The Intersection

Unscientific America Described

Lots of folks have been asking us about our forthcoming book, Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens our Future and we’re happy to report that the product description is finally available at Amazon:

Climate change, the energy crisis, nuclear proliferation–many of the most urgent problems of twenty-first century require scientific solutions. And yet Americans are paying less and less attention to scientists. For every five hours of cable news, less than a minute is devoted to science; 46 percent of Americans believe that God, not evolution, created life on earth; the number of newspapers with science sections has shrunk from ninety-five to thirty-three since 1989. The disconnect between the scientific community and American culture grows wider every day.

In Unscientific America, journalist and best-selling author Chris Mooney and scientist Sheril Kirshenbaum explain how corporate interests, a weak education system, science-phobic politicians, and hyperspecialized scientists have created this dangerous state of affairs. They also propose a broad array of initiatives that could reverse the current trend and lead to the greater integration of science into our national discourse–before it is too late.


i-e1113f2911139dee56e3756eae877642-brokentesttube.png

Comments

  1. #1 Lilian Nattel
    January 15, 2009

    With the financial/economic crisis that the U.S. is facing, it can’t afford to become a nation of ignorant people. The only hope that the U.S. has of alleviating its probable status as an economic backwater is through a population base that is well educated and healthy.

  2. #2 Ashutosh
    January 15, 2009

    Any upcoming book tours?

  3. #3 Kevin
    January 15, 2009

    I compliment you on your efforts and wish you success. The problem is that the people who most need to read this work are also the people least likely to read it. Hopefully, you can stimulate public debate and interest outside of the pro-science crowd.

  4. #4 Pierce R. Butler
    January 15, 2009

    … corporate interests, a weak education system, science-phobic politicians, and hyperspecialized scientists have created this dangerous state of affairs.

    Nothing about the contributions of kreationists, kwacks, and other kooks? (Oh, and Hollywood!)

  5. #5 Jon Winsor
    January 15, 2009

    The problem is that the people who most need to read this work are also the people least likely to read it.

    If you started a watchdog “better business bureau” for journalism, media, etc. (to toot the horn of my own idea from the other thread), people would *have* to read it to know what your thoughts are, what you’re going to call people out on, and what you’re looking for in a science literate public…

  6. #6 Ashutosh
    January 15, 2009

    Kevin has a good point; most of us who will read it already constitute the converted. Have you thought about sending some free copies to senators, congressmen and other policy-makers?

  7. #7 TomJoe
    January 15, 2009

    Being a bit of a pedant but … on the cover … you typically don’t see 15ml plastic conical tubes busted into pieces like that.

  8. #8 Laurent
    January 19, 2009

    Hum, maybe the issue is wider than one would think. Did you try to enlarge the question so as to include trends in Europe with regard to the science image?

    It could be nice to see connections, some certainly are. Maybe the opportunity to refine the analysis and increase the audience?

The site is undergoing maintenance presently. Commenting has been disabled. Please check back later!