Life Lines

Archives for April, 2012

Don’t forget to show your pride in comparative physiology at this year’s EB. If you get caught wearing something that says “comparative physiology”, “Dr. Dolittle”, or “Life Lines,” by one of the APS staffers or members of The American Physiological Society’s Communications Committee, you just may win free coffee! I don’t know about you, but…

To fly like a bird (continued)

As fun as it was to think about developing wings to fly like a bird, physics always wins. In case you haven’t yet figured it out, the prior video was of course a fake, albeit a really entertaining fake. That being said, here is the first ornithopter able to sustain flight. The aircraft was created…

To fly like a bird…

Most birds fly. To aid flight, avian bones are hollow, reducing their mass. In addition, bird wings and feathers are optimally designed for flight. So why can’t large birds or mammals fly? One of the problems is that they are too heavy to lift off the ground, necessitating unrealistically large wings to make it happen.…

Advancements in veterinary care

Image source: Richard Drew /AP, MSNBC I was just reading an article from The New York Times about advances in veterinary care and the ability to diagnose as well as treat many conditions that were once considered causes for euthanasia. These included leukemia (treated with bone marrow transplants), urinary tract disorders (treated with inserting stents),…

Image Source: Kate Wong, Scientific American Until now, I had heard of giving a dog a bone, but never a giraffe. They reportedly chew on bones as a source of minerals. This is also true for another herbivore, the desert tortoise. Who knew? Source: Esque, T.C., and E.L. Peters. 1994. Ingestion of bones, stones, and…