Women in Science

The Intersection

Category archives for Women in Science

The Evolution of Beauty

A couple weeks back, I composed a post entitled ‘Science Reveals How To Lose Weight And Keep It Off‘. The results weren’t surprising… research out of Harvard found that calories are the most significant part of the equation. However, what really resonated with a number of readers turned out to be a different topic related…

The blogosphere is buzzing over the new middle school aged Dora The Explorer because of her recently released silhouette. Over at Packaging Girlhood, Lynn and Sharon suggest: If the original Dora grew up, she wouldn’t be a fashion icon or a shopaholic. She’d develop her map reading skills and imagine the places she could go.…

I’m off to the city for a panel in recognition of International Women’s Day. Given the theme, I’d like to point readers to a recent piece from The Guardian asking ‘Where are the books by women with big ideas?‘ Books like Freakonomics, defining significant cultural or economic trends with a punchy title, never seem to…

On Monday, I’m delighted to be attending a panel discussion in honor of the 2009 International Women’s Day celebrations!  This global holiday celebrates the economic, political, and social achievements of women past, present, and future. Here in NYC, the World Policy Institute, the Women’s Leadership Initiative at Demos, and The American-Scandinavian Foundation have organized: The…

Remembering Rio

In 1992, a small group of 12 and 13 year olds from the Environmental Children’s Organization (ECO) raised money to attend the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. This is Severn Suzuki’s address to delegates. Nearly early two decades later, her words are as relevant as ever. Are we doing any better?

Male chauvinist pig? Or worse? I haven’t even read Copernicus yet, and probably won’t at least until this weekend. As far as my reading goes, the scientific revolution hasn’t yet started and I’m still stuck with Ptolemaic glasses on. History 293, though, is churning away, and yesterday we did our section on Francis Bacon and…

What Will Obama Do with FDA?

If the president is going to restore science to its “rightful place,” he’s going to have to do something serious about the Food and Drug Administration. Not only was it the site of many Bush-era science related scandals, over matters like the over-the-counter availability of emergency contraception, but it has also broken down repeatedly on…

Sex, Work, Children, Trends

Science bloggers are still abuzz over Wednesday’s discussion of women in academia and now Razib (one of my very favorite sciblings) has taken the topic one step further.  He collected data on the mean number of hours worked last week broken down by sex and compared that with the number of children per individual. I…

My post yesterday on women in the academic workforce not only sparked some great comments, but also several interesting emails. One in particular got me thinking and with the author’s permission, I have decided to pose his concern to readers: Sheril, Your piece this morning is closely related to my current situation and I’m not…

As Natalie Angier rightly points out, women are making tremendous strides in science and engineering earning 40 percent of U.S. doctorates in 2006 (up from eight percent 50 years ago). But we’ve still got a long way to go in terms of leveling the playing field after graduation. Angier references a recent survey of 160,000…