Education

The Intersection

Category archives for Education

Our Blogger Panel At Duke

As promised, photos* from last Friday with ‘the Bloggerati‘. Here I’m in terrific company with Misha, Bora, and Abel over lunch in Durham: Bora and I chat with students about why we blog: * Special thanks to Abel for sharing the images!  For a terrific detailed description of the day, visit Terra Sigillata…

Today Bora, Abel, and I visited Duke’s Sanford Institute on Public Policy for the second year in a row to discuss the coverage of science, health, and policy. We chatted with a group of undergraduates about the evolution of science blogs, the emergence of blogging networks, the role of science blogs vs the MSM, and…

Ed Brayton, who I admire greatly, has a post that runs afoul of my “death of science journalism” sensitivity meter. You see, Ed came across a National Geographic story that says something dumb about “carbon dating.” Ed is surely right on the point of substance, and National Geographic should not have made the error. I…

Dora Revealed

Here she is… You’ve read about the controversy and now it’s time to weigh in. According to Reuters, Dora will continue solving mysteries related to the environment, wildlife, and school while maintaining her sense of adventure. As I wrote last week, I hope the middle school aged explorer remains curious, clever, self confident, and kind.…

Yesterday, we considered the meaning of scientific literacy in America… or lack thereof. So let’s take this discussion one step further as it’s a particularly interesting topic. According to the National Academies: Scientific literacy is the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs,…

In our forthcoming book, Unscientific America, Chris and I mention those national surveys where regularly, a large percentage of U.S. citizens fail to correctly answer basic science questions that they supposedly learned in school.  Last Friday, the latest results were released from the most recent quiz by the California Academy of Sciences and Harris Interactive. …

There were some great comments on our last post announcing the “Two Cultures” 50 year anniversary conference at the New York Academy of Sciences. I wanted to build on that discussion, but haven’t gotten around to it until now. So let’s address some of the more noteworthy points; meanwhile, I also suggest that anyone interested…

Yale Environment 360 interviews the renowned New Yorker journalist, who blames the media and scientists alike for our staggering failure to deal with this issue. Here’s a long quotation: e360: We’ve talked about journalists and generally the challenges in conveying this issue to the public. But what about scientists? I mean, scientists have a responsibility…

Over a year ago, we had an idea: We were doing a book that discusses the work of the British physicist-novelist C.P. Snow, and the 50 year anniversary of his world famous “two cultures” argument was coming up–May 7, 2009. Precisely 50 years earlier, Snow had delivered a lecture at Cambridge University lamenting the gap…

I LOVE all things space–arguably more than the next girl. For years I wanted to be an astrobiologist. Infinite possibilities and the ultimate opportunity to explore the unknown. And it’s no secret to readers that I adore Carl Sagan and Cosmos, which fostered a love and appreciation of science in so many of us. All…