Last 24 Hours

ScienceBlogs is coming to an end. I don’t know that there was ever a really official announcement of this, but the bloggers got email a while back letting us know that the site will be closing down. I’ve been absolutely getting crushed between work and the book-in-progress and getting Charlie the pupper, but I did…

Today is the last day that ScienceBlogs will exist. Sometime today the site will go into read-only mode. A few days later, it will disappear completely from the Internet. It’s a sad thing to contemplate after all these years. Whatever happened later, I will always be grateful for the start in blogging I got there.…

So Long

Thank you to all the writers and commentators who contributed to this network. Happy trails. An archive of my work for ScienceBlogs exists here: 314vault.wordpress.com. If I post anything else on the internet it will be at medium.com/@k4lk1/ or twitter.com/k4lk1. In the meantime I’m getting out my ink and quill. Happy Halloween!

As of November 1st, 2017, ScienceBlogs is shutting down, necessitating relocation of this blog. It’s been over eight years and 1279 posts. It’s been predatory open access publishers, April Fool’s posts and multiple wars on science. A long and wonderful trip, career-transforming, network building and an awful lot of fun. Over that period of time,…

Sometime in the next day or two, Scienceblogs will shut down.  We’ve enjoyed the opportunity to blog here for the past 10+ years. Not to worry, @digitalbio and @finchtalk will continue blogging, but more so from their own site at Digital World Biology.  The Scienceblogs posts have been reposted at Digital World Biology’s scienceblog archive,…

Meet Charlie

It’s been a couple of years since we lost the Queen of Niskayuna, and we’ve held off getting a dog until now because we were planning a big home renovation– adding on to the mud room, creating a new bedroom on the second floor, and gutting and replacing the kitchen. This was quite the undertaking,…

We’re moving!!!!

You may be wondering why I have been so sentimental even though the year is not over yet. I am happy to inform you that it is not because I am retiring. On the contrary, I am packing up my virtual bags and moving this blog to a new site! Pardon the dust while we get…

Last Post

This is my last post at Scienceblogs.com. In the future I will be blogging at Greg Laden’s blog, located at its original home at gregladen.com. I have a feeling that Scienceblogs will not last long without me. What do you think? 🙂 But seriously, I’ll be talking about the story of the current status and…

And the #1 blog entry published thus far in 2017 discussed whether there was an evolutionary advantage to being stupid: —- As I was looking through the scientific literature the other day, I came across an article published in 1973, “The Evolutionary Advantages of Being Stupid.” With a title like that, how could I not…

The Last Goodbye

What better way to say farewell than with a slew of costume pictures from this year’s (coming) Halloween? Goodbye, Scienceblogs, it’s been an incredible almost-decade. Hope to see you all in all our other endeavors!

This is your last warning to update your links to mustelid.blogspot.com. I don’t know when Sb is going to peg out but it may well be end-of-this-month and I don’t expect to get any more warning.

“Delay is the deadliest form of denial.” -C. Northcote Parkinson Every massless particle and wave travels at the speed of light when it moves through a vacuum. Over a distance of 130 million light years, the gamma rays and gravitational waves emitted by merging neutron stars arrived offset by a mere 1.7 seconds, an incredible…

Recent pieces address school segregation, sexual harassment, the abrupt removal of EPA scientists from a conference program, and more.

“On what can we now place our hopes of solving the many riddles which still exist as to the origin and composition of cosmic rays?” –Victor Francis Hess It’s often said that advanced in physics aren’t met with “eureka!” but rather with “that’s funny,” but the truth is even stranger sometimes. Rather than the scientific method of:…

“I am looking at the future with concern, but with good hope.” –Albert Schweitzer Every so often, the argument comes up that science is expendable. That we’re simply investing too much of our resources — too much public money — into an endeavor with no short-term benefits. Meanwhile, there’s suffering of all kinds, from poverty…