carnivore

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Tag archives for carnivore

A small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinerea), photographed at the Bronx Zoo.

A ring-tailed mongoose (Galidia elegans), photographed at the Bronx Zoo.

African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), photographed at the Bronx Zoo. African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) don’t have it easy. Their taste for large mammalian prey puts them in competition with lions and spotted hyenas for both prey and living space, meaning that wild dogs regularly have their kills stolen or are even killed by other…

Rokan the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), photographed at the National Zoo in Washington, DC.

Photo of the Day #903: Sloth bear

A sloth bear (Melursus ursinus), photographed at the National Zoo in Washington DC.

A leopard (Panthera pardus). Image from Wikipedia. When a leopard eats a baboon, what is left behind? This question is not only relevant to primatologists and zoologists. Even though instances of predation on humans is relatively rare, big cats still kill and consume people, and when they do they can virtually obliterate a body. Yet,…

Finding a home for jaguars

A jaguar (Panthera onca). From Flickr user Prosper 973. One year ago this week Macho B was euthanized. He had been captured in mid-February of 2009, the only known jaguar living inside the United States, but after he was caught and fitted with a radio collar his health quickly deteriorated. When he nearly stopped moving…

A Yellowstone fox catches dinner

Yellowstone National Park is an amazing place. I stayed there for three days longer than I had originally planned and I still was not ready to leave it. Even if I had spent another week there I still would not have seen all the natural wonders of the park, but fortunately the BBC recently sent…

A Baby Mastodon Deathtrap (?)

Detail of a Charles R. Knight mural depicting a family a mastodons. Fossils often turn up in unexpected places. As people have dug swimming pools, tilled farms, blasted through mountains, and quarried the land for minerals traces of ancient life sometimes come to the surface, from isolated shark teeth to skeletons of our extinct hominin…

A reconstruction of Smilodon, photographed at the American Museum of Natural History. When it comes to animals, encyclopedias often present us with generalized descriptions. Where a creature lives, what color it is, what it eats, and other tidbits of information are listed to distinguish one species from another, but what is lost is an appreciation…