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Photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

A twisted tree situated along a trail at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

Pruning the Primate Family Tree

“Dinah”, a young female gorilla kept at the Bronx Zoo in 1914. From the Zoological Society Bulletin. Frustrated by the failure of gorillas to thrive in captivity, in 1914 the Bronx Zoo’s director William Hornaday lamented “There is not the slightest reason to hope that an adult gorilla, either male or female, ever will be…

Photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

Tracks and Traces 6.8.10

Welcome Maryn McKenna and her blog Superbug to Sb! And, in case I forgot to mention it before, make sure to check out Deborah Blum’s blog Speakeasy Science, too! Wildlife experts use civetone-containing cologne to lure big cats In a scene reminiscent of the ending of Kingdom of the Spiders, caterpillars blanket the English countryside…

In the part of suburban New Jersey I grew up in, almost every other school took the cougar for its sports team mascot. There were the Carl H. Kumpf Middle School Cougars, the Cranford High School Cougars, and the Kean University Cougars, among others. Nevermind that cougars were extirpated from the state long ago –…

A female pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), photographed at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

Sunrise Point at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah.

Repost: Twisting the cuttlefish

The “common cuttle-fish.” From Mysteries of the Ocean. About three decades before On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection would forever change biological science, the aspiring young naturalists Pierre-Stanislas Meyranx and Laurencet submitted a paper on mollusks to France’s prestigious Academie des Sciences. For weeks they waited for a patron from within…