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A restoration of the tiny trilobite Ctenopyge ceciliae. From Schoenemann et al, 2010. The first time I can remember seeing a trilobite, it wasn’t in a museum case or a book about prehistoric animals. It was on card 39 of the gratuitously gory Dinosaurs Attack! card series, a horrific vignette depicting four of the invertebrates…

Photographed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah.

I can’t help it – every time I pass a bookstore, I wonder whether they are going to carry my book when it comes out this autumn. November is still a long way away – summer does not even officially begin until next week – but I can’t help but wonder where my book will…

A golden-mantled ground squirrel (Spermophilus lateralis), photographed in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

A golden-mantled ground squirrel (Spermophilus lateralis), photographed in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. Though abundant at the Samwell Cave Popcorn Dome, California site during the Late Pleistocene, its numbers in the area decline at the beginning of the present Holocene epoch. “One of the penalties of an ecological education”, the naturalist Aldo Leopold once wrote,…

The skull of Mosasaurus hoffmani. From Lingham-Soliar 1995. On my first trip to the Inversand marl pit in Sewell, New Jersey, I didn’t find the wonderfully preserved Dryptosaurus skeleton I had been dreaming of. I picked up a number of Cretaceous bivalve shells and Paleocene sponges, but other than a few scraps of “Chunkosaurus” my…

Photo of the Day #944: Sunrise

Sunrise, photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

A drop in the bucket – a massive pile of bison skulls about to be ground into fertilizer, photographed circa 1870. From Wikipedia. From almost the very start, wolves were not welcome in Yellowstone. When the national park was established by the United States government in 1872 the bison population had crashed – a victim…

A Steller’s jay (Cyanocitta stelleri), photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

A McDonald’s ad from the Netherlands envisions what might have happened if Pleistocene humans had the option of visiting the drive-thru instead of going after fresh mammoth steak.