Culture

The Intersection

Category archives for Culture

Today, we move to our new home at Discover Blogs: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/intersection While we have immensely enjoyed being a part of Scienceblogs, we’ve decided together that it is time to move on. Our tremendous thanks go out to Seed for hosting The Intersection since 2006 where we’ve been honored to share the network with such an…

Our Blogger Panel At Duke

As promised, photos* from last Friday with ‘the Bloggerati‘. Here I’m in terrific company with Misha, Bora, and Abel over lunch in Durham: Bora and I chat with students about why we blog: * Special thanks to Abel for sharing the images!  For a terrific detailed description of the day, visit Terra Sigillata…

Several readers have emailed me to comment on Michael Steele’s ummmm…imaginative explanations of both global ‘cooling‘ and Greenland: “We are cooling. We are not warming. The warming you see out there, the supposed warming, and I am using my finger quotation marks here, is part of the cooling process. Greenland, which is now covered in…

Today Bora, Abel, and I visited Duke’s Sanford Institute on Public Policy for the second year in a row to discuss the coverage of science, health, and policy. We chatted with a group of undergraduates about the evolution of science blogs, the emergence of blogging networks, the role of science blogs vs the MSM, and…

Nothing else matters today. Nothing except what is going to happen in the very last episode of Battlestar, which has been running since 2004 and now culminates in a two hour extravaganza. We know the Battlestar is about to jump into the Cylon colony to rescue Hera, the human-Cylon hybrid child, and to make a…

Ed Brayton, who I admire greatly, has a post that runs afoul of my “death of science journalism” sensitivity meter. You see, Ed came across a National Geographic story that says something dumb about “carbon dating.” Ed is surely right on the point of substance, and National Geographic should not have made the error. I…

The Evolution of Beauty

A couple weeks back, I composed a post entitled ‘Science Reveals How To Lose Weight And Keep It Off‘. The results weren’t surprising… research out of Harvard found that calories are the most significant part of the equation. However, what really resonated with a number of readers turned out to be a different topic related…

Last week we told you about the NYAS Two Cultures Conference coming up on May 9, 2009 in celebration of the 50 year anniversary of C.P. Snow’s famous Rede lecture. Politicians, academics, writers, and the media will converge to discuss science and society–including keynote addresses by E.O. Wilson, John Porter, and Dean Kamen. Today we’re…

Dora Revealed

Here she is… You’ve read about the controversy and now it’s time to weigh in. According to Reuters, Dora will continue solving mysteries related to the environment, wildlife, and school while maintaining her sense of adventure. As I wrote last week, I hope the middle school aged explorer remains curious, clever, self confident, and kind.…

Yesterday, we considered the meaning of scientific literacy in America… or lack thereof. So let’s take this discussion one step further as it’s a particularly interesting topic. According to the National Academies: Scientific literacy is the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs,…