Framing Science

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Category archives for Framing Science

Best Of: Framing V: The Point!

originally published May 27, 2007 by Sheril R. Kirshenbaum Anticlimactic perhaps, but then you knew my last post on Framing wouldn’t provide closure on the topic. Hubris would be an understatement if I claimed to have a panacea of answers. Instead, what follows are a few musings to wrap up ideas from Thursday based on…

originally published May 23, 2007 by Sheril R. Kirshenbaum Imagine you’re a legislative staffer on Capitol Hill.. Short on time would be an understatement. In comes Joe scientist carrying charts and referencing stats and p-values. ‘Let’s talk Global Warming!‘ Again?! He’s the fourth PhD this afternoon. Kind of seems like old news. Today’s topic is…

Best Of: Framing III: Happy Feet

originally published May 23, 2007 by Sheril R. Kirshenbaum Much emphasis in traditional conservation is paced on ‘charismatic megafauna,’ meaning the species that we all know and love. The heroes of the big screen. Save the Oceans for Flipper and Free Willy. Keep those penguins marching and the polar bears drinking Coca-Cola. Market the smiling…

originally published May 23, 2007 by Sheril R. Kirshenbaum There’s not a one size fits all approach to getting a message across that resonates with the public and policymakers. The idea is to ‘Frame Science’ in a language that turns people on with the goal of engaging a targeted audience to think and care about…

originally published May 23, 2007 by Sheril R. Kirshenbaum That’s right, I said it. Dare I broach the topic sans Chris? Is it fair to discuss Framing when he’s not here at The Intersection to reply? I think YES. Just be aware everything that follows is ‘according to Sheril’ and none of this necessarily reflects…

The Science Communication Crisis

Today I am down at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, speaking to a class taught by Jeremy Jackson, along with journalists Ken Weiss from the Los Angeles Times, Rex Dalton from Nature, and Mark Dowie from Mother Jones and many many other outlets. We’ve all been addressing science communication in its various aspects, and there’s…

Paradigm Sheep

That’s the title of my latest Science Progress column….even though the column itself is not entirely about sheep. Rather, it’s a recounting of the Mooney-Nisbet science communication “boot camp” at Caltech….but, well, sheep came up, and believe it or not, it was in a pretty profound way. Insofar as that’s possible. For more, read the…

Over the past year, I’ve done well over two dozen talks, with Matthew Nisbet, about science communication. And now we’re taking it to the next level. Next week at CalTech, we’re unveiling a two-part affair: Our lecture (entitled “Speaking Science 2.0″) followed by an all day “Speaking Science” boot camp, which we’re describing as follows:…

At the risk of getting more comments about framing…In January I spoke at the 2008 American Meteorological Society meeting’s 7th Communication Workshop, and the audio and powerpoints are now online. Many or most of the panelists–and especially myself and Arthur Lupia of the University of Michigan–are making “framing science”-type arguments, but of course, there is…

Well, discussion seems to have mostly run its course on “framing science” premises II and III. I have defended them, at least to my own satisfaction. There may be some folks who still reject them, but at this point, at least for those who don’t, I’m ready to continue with the argument. So let’s get…