public and politicians gain a deeper understanding of the hurricane threat — which, Mooney regrettably concludes, looks as if it will indeed be getting worse. ยท

The Post also publishes online an excerpt of the book’s first chapter. That means both the opening interlude (“The Party Line“) and much of the first chapter (“Chimneys and Whirlpools”) are now available…