Education

The Intersection

Category archives for Education

Man, Copernicus has been kicking my butt. All the star tables, geometry, etc were turning me in to a pumpkin. So I pulled down a secondary source–Kuhn’s The Copernican Revolution–and night became day. I honestly think one of the reasons that Kuhn’s later and more famous book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, had such a…

Chimpanzees Are NOT Pets!

You’ve likely already seen this story all over the news: Chimp’s owner calls vicious mauling ‘freak thing’ STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) — The owner of a 200-pound chimpanzee that viciously mauled a Stamford woman calls the incident “a freak thing,” but says her pet was not a “horrible” animal. Sandra Herold told NBC’s “Today Show” in…

I’ve been thrilled at the comments I’m getting in response to my posts on Nicholaus Copernicus. See for example here. So I’ve thought of a plan to invite blog readers to join me throughout the next several months as I push through a large number of other texts like De revolutionibus. For the remainder of…

Race, Gender, And Intelligence

Over at Genetic Future, Daniel is asking whether scientists should study race and IQ. The topic is taken on in the most recent issue of Nature here and here and it’s a conversation that resurfaces now and then among various colleagues in genetics: If there might be associations between gender or race and intelligence, should…

In my last post I remarked on how “radically strange–and yet strangely modern” I expected the 1543 work that kicked off the “scientific revolution” to be. Now that I’ve read the first two books of De Revolutionibus, I can say, boy was I right. This is the first of several posts about my experience of…

Over at Science Progress, I’ve been involved in putting together not one but two items timed for Darwin Day. The first is an op-ed coauthored with my prof here at Princeton, D. Graham Burnett, who teaches Darwin. We argue for historical nuance, which leads one to reject the idea that Darwin should be considered an…

This is a post simply to ask for comment on my last three (here, here, here) as a kind of genre exercise. Each post has been about my new foray into studying the history of science here at Princeton and testing out what it’s like to be a student again. (The most insane kind of…

A Note From Sheril

I’m posting this on Sheril’s behalf, as she is in the hospital right now: Dear readers and friends in and out of the blogosphere, I am extremely appreciative for so many emails during the past week. Thanks for offering your guestrooms, travel recommendations, and road trip advice. Thank you for invitations to speak at universities…

We’re pleased to repost the latest email from ScienceDebate: Dear Friend, Last Friday you and others in the science community took action and helped to restore $3.1 billion in cuts to science that had been planned in the Senate compromise version of the stimulus bill. That was a good victory for U.S. Science, but it…

In the last post, I introduced Francis Bacon–chiefly via the New Atlantis–and described a very interesting, if ultimately perhaps too strong, feminist reaction. But it’s as though some feminists are Bacon’s only enemies. Neoconservative bioethicists, for example, see Bacon as the place where it all started to go wrong. Leon Kass, the great granddaddy of…