Media and Science

The Intersection

Category archives for Media and Science

Today, we move to our new home at Discover Blogs: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/intersection While we have immensely enjoyed being a part of Scienceblogs, we’ve decided together that it is time to move on. Our tremendous thanks go out to Seed for hosting The Intersection since 2006 where we’ve been honored to share the network with such an…

Our Blogger Panel At Duke

As promised, photos* from last Friday with ‘the Bloggerati‘. Here I’m in terrific company with Misha, Bora, and Abel over lunch in Durham: Bora and I chat with students about why we blog: * Special thanks to Abel for sharing the images!  For a terrific detailed description of the day, visit Terra Sigillata…

As any reader of this blog knows, I was for a while very critical of the Washington Post editorial page amid the George Will affair. Now, my view has changed. Today the Post publishes, replete with links to many scientific sources, my op-ed answering three claims Will made in his now infamous “Dark Green Doomsayers”…

Today Bora, Abel, and I visited Duke’s Sanford Institute on Public Policy for the second year in a row to discuss the coverage of science, health, and policy. We chatted with a group of undergraduates about the evolution of science blogs, the emergence of blogging networks, the role of science blogs vs the MSM, and…

Ed Brayton, who I admire greatly, has a post that runs afoul of my “death of science journalism” sensitivity meter. You see, Ed came across a National Geographic story that says something dumb about “carbon dating.” Ed is surely right on the point of substance, and National Geographic should not have made the error. I…

My latest Science Progress column contemplates this question, in the wake of a spot of news that doesn’t seem to have caused any uproar (yet)–namely, that DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, is apparently holding an event to discuss the prospect of geoengineering the climate. As I write in the column: This is newsworthy…

Last week we told you about the NYAS Two Cultures Conference coming up on May 9, 2009 in celebration of the 50 year anniversary of C.P. Snow’s famous Rede lecture. Politicians, academics, writers, and the media will converge to discuss science and society–including keynote addresses by E.O. Wilson, John Porter, and Dean Kamen. Today we’re…

Yesterday, we considered the meaning of scientific literacy in America… or lack thereof. So let’s take this discussion one step further as it’s a particularly interesting topic. According to the National Academies: Scientific literacy is the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs,…

In our forthcoming book, Unscientific America, Chris and I mention those national surveys where regularly, a large percentage of U.S. citizens fail to correctly answer basic science questions that they supposedly learned in school.  Last Friday, the latest results were released from the most recent quiz by the California Academy of Sciences and Harris Interactive. …

I don’t know how I missed this earlier in the week. But you really know science journalism is in danger when the Boston Globe, at the center of all things biotech, decides it can’t have a science/medicine section any longer. But maybe at least Larry Moran will be rejoicing. Think about it this way: Science…