The Intersection

Archives for January, 2008

So: I don’t know if I said that I’m in New Orleans at the moment. Being busy and traveling, it has been hard to blog, as always. I am here for the American Meteorological Society meeting, where on Wednesday I spoke on this panel about science communication. Audio should be available at some point. I’ll…

A Leopard in Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa. The region is a spectacular desert landscape comprised of scrublands and red dunes. The park supports herds of blue wildebeest, leopard, gemsbok, springbok, black mane lions, raptors, and more. ~ Nicolas Devos, Biologist and Wildlife Photographer

My latest Science Progress column is now up. It’s about, well…big stuff. Science, the humanities, their failure to intersect, how to save the world…. All I can say is that it starts like this: Nearly ten years ago, to get myself officially clear of college, I wrote a senior English essay about parallels between the…

It should be no surprise to readers that I’m a huge fan of marine scientist, scibling, and friend Jennifer Jacquet. In many ways, I consider her my scienceblogging counterpart on the west coast. Last Saturday, we shared the Framing Science panel with Chris and even managed to have some fun in Durham over the weekend…

[Hurricane Felix near peak intensity in early September.] So finally, the National Hurricane Center has released its definitive report (PDF) on 2007’s Hurricane Felix. Definitive reports on Hurricane Dean and Tropical Storm Erin still await. However, the news from the Felix report is quite significant–Felix has been bumped up in intensity, making it the strongest…

The Science Times is finding creative ways to compare complex social networks thoughout the animal kingdom to politics as usual. Just as there are myriad strategies open to the human political animal with White House ambitions, so there are a number of nonhuman animals that behave like textbook politicians. Researchers who study highly gregarious and…

If we can get the world of science to speak with one voice on the matter, it will become harder and harder for politicians to resist the call for a presidential science debate. Today, that moves much closer to reality with the official news that the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s…

Blogger Unionization Watch

I’m pleased to say that my Columbia Journalism Review piece has started to make some ripples. It was discussed on Slashdot, which is always a big deal. And it was discussed by Andrew Sullivan, which is also always important. I’ve also gotten some very thoughtful emails, too–although, alas, I feel like this idea is still…

Framing Science REDUX

I enjoy receiving email and appreciate all of the feedback, links, and comments that have hit my inbox since Saturday’s panel with Jennifer and Chris on Framing Science. While the focus of my portion highlighted ScienceDebate2008, several readers have written with specific questions on Framing itself–and you bet I have some strong opinions! So it’s…

We Came, We Talked…We Quaffed

So…Sheril and I had a long day yesterday at the N.C. Science Blogging Conference, the highlight of which–at least for us, given how much we practiced for it–was our panel (with Jennifer) on the framing and communication of science. There have been a lot of reactions to the panel…for a sampling see Jennifer Ouellette, Josh…