The Intersection

Archives for June, 2008

Plight Of The Postdoc

This week I’ve composed my first column at Science Progress called ‘Plight of the Postdoc: Is modern American science strangling its young talents in the cradle?‘ The piece explores some illuminationg–and troubling–figures about the arduous road ahead for many early career scientists. At first glance, it might seem that American science finds itself in a…

Women We Like

‘I wanted to blaze a trail as a woman in math–once I decided I probably couldn’t be a baseball player.’ – Moon Duchin A pioneer in mathematics, Moon hopes to do interdisciplinary teaching and research incorporating math and the humanities. Moon has a keen mathematical intellect, which she brings to bear on problems of history,…

You can read it here. It starts like this: It was one of the largest public demonstrations in US history. On June 12, 1982, an estimated 750,000 protesters thronged Central Park in New York City, chanting “No nukes!” and bearing signs reading “Reagan is a bomb — both should be banned” and “Arms are for…

Intersection Pick: EVO

Well I’m impressed… It’s called EVO or www.evo.com. The goal is simple: To increase transparency in the green market, decrease green washing, and encourage corporate responsibility. In response to this increasing demand for product transparency, EVO spent several years developing an objective and scalable technology to screen millions of products for their green attributes. EVO…

Real tribe. Not really lost. Turns out, the photos were a hoax to call attention to the dangers of the logging industry. The disclosures have been made by the man behind the pictures, José Carlos Meirelles, 61, one of the handful of sertanistas – experts on indigenous tribes – working for the Brazilian Indian Protection…

The latest issue of Wired is now on newsstands, though not yet online. In it, I have a lengthy feature story about the scientific mainstreaming of geoengineering, which has occurred because of several trends: 1. Global warming seems to be moving even faster than scientists originally expected. 2. Political solutions seem to be evolving even…

Meet Vanessa Woods… internationally published author, journalist, and [full disclosure] among my most interesting friends. I’ve just finished her latest book ‘It’s Every Monkey For Themselves: A true story of love sex and lies in the jungle‘ and cannot recommend it highly enough–An honest, funny, and poignant account of her research in Costa Rica with…

The animals are difficult to see and the density of the populations of grass eaters is very low right now… it is the dry season. ~ Nicolas Devos, Biologist and Wildlife Photographer My favorite wildlife photographer, Nicolas Devos, is back in South Africa. This morning I was delighted to open four incredible new photographs from…

NOAA’s Conrad Lautenbacher describes it as ‘science without borders‘: Scientists around the world are converging data on health, weather, behavior, and disasters to anticipate illness and prepare for pandemics. It’s called the Global Earth Observation System of Systems, recognizing that patterns and behaviors all about planet earth are intimately connected. Man-made delineations aside, we truly…

Over the past year, I’ve done well over two dozen talks, with Matthew Nisbet, about science communication. And now we’re taking it to the next level. Next week at CalTech, we’re unveiling a two-part affair: Our lecture (entitled “Speaking Science 2.0″) followed by an all day “Speaking Science” boot camp, which we’re describing as follows:…